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Dracula

NEWS
August 27, 1992 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bringing the "Mash" to Moorpark: Bobby "Boris" Pickett rose to world fame as the performer and co-writer of "Monster Mash." A No. 1 single in 1962, the record has become a perennial, as identified with Oct. 31 as "Easter Parade" and "White Christmas" are with their own holidays. Pickett is the Guy Lombardo of Halloween. Home video fans can spot Pickett in the recent sci-fi parody "Lobster Man from Mars" (where he appears with Tony Curtis, Patrick Macnee and Billy Barty).
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1992
The photo caption with Film Flips Jan. 26 states "Bela Lugosi, the original film Dracula . . ." is misleading and incorrect. The Max Schreck as Nosferatu original Dracula ("Nosferatu") from Bram Stoker's Gothic novel, was produced and directed in 1922 in Germany by F. W. Murnau, a silent starring Max Schreck who made Lugosi look tame in comparison. OLIVER BERLINER Beverly Hills Dracula is the most popular character in the movie horror genre, with 160 appearances and counting.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1992
Having been a publicist himself--for actor Sir Henry Irving--Bram (Abraham) Stoker must be chuckling in his bier over all the current coverage of Dracula. AL HIX Hollywood
BOOKS
October 28, 1990 | Kenneth Turan.
HOLLYWOOD GOTHIC by David J. Skal (W. W. Norton: $39.95). "I am . . . Dracula," Bela Lugosi announced to the world as only he could in Todd Browning's 1931 vampire epic, and the Hollywood horror film was born. But, as author Skal points out in this witty, comprehensive look at "the tangled web of Dracula from novel to stage to screen," the lure of the vampire began before Bela and bids fair to continue on long after his passing. Skal introduces us to Bram Stoker, the book's muddled author, and Florence, the protective widow who became obsessed with systematically destroying all copies of "Nosferatu," the classic German vampire film.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2001
While I didn't love "Dracula," I did enjoy myself, mostly due to the talents of director Des McAnuff and scenic designer John Arnone ("Money Talks; It May Not Sing," by Michael Phillips, Nov. 25). I don't, however, agree with Phillips' assessment of Frank Wildhorn. I found the book and lyrics to the show (not by Wildhorn) to be ridiculously amateurish and often just really bad. I shouldn't have been surprised, considering it was the same "Sunset Boulevard" writers that brought us the song "Let's Do Lunch" (which was later changed to "Let's Have Lunch" when they found out that people didn't "do" lunch back then)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2010
SERIES Smallville: The Daily Planet hires Kat Grant (Keri Lynn Pratt) to fill in after Lois (Erica Durance) departs for Egypt, in this new episode (8 p.m. KTLA). Human Target: After he and Guerrero (Jackie Earle Haley) race to rescue the kidnapped Winston (Chi McBride), an eager-to-retire Chance (Mark Valley) is lured back into the security business by a billionaire philanthropist (Indira Varma) who needs his protection, in the season premiere (8 p.m. Fox). CSI: NY: When a young woman appears to have been strangled while participating in an anonymous Internet chat, the team must determine if it was a hoax or murder in this new episode (9 p.m. CBS)
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