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Draft Military

NEWS
October 11, 1992 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The military draft--it hung forebodingly over the young men of the 1960s, and it shadows them yet today, those graying fathers of the 1990s. "Maybe the person who didn't go to Vietnam was smarter than I was. People who didn't go were thinking people, and they knew it was a no-win situation"--Jim MacLeod, a Kentucky businessman and military veteran of 12 years. "Most anybody who had a brain tried to get out of the war.
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NEWS
October 11, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Dan Quayle attacked Bill Clinton's credibility and character on Saturday, but stressed he was not suggesting that the Democratic presidential nominee's opposition to the Vietnam War was unpatriotic. At an airport news conference, Quayle said the Arkansas governor "simply doesn't tell the truth" about the extent of his involvement in anti-war protests during his days as a Rhodes scholar in England or about his efforts to avoid the draft.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton acknowledged Saturday that he made an effort to have his Army induction notice canceled in the summer of 1969, but he insisted he had no recollection of seeking the assistance of two influential Republicans. "Whatever the rules were, I followed them," Clinton said. "I don't remember whether I did it by mail or by meeting, but whatever the rules were at the time, I followed the established procedures."
NEWS
September 26, 1992 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton, who has said he did not pull strings to avoid the Vietnam-era draft, was able to get his Army induction notice canceled in the summer of 1969 after a lobbying effort directed at the Republican head of the state draft agency. Two former GOP aides--including the then-head of the state party--said they arranged for him to plead his case personally to Col. Willard A. (Lefty) Hawkins, director of the state Selective Service office.
NEWS
September 26, 1992 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the draft issue that soured the friendship of Cliff Jackson and Bill Clinton back in the fall of 1969--an episode of no public note at the time, but one that would echo through a presidential campaign nearly a quarter-century later. Jackson, then a Republican activist, and the already politically ambitious Clinton had become classmates at Oxford University in the fall of 1968. They were teammates on the university's "B" basketball team.
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his toughest, most direct attack yet on Bill Clinton's draft record, President Bush said Monday that his Democratic opponent "has not told the full truth, the whole truth, nothing but the truth" about how he avoided military service. And, questioning Clinton's view of the military, Bush said: "The commander in chief shouldn't have a mind-set that says the military is immoral."
NEWS
September 21, 1992 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Dan Quayle acknowledged Sunday that joining the National Guard in 1969 had sharply reduced his chances of being sent to Vietnam, but he insisted that avoidance of military service should not be an issue in the presidential election. "Obviously, if you join the National Guard, you have less of a chance of going to Vietnam," Quayle said on NBC-TV's "Meet the Press." "I mean, that goes without saying."
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as he was endorsed Saturday by a former leader of the nation's military, Democratic presidential nominee Bill Clinton faced sharp new questions about the extent of his efforts to avoid the draft half a lifetime ago. With four-star Navy Adm. William J. Crowe Jr., the retired chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, at his side, Clinton disputed a new report that he sought special treatment as he tried to avoid the draft during the Vietnam War by calling on the office of then-Sen. William J.
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a calculated one-two assault, President Bush and his aides on Thursday used language laden with images of duplicity and the welfare state in an intensified bid to convince Americans that they can neither trust nor afford to put Bill Clinton in the White House.
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The continuing questions about Democratic presidential nominee Bill Clinton's Vietnam War draft status have had no measurable effect on his standing in several published polls. But senior campaign aides admit the controversy has had a dramatic impact on Clinton's campaign at a level polls do not measure: time, attention and focus.
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