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NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Immigration advocates cheered across Maryland as the state's voters approved a “Dream Act” ballot initiative that allows some illegal immigrant students to pay in-state tuition rates to attend college. The measure passed, 57% to 43%, with large majorities in Montgomery and Prince George's counties and narrowly meeting majority approval in Baltimore County. The initiative, called Question 4, says undocumented students can attend community college as long as students graduate from high school and meet income tax, permanent residency and selective service registration requirements.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Two Long Beach colleges are among 12 nationally that will offer scholarships to low-income students who are in this country illegally and not eligible for federal financial aid, officials announced Tuesday. Long Beach City College and Cal State Long Beach are participating in the new national program called TheDream.US, an initiative launched by several prominent philanthropists. The name refers to the federal Dream Act, which would offer a pathway to citizenship for the estimated 1.7 million young people brought to the country illegally as children.
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NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
As President Obama works to restart the immigration debate, congressional Democrats on Wednesday reintroduced the proposed Dream Act, long-sought legislation that would provide children who were brought to the U.S. illegally a route to citizenship if they pursue a college education or military service. Senate Democratic leaders said they intend to hold a vote on the bill, even though the legislation fell short of passage last year after most Republicans and a handful of Democrats opposed its advance in that chamber.
NATIONAL
August 10, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - When a group of young immigrant rights activists devised a plan last month to stage an unconventional protest at the U.S.-Mexico border to draw attention to the thousands deported under the Obama administration's immigration policy, Lizbeth Mateo was a little afraid that onlookers would react negatively. The protest, after all, could have meant their deportation. Then the letters poured in. Hundreds of them. All positive and addressed to Mateo, 29, and other protesters who, as a result of their daring demonstration, were stopped, handcuffed and taken to an immigration detention facility in south-central Arizona.
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - Under political pressure to take action on immigration reform, three Republican senators introduced an alternative version of the Dream Act on Tuesday that would give legal status for young immigrants brought to the U.S. unlawfully as children. The effort, called the Achieve Act and launched by retiring senators Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.) and Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) and supported by Arizona senator John McCain, appears to be a push to take some of the heat off of Republicans on immigration.
OPINION
June 20, 2012
When the Obama administration decided last week to temporarily suspend the deportation of some young undocumented immigrants, Republicans in Congress threw a fit, complaining that such decisions should be made by Congress, not by unilateral presidential action. But what else was President Obama to do? Republicans have long had the ability to legislate a lasting fix to the problem but have repeatedly failed to do so. Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, who has been crafting a conservative version of the so-called Dream Act, immediately criticized the president for "going around Congress," and he told the Wall Street Journal that he would not proceed with his own bill because of the administration's decision to act first.
OPINION
September 20, 2010 | By Peter Schrag
The chances that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid can deliver on his promise to move the so-called DREAM Act toward passage in the Senate this week range from slim to none. But the announcement that it would be added as an amendment to the Defense Department authorization bill has energized pro-immigrant groups, even as it underlines the fact that there'll be no comprehensive immigration reform any time in the near future. Not this year, certainly, and probably not next year either.
OPINION
May 20, 2012
Re "Court takes up bid of illegal immigrant to be attorney," May 17 Sergio Garcia, an undocumented immigrant who passed the State Bar of California exams to practice law, is a perfect example of someone who would benefit from a federal Dream Act. Not only is he a model citizen, he's a smart one too. Why should this young man wait up to 15 years to become legal and then a lawyer? He should be admitted to the bar now, and a certificate of citizenship should be attached.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - Part-time college student Ray Jose arrived at Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin's office this week with an overriding goal: To convince the West Virginia Democrat to back off his proposal to stiffen the educational requirements in the Dream Act section of the bipartisan immigration bill. The Dream Act is among the more popular, and less contested, parts of the Senate immigration overhaul - a provision that would allow young people who were brought to the United States as minors to receive green cards more swiftly if they serve in the military or attend college.
NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Brian Bennett
Despite entrenched opposition in Congress to immigration reform, President Obama in the State of the Union speech asked both chambers to resurrect the Dream Act, a bill that would create a path to citizenship for young illegal immigrants who are college students and military service members. He also encouraged lawmakers to increase the number of visas for highly skilled immigrants, many of whom complete graduate degrees in the U.S. but are not authorized to work here. The U.S. currently awards about 140,000 highly skilled visas per year.
