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BUSINESS
February 15, 2011 | Michael Hiltzik
The biggest mistake people make when talking about the outsourcing of U.S. jobs by U.S. companies is to treat it as a moral issue. Sure, it's immoral to abandon your loyal American workers in search of cheap labor overseas. But the real problem with outsourcing, if you don't think it through, is that it can wreck your business and cost you a bundle. Case in point: Boeing Co. and its 787 Dreamliner. The next-generation airliner is billions of dollars over budget and about three years late; the first paying passengers won't be boarding until this fall, if then.
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NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
Talk about flying in the face of convention. Whereas many planes use a white or light color scheme, a newly painted Air New Zealand 787-9 is a study in black--a stunning study at that. The Dreamliner, whose paint job was completed Saturday at Seattle's Boeing facility, will be part of Air New Zealand 's group of 10 such aircraft but is so far the only one with the black scheme. Starting Oct. 15, the craft will carry passengers on a route from Auckland, New Zealand, to Perth, Australia, and also will fly from Auckland to Shanghai and from Auckland to Tokyo.  It's adorned with the fern, a New Zealand symbol that has its roots in Maori culture.
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BUSINESS
January 13, 2011
Cruising speed: 567 mph, 37 mph faster than the Boeing 767 Top speed: 593 mph Price: About $200 million Seating: 210 to 290 passengers Dimensions: 8 feet, 2 inches high and 17 feet, 3 inches wide, 15 inches higher than the 767 and 2.5 feet wider Cabin features: More legroom, bigger overhead luggage bins Windows: Three inches larger, with buttons to dim outside light, replacing window shades ...
BUSINESS
March 7, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
Boeing Co. has notified airlines that a change in a supplier's manufacturing process may have resulted in hairline cracks on the wings of about 40 of its yet-to-be-delivered 787 Dreamliners. Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. told Boeing there was a problem related to fasteners on the 787's carbon fiber composite wing. Boeing, which has delivered 123 of the planes, said the problem may be present in a limited number of airplanes still in production, but none of its in-service fleet is involved.
OPINION
January 19, 2013
Re "FAA grounds entire fleet of Boeing 787s," Jan. 17 Although the recent incidents with Boeing's 787 are concerning, this is not the end of the Dreamliner. Mandatory groundings and airworthiness directives from the Federal Aviation Administration have been issued on many aircraft that have gone on to have successful flying careers. Consider the required modifications to the wings of the McDonnell Douglas DC-10, rudder problems on the Boeing 737 in the mid-1990s and, most recently, wing cracks on the Airbus A380.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
This has been a bad couple of months for Boeing Co.'s 787 Dreamliner, but not for the company's stock price. Despite the January grounding of the Dreamliner by the Federal Aviation Administration, investors drove up shares of the aircraft maker to territory it had not seen since 2008. Boeing stock is up about 14% this year. FULL COVERAGE: Boeing's troubled Dreamliner The upswing has been fueled by confidence that the Dreamliner will soon be cleared to resume passenger flights, a move that would allow Boeing to deliver 787s to carriers worldwide.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
For the first time, Japanese airline All Nippon Airways took to the skies carrying paying passengers aboard the world's first Boeing 787 Dreamliner. The much-anticipated passenger flight Wednesday was a charter trip from Narita, near Tokyo, to Hong Kong that took about four hours. The 787 Dreamliner is an all-new commercial jetliner that Boeing Co. says is the most advanced, fuel-stingy passenger jet ever made. It features a suite of new technologies, such as the largest windows on a commercial jetliner and the extensive use of strong, lightweight carbon composites rather than sheets of aluminum.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Chris Erskine
Dreamliners began their third week on the ground Thursday as investigators continued to study lithium-battery systems that burned on two 787s. The Wall Street Journal reports that investigators have not found any problems with the design, manufacture or installation of the batteries or with circuitry that is supposed to forestall danger of fire. Boeing is continuing to build 787s, but will not deliver them until the investigation is over. . . . . The lowest international winter fares are up only 2% compared with a year ago, TransAtlanticReport.com says.  But low fares for April and May are up at least 6% . . . . John Wayne Airport says passenger traffic in 2012 increased 2.9% compared with 2011.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2010 | From Reuters
Boeing Co's new 787 Dreamliner touched down in Britain on Sunday on its first trip outside the United States, thrilling hordes of eager planespotters who came out to see the breakthrough carbon-composite plane. A media circus ensued as Boeing executives, including CEO Jim McNerney, emerged smiling from the plane, though McNerney did not actually fly to England with the plane, instead getting on board after landing. Social media was active with blow-by-blow coverage of the arrival, pointing to the intense interest in the plane not only within the business but also in the flight-enthusiast community.
