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NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By Lisa Boone
After 10 years of running their brand online, Poketo designers Angie Myung and Ted Vadakan recently opened their first brick-and-mortar store in the downtown Los Angeles Arts District. The interior of the 4,000-square-foot store is clean, minimal and modern so that products, such as  Eric Trine's knockout chairs, above, can shine. “Poketo to us is about art and fun,” Vadakan said by phone from Comic-Con. “It's a very modern aesthetic.” On a recent afternoon, as the lunch crowd from Wurstküche spilled into Poketo's sunny space, shoppers browsed Poketo T-shirts, backpacks, fleece laptop covers, journals, sketch pads and limited-edition wallets by Tim Biskup , Japanese illustrator PCP and Matt Furie , among others.
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OPINION
June 29, 2013
Re "Creative destruction," Business, June 27 The demolition of the Wilshire Grand Hotel is certainly the end of an era for Los Angeles. When the hotel opened in 1952 as the Statler, it signaled a change for downtown Los Angeles. The Statler became the place to go for conferences, meetings and business lunches, taking away from the historic Biltmore. In some ways, the Statler signaled the rebirth of downtown Los Angeles, several years before Security Pacific National Bank decided to keep its headquarters downtown on Spring Street rather than moving west to mid-Wilshire, and 15 years before the completion of the Los Angeles Music Center.
OPINION
August 5, 2012
Re "Old shop reveals an L.A. treasure," Column One, Aug. 2 In the late 1950s I worked at the Security Bank at 5th and Spring streets in downtown L.A. The Dutch Chocolate Shop (which was open then but under another name that I can't remember) was our favorite spot for a morning or afternoon break. I knew nothing of tile maker Ernest Batchelder then, but I thought his creation was cute and different. One night I was driving by and saw workers hosing down the interior (all chairs and tables were on the sidewalk)
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Nope, the incredibly tenacious cupcake trend isn't going away -- not if the lines at the new Sprinkles Cupcakes at the Grove are any indication. Now Sprinkles Cupcakes, the frosting-covered, quickly expanding empire begat by Candace Nelson (largely credited for spawning "the cupcake craze"), is opening its 12th location. A new Sprinkles outpost will debut at downtown Los Angeles' Figat7th shopping complex. The new store is set to open its doors on Wednesday at 9 a.m. and is baking "Golden Tickets" into 10 of its cupcakes -- each found ticket is worth a $100 Sprinkles gift card.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Sandwiched between Los Angeles and Main streets off a tiny road called Winston, the new downtown L.A. club the Lash may be situated off an alley, but from there any sense of place starts feeling a little fuzzy. A glowing door in a wall painted with diagonal black-and-white strips leads to a small set of steps that take you to the club's main bar. Inside, walls made of smashed white subway tiles, modern modular furniture, off-kilter mirrors and bleacher seating create an oddly cold but inviting minimalist space.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013 | By Joe Flint
The man who came up with the phrase "beautiful downtown Burbank" is not happy that NBC is considering moving "The Tonight Show" back to New York City. "Burbank is a great little place," said Gary Owens, who coined the phrase from his radio days then made it famous when he was the announcer on "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In" from 1968 to 1973. "If you are in show business in any way, shape or form, you must be here. "  Johnny Carson, who moved "The Tonight Show" from New York to Los Angeles in 1972, also used the "beautiful downtown Burbank" line but never tried to take credit for it. PHOTOS: Classic 'Tonight Show' moments "He said, 'We're using "beautiful downtown Burbank," and I told him, 'That's fine - not a problem,'" Owens recalled.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2002
Anastasia McAteer writes that "it's disappointing that after so much good press, downtown is still perceived so incorrectly by the majority of Los Angeles, and people continue to perpetuate the 'ghost town at sundown' stereotype" (Letters, Sept. 1). Spare me the political correctness. I worked in downtown Los Angeles for well over two years (at the bottom of Bunker Hill, 5th and Grand), and found it to be appalling, depressing and disgusting. If downtown is so convenient, as McAteer asserts, how come there is no food to be had on downtown's streets between 3 and 7 p.m.?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2013 | By Gale Holland
Private security patrols and cleanup crews have pulled out of the downtown Los Angeles' Arts District after a court ordered the city to dissolve a special district that had assessed property owners as much as $1.3 million a year to spruce up and protect the neighborhood. L.A. County Superior Court Judge Joanne O'Donnell ruled that the city had improperly approved the area's business improvement district, or BID, spending money on public relations activities including business recruitment tours and hanging street banners as well as cleaning and guard services.
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