OPINION
August 7, 2013
Nine young men and women whose parents brought them to the United States as children without proper documentation were arrested last month after staging a bold protest. By traveling to Mexico and then trying to legally reenter the U.S., they hoped to highlight the plight of an estimated 1.7 million young immigrants who also came to the U.S. as children -- and to press for passage of the Dream Act, which would offer them a conditional pathway to citizenship. The nine protesters took a huge risk.
NATIONAL
August 7, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - Young immigrants known as the “Dream 9” were released Wednesday from federal custody in Arizona, a small step in their bid to win asylum in the United States.   The immigration activists were released on parole, which allows them to return to their American communities until they get the chance to argue for asylum before an immigration judge. The nine were tranferred by bus from the Eloy Detention Center in south-central Arizona to Tucson, where their arrival was welcomed by immigrant rights activists.
NATIONAL
August 7, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - Lizbeth Mateo won't be late for her first day of law school after all - despite weeks in a federal detention center after protesting U.S. immigration policy. She and other members of the "Dream 9" were freed Wednesday while they pursue U.S. asylum. Born in Mexico, Mateo, 29, has spent most of her life in Los Angeles. On Monday, she is to begin studies at Santa Clara University School of Law. Now she's even more determined to succeed. "I am absolutely ready to go to law school," Mateo said.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
PHOENIX - Young immigrants known as the “Dream 9” will get the chance to argue their case for asylum before an immigration judge, potentially setting a precedent that would inspire other Mexican nationals to make similar claims for asylum in the U.S, immigration experts said Tuesday. The five women and four men, who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children, staged an unconventional and risky protest last month at the U.S.-Mexico border to spotlight the thousands of people deported under the Obama administration.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
With public disapproval of the House of Representatives hovering somewhere around 77%, John Oliver joked on Wednesday's “Daily Show” that "Congress" is about to become “the English language's most offensive C-word.” And the House's do-nothing reputation isn't likely to improve, he argued, given that Republican leaders have refused to vote on a comprehensive immigration reform bill already approved with bipartisan support by...
NATIONAL
July 23, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - Two years ago, House Republicans would not hear of the Dream Act, rejecting as a "nightmare" the legislation to provide a path to citizenship for immigrants who were brought to the country as children and were here illegally as young adults. Now, they're taking a second look. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) is working on his own version, which some Republicans hope can bridge the divide separating the parties on the immigration overhaul, which has languished in the GOP-led House.
OPINION
July 3, 2010
Nightmare in Hesperia Re "Undone by their dreams," June 27, and "A steep fall for a suburban idyll," June 28 Thank you for your incredible story about the Meenan family, who lost their home in Hesperia. For one of the few times in more than 50 years of reading newspapers, I actually got choked up. My wife and I moved to the Golden State from Pennsylvania in 2001, and were considering buying a place in the high desert due to affordability when we lucked out and found a reasonably priced home in a senior community in Oceanside.
HEALTH
January 1, 2012 | By James Oliphant
Republican presidential front-runner Mitt Romney has pledged to veto the so-called DREAM Act, which would provide a path to citizenship for children of illegal immigrants if they attend college or serve in the military. Romney made the comments during a late campaign stop New Year's Eve in northwestern Iowa. “The answer is yes,” he said, when asked if he would veto the legislation if Congress passes it and he is in the White House. Romney said, however, that he would support granting children of illegal immigrants some form of residency in exchange for military service.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON   - The Republican-led House voted along party lines Thursday to prohibit funding for President Obama's Dream Act-styled program, which temporarily halts the deportations of young immigrants if they have served in the military or are attending college. The 224-201 vote underscored the resistance of House Republicans to the immigration overhaul that has gained momentum in the Senate. The amendment was proposed by Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa), who is among the chamber's most hardened opponents of a path to citizenship for the estimated 11 million people living in the country without legal status.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | By Michael McGough
The Times on Thursday editorialized in favor of a bill in Congress that would call on states to review laws that criminalize conduct by people infected by HIV. While the bill itself may be worthy, its title is an example of an obnoxious trend. Our editorial refers to the legislation, introduced by Reps. Barbara Lee (D-Oakland) and Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.), as the Repeal HIV Discrimination Act of 2013. But “Repeal” should actually be spelled “REPEAL” because it's an acronym for “Repeal Existing Policies that Encourage and Allow Legal HIV Discrimination Act.” OK, you have to toss out the words “HIV Discrimination Act,” but you get the idea.
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