Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDrastic Measures
IN THE NEWS

Drastic Measures

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
November 27, 2007
Re "Planning, weather were among the fire breaks," Nov. 26 Listening to the ongoing TV news of the latest fire in Malibu, I heard that many homes were burned despite pre-positioning of firefighter strike crews. Seems like minutes really do matter. Why not request the government provide instant warning of any hot spots in our Southern California area during fire season via its network of infrared heat-sensing satellites?
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 31, 2011 | By Lisa Dillman
Clippers forward Craig Smith , who hasn't played since Dec. 18, should get a good read on his progress when he visits the doctor Wednesday. Smith suffered a herniated disk in his lower back and nerve damage in his right leg, which required an epidural. If all is deemed to be going well, Smith won't require more drastic measures. "The way I'm feeling, I feel close," he said Monday before the Clippers played Milwaukee at Staples Center. "Hopefully, no surgery. I don't wish that on anybody.
Advertisement
SPORTS
September 6, 1995 | STEVE KRESAL
It's a sure bet the players on the five Orange County community college football teams have had enough of practicing and are ready to start the season. There's also little doubt the coaches--especially at Golden West, Orange Coast and Saddleback--are in a hurry to get under way. While Rancho Santiago and Fullerton had outstanding seasons and reached bowl games, the other three teams had a miserable time. Golden West went 2-6-2, the worst mark in the college's 29-year history.
WORLD
January 17, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
In a small stucco pavilion built as a urology clinic -- one of the few buildings in the hospital complex deemed structurally sound -- patient after patient was wheeled into the makeshift operating room on an old bed Saturday. Workers doused the walls with disinfectant as a couple of nurses prepped the wounded and gave them a bit of anesthesia. Then out came the saws. The work was amputations. On the grounds of the heavily damaged General Hospital, a mass of injured people, some with crudely severed limbs, moaned or stared vacantly as they waited for care by a team of Haitian and foreign doctors.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
Carrying what possessions they could, hundreds of thousands of Chinese villagers turned their backs Friday on homes that will be sacrificed to the raging waters of the Yangtze River if authorities resort to drastic measures to keep flooding at bay. With the river at record levels and rising, officials were preparing to open floodgates and, if that failed, blow up a dike to divert the swollen waters from one of the most threatened sections of the 3,900-mile waterway.
NEWS
November 2, 1986 | EDUARDO GALLARDO, Associated Press
Scientists are calling this Andean capital one of the most polluted places on Earth and warning of the need for drastic measures to avoid an ecological catastrophe. Respiratory diseases are becoming common among the city's 4.5 million people, doctors say, especially among high-risk groups--the elderly, children under 5 and people with heart ailments.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hope struggled with skepticism here Thursday as Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto vowed to take "drastic" measures to revive Japan's economy and purge its festering bad debts. But wary investors wondered whether a government they see as dithering and ineffectual will deliver on its latest promises. The Japanese stock market soared 4.4% and the yen rose to 136.7 to the dollar following the U.S. announcement Wednesday that it had intervened to stop the freefall of the Japanese currency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The children brandishing signs, the dire speeches and the honks from supportive drivers passing by were reminiscent of the massive anti-malathion demonstrations here in weeks past. But on Thursday, a smaller crowd of only about 100 protesters battling the area's third pesticide dousing told a different story.
MAGAZINE
April 26, 1992
Newkirk's methods are controversial but effective. Sometimes drastic measures are necessary to create reasonable change. BOB AND RAE LYON RADABAUGH Burbank
NEWS
April 14, 1985
In the March 31 View story, Jack Hawn's "The Golfing Life" quoted Dinah Shore as knowing of no other private golf club than Hillcrest County Club, to which she belongs, that grants membership to single women. Miss Shore will be heartened to learn that the Woodland Hills Country Club has had an open policy since at least 1975 with no quotas--and no rejection of such applicants. We now have 10 such ladies with golfing memberships, seven of whom own equity in the club with voting rights.
