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Douglas Macarthur

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1986
Almost 90 years ago, U.S. troops occupied the Philippines. The Philippine people were derisively referred to as "our little children." One of our objectives was to teach these "children" democracy. During World War II, Gen. Douglas MacArthur returned to the Philippines promising freedom and democracy. After the war, the United States established a democratic government before withdrawing. When Ferdinand Marcos usurped and corrupted the democratic process in the Philippines, the United States turned a blind eye. America flouted its own democratic principles by ignoring the growing unrest against the Marcos regime.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Richard Cushing, an Associated Press war correspondent in Asia during World War II and later the head of the Voice of America, died Friday. He was 87. Cushing, who worked for AP in San Francisco for 15 years, was sent to the Pacific in the final year of World War II as a correspondent in the Philippines and Japan. He and two other correspondents were the first Americans to enter Tokyo after the war ended, his son said. Cushing covered the Japanese surrender to Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1991 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
A "Freedom Shrine" displaying reproductions of documents such as the Bill of Rights, the Declaration of Independence and letters from statesmen will be dedicated today at Costa Mesa High School. The Exchange Club of Newport Harbor erected the permanent shrine several weeks ago, club member Bill Demeulle said. The shrine contains plaques and 28 feet of documents and is one of several that will be placed this year throughout the country. Among the letters are a statement from President John F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1986
The "whitewash" that the Education Ministry of Japan gave to the brutalities and atrocities committed by Japan before and during World War II is an affront to every American serviceman who fought against this aggression. It is also a desecration to the memory of the Americans murdered on the Bataan Death March, to those Americans who were murdered and starved to death in Japanese prisons, and to those Americans who gave their lives in the Pacific. One thing these Japanese historians fail to remember is that were it not for Gen. Douglas MacArthur's stand against Russia, which wanted to carve out part of Japan for Russian domination, the people of Japan would be Russian slaves today.
NEWS
June 15, 1987 | Associated Press
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, a veteran of Pacific campaigns in World War II, pledged his support today for U.S.-Philippine plans to recapture this historic island's battle monuments from vandals and jungle rot. Shultz, in the first public appearance of a three-day trip to the Philippines, saw evidence of the decay during a tour of the island led by James Black Jr., a Corregidor-born businessman and historian.
NEWS
November 23, 1996
George Henry Pipal, 80, who handled the licensing and syndication of Charles Schultz's "Peanuts" comic strip. For the past 20 years, Pipal worked for United Media Enterprises, which owns the copyright to "Peanuts." In 1979, Pipal moved from Connecticut to Santa Rosa, Calif., in order to work in Schultz's offices. A native of Lafayette, Ind., Pipal attended the Columbia University School of Journalism and earned a Bronze Star serving in the Navy during World War II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
E. Wyman Spalding, 86, a retired actor and teacher who was the grandson of the co-founder of the Spalding sporting goods empire, died Dec. 3 in a Ventura hospital of natural causes. Spalding was never involved in running the company founded by his grandfather, J. Walter Spalding, and his great-uncle, Hall of Fame pitcher A.G. Spalding. Instead, he pursued a career as a Shakespearean actor and also portrayed Gen. Douglas MacArthur and French novelist Emile Zola.
NEWS
September 22, 1989
Retired Navy Capt. Roland W. Faulk, 82, the chaplain who led the prayer during the surrender ceremonies aboard the battleship Missouri at the end of World War II. On Sept. 2, 1945 the Methodist minister offered the prayer during ceremonies aboard the ship in Tokyo Bay that marked the end of the war with Japan. The prayer, which is encased at the Douglas MacArthur Library in Norfolk, Va., called on the victorious Allies to show mercy toward the conquered Japanese.
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