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Dracula

ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1992 | Michael Wilmington
Through the years, there have been many film Draculas. Here are some of the best, most memorable and silliest. . . Nosferatu (1922). Still the greatest movie ever derived from "Dracula," F.W. Murnau's free adaptation--written by Henrik Galeen ("The Golem")--shifts the locale to Bremen, renames the characters (Dracula is Orlok, Harker is Hutter), and adds a horrific plague as the climax.
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NEWS
April 2, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A Dracula theme park in Transylvania has attracted enough investment for the project to go ahead, the Romanian government said. Investors have bought $2.9 million worth of stock, more than 60% of what is needed by law for the project to proceed, Tourism Minister Dan Matei Agathon said. The park is to be built in Sighisoara, hometown of 15th century Prince Vlad the Impaler, who inspired Bram Stoker's "Dracula." It will have rides, a golf course, a Gothic castle and shops.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1993
When the program formally lists a credit for "Rat construction," you're in for a different evening. The rats appear in a prison scene impaled on little sticks. That's the least of the horrors in "Dracula Tyrannus, the Tragical History of Vlad the Impaler" at the Tiffany. The production--awash in severed heads, mutilated bodies and disembowelments--is not camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1987 | HERMAN WONG, Times Staff Writer
Orange County's new Way Off Broadway theater company makes its debut tonight with "Dracula--A Halloween Haunt." "What better bloodthirsty saga at Halloween time?" asks Tony Reverditto, the troupe's founder-director. "This Dracula will surprise people, because it's a more updated version. But we promise a full range of chills and fun." The play, by John Mattera, will run through Sunday and Wednesday through Oct. 30 at 8 p.m., with a special 9 p.m. performance Oct. 31 at 1058 E. First St.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1987 | NANCY CHURNIN
Idols may come and go in this fickle, star-starved world, but our monsters are always with us. Consider the enduring appeal of Frankenstein and Dracula, both subjects of world premieres in San Diego this year. Frankenstein's emergence in San Diego City College's "Monstrum" may not have been entirely successful, but it was provocative--a sympathetic portrayal of the creature who hated in revenge for being denied love.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1992 | DAVID J. FOX
Weekend estimates of a $32-million gross for Francis Ford Coppola's "Bram Stoker's Dracula" fell to $30 million when the final tally came in on Monday, but it made no difference in its ranking as the year's third-biggest opening and biggest-ever non-summer premiere. Thanks largely to "Dracula," box-office grosses were roughly double the same weekend a year ago.
TRAVEL
February 12, 1989 | CLAUDIA R. CAPOS, Capos is a free-lance writer who lives in Ann Arbor, Mich
Dracula has been rediscovered in Transylvania. Visitors who travel to this ancient province in central Romania in search of Dracula's roots are never really sure, however, whether the elusive figure they are pursuing is fact or fiction. There were actually two Draculas--one a man, the other a myth. The Romanians, in an effort to accommodate the demands of foreign tourists, have given them a little bit of both.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2000 | DAVID CHUTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Wes Craven Presents Dracula 2000" is this film's official title, and it has a nice ring to it, seeming to promise a sly and subversive updating of one of the horror genre's pivotal myths. This is not exactly a minty fresh idea; bolder movies than this one, from David Cronenberg's "Rabid" (1977) to Abel Ferrera's "The Addiction" (1995), have deployed vampirism as a metaphor for, respectively, venereal disease and drug dependency.
NEWS
January 4, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Manners, stage and film actor best remembered as the quarry for Bela Lugosi's "Dracula" in 1931, has died. He was 98. Manners died Dec. 23 at a retirement care facility in Santa Barbara. Horror films, he once said, were his "only claim to fame." He actually made about three dozen motion pictures during the 1930s, most frequently as the handsome romantic lead, and appeared regularly on stages throughout Canada and the United States in the 1920s to 1940s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After "Nosferatu," UC Irvine's recent spectacular mix of theater with F.W. Murnau's "Dracula"-themed silent film, and especially after Francis Coppola's bloody film spectacle "Bram Stoker's Dracula," the last thing anyone wants is a boring stage version of the story. But Charles Mitchell's adaptation at Golden West College is a model of how expository dialogue does not a drama make. At some points, his staging unintentionally turns this nightmare into a comedy.
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