HEALTH
May 25, 2009
Re: your April 27 article "Electronic Records Have People Abuzz. What's the Reality?" I would like to suggest that there needs to be a cross-check system for electronic records. A few years ago, I had a physician treating me for symptoms that were hard to pin down to a single diagnosis. Based on medical records in my name that the physician had on his laptop, he prescribed a medication that had potentially serious negative effects on vision. While I filled the prescription, as a good patient would do, I delayed taking the medication because I read of possible consequences and I really did not feel that my medical condition required such drastic measures.
WORLD
May 10, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman
Michel Hattar's father was a priest in Jerusalem in 1947 when word arrived from the rocky Jordanian hills that he must renounce his vows and marry to protect his tribe's land and inheritances. He did as he was told. He broke from the holy order he had known for 20 years to wed the bride picked by his family, his first cousin, Widad.
SPORTS
November 3, 2008 | Jerry Crowe
Former coach Barry Melrose says it cost the Kings their one legitimate chance at a Stanley Cup championship. The Hockey Hall of Fame would love to display it. Marty McSorley won't discuss it. McSorley, whose use of an illegal stick served as the defining moment in the Montreal Canadiens' championship series triumph over the Kings in 1993, declines even to reveal the shady stick's whereabouts. "Tell your editor," the former defenseman says, "I wouldn't tell you."
OPINION
November 27, 2007
Re "Planning, weather were among the fire breaks," Nov. 26 Listening to the ongoing TV news of the latest fire in Malibu, I heard that many homes were burned despite pre-positioning of firefighter strike crews. Seems like minutes really do matter. Why not request the government provide instant warning of any hot spots in our Southern California area during fire season via its network of infrared heat-sensing satellites?
WORLD
October 17, 2005 | From Associated Press
Authorities killed thousands of domestic fowl Sunday in eastern Romania, hoping to prevent the spread of a deadly strain of bird flu that has decimated flocks and killed more than 60 people in Asia. Officials said they were awaiting test results from a British laboratory on samples from birds found dead in Maliuc, a village about 20 miles from the village of Ceamurlia de Jos, where the H5N1 virus was first detected in Romania.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2005 | John Geluardi and Lee Romney, Special to The Times
At a packed hearing Tuesday night, council members of this bayside community of 100,000 considered declaring a state of emergency in hopes that it would bolster their demands for state and federal aid to stem a wave of gun violence sweeping the city. Officials were also expected to approve $1.9 million in local expenditures to put more police officers on the street, mount hidden cameras in neighborhoods plagued by drug dealers, and seek injunctions against gang members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2001
Re "State Barely Escapes Day of Blackouts," Jan. 12: It's inconceivable that this great progressive state that is the envy of the world could allow this man-made crisis to occur. Natural disasters will occur, and we respond with great speed and resources. Our state has the most informed and talented populace in the U.S. Yet here we find ourselves with a debacle. Gov. Gray Davis needs to take a few lessons from former President Harry Truman: "The buck stops here." For once, forget about the votes and do what is right.
NEWS
July 17, 1986
The wise, esteemed city leaders of Glendale have taken it upon themselves to banish hot-dog vendors on the streets, outlaw readable signs on Brand Boulevard, dictate what kind of fences residents may put up, and now (Glendale section, June 26), we learn, to have the final say on architects' plans for any new building project in the city. That is all well and good. But City Council members have overlooked an important obstacle to their beautification efforts, an obstacle which threatens to undermine all their good work.
NATIONAL
December 22, 2003 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
After five years of distressingly low rain and snowfall, a drought is hammering the West harder than ever, causing multibillion-dollar economic losses and prompting unprecedented measures in many states to cope with less water. With the start of winter, little optimism exists that the coming months will fix the problems. Weather forecasts are equivocal.
NEWS
March 17, 2002 | JOSEPH B. VERRENGIA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Every time the backhoe bites into the hard, dry prairie of the All American Antler Ranch, Craig McConnell winces as if the iron claw was ripping open his own belly. Seven hundred tawny elk cluster beneath a blue horizon that seems to reach into forever, like the ocean. The animals fidget as the machine growls and the hole grows deeper, wider. McConnell takes a blind step backward and stumbles against bundles of fence posts.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|