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Douglas P Wheeler

NEWS
August 24, 1993 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson announced a statewide plan Monday to increase the amount of wetlands in California by as much as half, while simultaneously making it easier for developers to obtain permission to build in some environmentally sensitive areas. With many details unresolved and timing uncertain, Resources Secretary Douglas P. Wheeler described the broad policy as including restoration and purchase of some wetlands and incentives for private owners to preserve their wetlands.
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NEWS
April 23, 1991 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The success of the ambitious environmental agenda outlined Monday by Gov. Pete Wilson will depend in large part on his ability to persuade the Legislature and voters to spend more money. The new governor also will have his work cut out if he is to meet his goal of finding a solution this year to the long-running fight between the timber industry and environmentalists over logging in Northern California. Nevertheless, at a time when the state is facing a $12.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1991
Pete Wilson is not a great orator and he was not a great U.S. senator. Nor is charisma exactly his middle name: For better or for worse, he is no John Kennedy--or Ronald Reagan. But as he takes the oath of office today as California's 37th governor, expectations are in fact running rather high. The hope is that somehow California may have stumbled upon just the right person to be in this job--and at just the right time. Such expectations arise for a number of reasons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1991 | Jerry Gillam, Times Staff Writer
Controversial legislation to permit the news media to televise executions carried out in San Quentin's gas chamber has been sent to the Assembly floor for a vote. The Assembly Way and Means Committee approved the legislation (AB 2246) by Assemblyman John Burton (D-San Francisco) with little debate. The committee vote was 13 to 8. Some supporters of the death penalty argue that televised executions would increase the value of capital punishment as a deterrent to potential killers.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1995 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a storm season that officials now consider the worst in state history, the California Department of Food and Agriculture Wednesday raised its estimate of crop losses from the winter rains to $519 million. Even that figure will probably keep rising, said Michael Chrisman, a department undersecretary, as a new round of wind and rain was tormenting farmers on Wednesday. The rain was especially heavy in the Napa and Sacramento valleys. "With the storm moving through now," Chrisman noted, "we're getting further and further into the fruit season."
NEWS
January 27, 1995 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all the misery they caused, the torrential rains that fell this month have also guaranteed that California homes and businesses will have plenty of water to get through this year and probably 1996 as well, officials said Thursday. With most of the state's 155 major reservoirs nearing capacity, the State Water Project is guaranteeing that it will deliver 100% of the water sought by local agencies, including the giant Metropolitan Water District that serves most of Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1996 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There were times when U.S. Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt thought this unorthodox ecological compromise might never come to pass. He admits he was not overly optimistic when he met with Irvine Co. and government officials more than three years ago about forging an all-new approach to habitat conservation in Southern California. "I went away from those early meetings thinking the chances were probably about 30%," Babbitt said in a Wednesday interview.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | LARRY B. STAMMER and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Peter Douglas, the strong-willed veteran executive officer of the California Coastal Commission, may be in danger of losing his job. Thomas Gwyn, chairman of the powerful coastal protection panel, said Douglas' status will be reviewed at the commission's July 19 meeting at Huntington Beach City Hall. Gwyn, who said he was acting at the urging of several commissioners, maintained that the move was fueled by Douglas' management style rather than disputes over commission policy.
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