Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDracula
IN THE NEWS

Dracula

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1999
Kenneth Turan was generous in his review of UCLA's staging of "Dracula" when he said ". . . there was clearly no time to get things aurally right for Royce [Hall], and that was a shame" ("Live Musical Accompaniment Drains 'Dracula' of Its Scariness," Nov. 1). "A shame" is a major understatement! The soundtrack was completely unintelligible. I was outraged at having spent $40 per ticket for a presentation lasting one hour and 15 minutes, and being unable to understand much of the film's dialogue.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Annlee Ellingson
Less about vampires than deals with the devil, "The Impaler" draws not on "Dracula" but the historical figure who inspired Bram Stoker's iconic bloodsucker: Vlad III, a vicious 15th century Crusader known for impaling his victims. Seven friends who look far too old to be celebrating their high school graduation book a week's stay in the notorious Romanian's Transylvania castle. But it takes just one night before they start getting picked off one by one in manners relegated to off-screen.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
When Genndy Tartakovsky came aboard to direct "Hotel Transylvania," the computer-animated 3-D comedy about Dracula operating a resort for monsters, he brought something unique to the table: a decidedly old-fashioned aesthetic. Tartakovsky comes from a traditional 2-D animation background, having created the Cartoon Network shows "Dexter's Laboratory" and "Samurai Jack," and the Moscow-born director is an avowed film of the zany, cartoonish sensibility of animators like Chuck Jones and Tex Avery (both of whom worked on "Looney Tunes," among others)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
It is a little late to be worrying much over the body of Dracula. From pulp he came and to pulp he shall forever return. For every serious or even vaguely faithful take on the 1897 Bram Stoker novel - Browning, Murnau, Coppola, Herzog, et al. - there must be 20 or 30 instances where the character is turned to daffier uses. He has been Hammer House of Horrored, Mad Monster Partied, Mel Brooksed, George Hamiltoned, Abbott and Costelloed and Scooby-Dooed from here to Romania and back.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
NBC is adding three new dramas to its 2013-14 lineup: "The Blacklist," "Ironside" and "Dracula. " "The Blacklist," which will air at 10 p.m. Mondays, stars James Spader, formerly of "Boston Legal," "The Practice" and "The Office. " The show is a crime drama and was one of the highest-testing pilots for any network this year. "Ironside" will air at 10 p.m. Wednesdays and stars another established actor, Blair Underwood. It's a remake of a 1970s detective drama, but there are murmurs that the fact that Underwood is 48 years old might make the show skew older, which isn't as appealing to advertisers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan
Every film fan has seen Tod Browning's classic 1931 vampire opera "Dracula," starring Bela Lugosi as the dread count, but not everyone knows that when the English-speaking cast went home for the night, Spanish-speaking actors took over the set and made a version in that language for export to Latin America. It's at least the equal of the Browning version, some say even spookier, and those who check it out on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. at Cinefamily (611 N. Fairfax Ave.) will be in for another great treat.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1992
I want to make some comments regarding Kenneth Turan's review, " 'Dracula': Letting the Blood Flow" (Nov. 13): First, I resent any movie reviewer who foists preconceived notions on a film. It seemed inevitable that Turan would dislike the film, what with worries about the purity of Francis Ford Coppola's motives in making "Dracula"--"What he wanted was the kind of hit that would enable him to get financing for one of those close-to-the-heart films"--and an obvious disgust for its cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
NBC will be bringing "Dracula" to audiences Friday nights in the fall. Today the network put the official preview of the show online, just in advance of the Upfronts, the multi-network previews for media writers and television critics. "Dracula" has a number of things going for it, including actor Jonathan Rhys Meyers, a director from "The Tudors" and producers from "Downton Abbey. " There are fancy costumes, dramatic lighting and, if the trailer is any measure, a very gothy atmosphere.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2009 | Leslie S. Klinger, Klinger is editor of "The New Annotated Dracula" and "The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes."
Dracula The Un-Dead Dacre Stoker and Ian Holt Dutton: 424 pp., $26.95 The ending of Bram Stoker's "Dracula" (1897) has long troubled readers. Professor Abraham Van Helsing, the Dutch expert on the supernatural, repeatedly admonishes his band of hunters that to kill the vampire-king, they must "cut off his head and burn his heart or drive a stake through it." Furthermore, he warns, when the sun sets, Dracula has the power to transform himself into "elemental dust." With that in mind, what occurs after an extended chase from England to Dracula's castle in Transylvania is puzzling: As the sun sets, Jonathan Harker and Quincey Morris attack Dracula with steel knives, one "shear[ing]
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
It is a little late to be worrying much over the body of Dracula. From pulp he came and to pulp he shall forever return. For every serious or even vaguely faithful take on the 1897 Bram Stoker novel - Browning, Murnau, Coppola, Herzog, et al. - there must be 20 or 30 instances where the character is turned to daffier uses. He has been Hammer House of Horrored, Mad Monster Partied, Mel Brooksed, George Hamiltoned, Abbott and Costelloed and Scooby-Dooed from here to Romania and back.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The Returned" (Sundance Channel, Thursdays) . A French miniseries in eight parts, based on a 2004 film of the same French name ("Les Revenants") but a different English one ("They Came Back"). The word "zombie" is often mentioned in press for the series, in which several characters, deceased, of different ages and dates of death, return to a small French mountain town -- confused but, unlike your average zombie, with their mental faculties intact and physically none the worse for wear.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
"The Good Wife": "Hit the Fan," the episode we've all been waiting for, in which Will (Josh Charles) reacts to Alicia's (Julianna Margulies) decision to leave Lockhart & Gardner to start another firm with colleague Cary (Matt Czuchry) has finally come due. "The Good Wife," now into its fifth season, is unarguably the best drama on a broadcast network and one of the best dramas on television, full stop. Year after year (married) creators Michelle King and Robert King have overseen a miraculous combination of character drama and legal procedural.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | By Katherine Tulich
This is not your great-great grandfather's Dracula. It's NBC's - and that means in this lush, re-imagined world, the mysterious count made famous in Bram Stoker's 1897 classic now has washboard abs, is posing as an American (vampire) in London, and is a complicated antihero. The new series, which premieres Friday and seems to have shed any lingering gothic inhibitions about sex, blood and gore, stars the brooding Irish actor Jonathan Rhys Meyers. "I guess it was inevitable with my looks I would be asked to play a vampire one day," Rhys Meyers says with a laugh on the phone from his North London home.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Conventional wisdom holds that Dario Argento, maker of such classics as "Suspiria" and "Deep Red," has been running on fumes for years now. But his latest, "Argento's Dracula 3D," has enough going for it besides its alphabetically VOD-friendly title to prove that the Italian horror and suspense maestro shouldn't be entirely counted out. At his best, Argento has a subversive wit and sinister perveyness somewhat analogous to that of photographer Helmut...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan
Every film fan has seen Tod Browning's classic 1931 vampire opera "Dracula," starring Bela Lugosi as the dread count, but not everyone knows that when the English-speaking cast went home for the night, Spanish-speaking actors took over the set and made a version in that language for export to Latin America. It's at least the equal of the Browning version, some say even spookier, and those who check it out on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. at Cinefamily (611 N. Fairfax Ave.) will be in for another great treat.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
NBC will be bringing "Dracula" to audiences Friday nights in the fall. Today the network put the official preview of the show online, just in advance of the Upfronts, the multi-network previews for media writers and television critics. "Dracula" has a number of things going for it, including actor Jonathan Rhys Meyers, a director from "The Tudors" and producers from "Downton Abbey. " There are fancy costumes, dramatic lighting and, if the trailer is any measure, a very gothy atmosphere.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2012 | By Dale Bailey
When Mary Shelley wrote "Frankenstein" in 1816, she could not have conceived of the cultural landmark it would become. The novel still throws a long shadow across the popular imagination almost two centuries later. Boris Karloff's performance as the monster in Universal's 1931 film has become iconic, and his is merely one among dozens of adaptations and revisions to come: movies, plays, novels, comic books, even breakfast cereals (remember Franken Berry?). Which brings us to Dave Zeltserman's "Monster" (Overlook: 224 pp., $23.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2004 | Jan Breslauer, Special to The Times
It's gloomy and gray, and the rain is coming down in sheets. An ominous crash of low-rumbling thunder resounds outside. An even more ominous crash of indeterminate origin resounds within the Belasco Theater, where technical rehearsals for "Dracula, the Musical" are underway. The atmosphere on this mid-July day is grim and gothic, in keeping with the 1897 Bram Stoker novel on which the musical is based.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
NBC is adding three new dramas to its 2013-14 lineup: "The Blacklist," "Ironside" and "Dracula. " "The Blacklist," which will air at 10 p.m. Mondays, stars James Spader, formerly of "Boston Legal," "The Practice" and "The Office. " The show is a crime drama and was one of the highest-testing pilots for any network this year. "Ironside" will air at 10 p.m. Wednesdays and stars another established actor, Blair Underwood. It's a remake of a 1970s detective drama, but there are murmurs that the fact that Underwood is 48 years old might make the show skew older, which isn't as appealing to advertisers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
When Genndy Tartakovsky came aboard to direct "Hotel Transylvania," the computer-animated 3-D comedy about Dracula operating a resort for monsters, he brought something unique to the table: a decidedly old-fashioned aesthetic. Tartakovsky comes from a traditional 2-D animation background, having created the Cartoon Network shows "Dexter's Laboratory" and "Samurai Jack," and the Moscow-born director is an avowed film of the zany, cartoonish sensibility of animators like Chuck Jones and Tex Avery (both of whom worked on "Looney Tunes," among others)
Los Angeles Times Articles
|