WORLD
January 17, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- European air-safety officials followed their American counterparts' lead Thursday by grounding Boeing 787 Dreamliner jumbo jets after a series of worrisome incidents aboard the new aircraft. The European Aviation Safety Agency, or EASA, announced that it was adopting the Federal Aviation Administration's directive, issued Wednesday, ordering all 787s taken out of service. Jeremie Teahan, a spokesman for the EASA, said the action was taken "to ensure the continuing airworthiness of the European fleet.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Newly signed Yankees pitcher Masahiro Tanaka might have saved a few bucks if he had signed with the L.A. Dodgers instead of the New York team. The 25-year-old reportedly paid a cool $200,000 to rent a 787 Dreamliner to fly from Tokyo to New York City - with less than a handful of passengers and his toy poodle - to be on time for spring training, according to media reports. Reports say he rented the Japan Airlines plane that landed at JFK Airport on Sunday, its 200 or so seats pretty much empty.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Aerospace giant Boeing Co. posted a larger-than-expected 13% jump in second-quarter profit that was driven by higher deliveries of passenger jets. But in a conference call with analysts, Boeing Chief Executive James McNerney warned that federal money held back under sequestration budget cuts could have consequences in the future on its defense, space and security business unit, which is spread throughout Southern California. "We've seen some impact of sequestration, but we have not begun to see most of it yet," McNerney said.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
The Federal Aviation Administration is developing a plan requiring airlines to inspect the emergency devices on their Boeing 787 Dreamliners after a fire erupted on the plane last week while it was parked at London's Heathrow Airport. On Friday the agency said these mandatory inspections “would ask operators to inspect for proper wire routing and any signs of wire damage or pinching, as well as inspect the battery compartment for unusual signs of heating or moisture.” The FAA plan is not expected to ground the worldwide 787 fleet, as happened earlier this year.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
British accident investigators determined that an emergency device was probably responsible for the fire that broke out last week on an empty Boeing Co. 787 Dreamliner parked at London's Heathrow Airport and advised airlines to disable it on all planes. In addition, Britain's Air Accidents Investigation Branch issued a “special bulletin” Thursday urging U.S. regulators to conduct an extensive safety review. The Federal Aviation Administration will now have to decide what to do about the device, which is installed on the worldwide problem-plagued 787 fleet and thousands of other commercial airplanes.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
A Boeing Co. 787 Dreamliner operated by Japan Airlines had to return to Boston's Logan International Airport after an indicator light came on in the cockpit. Japan Airlines Co. Flight 7 was bound for Tokyo, but instead made a U-turn over Canada and landed in Boston. “As a standard precautionary measure due to a maintenance message -- fuel pump indicator -- JL007 bound for Tokyo-Narita is returning to Boston Logan for check,” airline spokeswoman Carol Anderson said. FULL COVERAGE: Boeing's troubled Dreamliner The Federal Aviation Administration said the 787 circled in the vicinity of the airport to burn off fuel before landing.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
One of Boeing Co.'s major suppliers for its 787 Dreamliner passenger jet will help determine if its emergency device played any part in a fire that broke out last week on an empty aircraft parked at London's Heathrow Airport. Honeywell International Inc., maker of the plane's emergency locater transmitter, joined Britain's Air Accidents Investigation Branch in the probe, along with the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, the Federal Aviation Administration and Boeing. The transmitter, installed on commercial airplanes, emits signals to emergency crews in crisis situations.
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Times staff
Days after a fire was found on a new Boeing 787 Dreamliner when it landed in Boston, U.S. regulators announced plans today for a sweeping review of the plane's design and assembly processes. The next-generation Dreamliner has been plagued with problems during its conception and rolled out years behind schedule. "We are confident about the safety of this aircraft," said Michael Huerta, head of the Federal Aviation Administration. "But we're concerned about these incidents and will conduct a review until we are completely satisfied.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
After three weeks of being grounded due to safety concerns, the Federal Aviation Administration has allowed Boeing Co. to begin limited flight test activities with its 787 Dreamliner passenger jet. The principal purpose of the upcoming test flights will be to collect data about the plane's lithium-ion battery and electrical systems while the aircraft is airborne, the FAA said . The 787 has been grounded since Jan. 16 by the FAA because of...
BUSINESS
July 15, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
A key supplier on Boeing Co.'s 787 Dreamliner passenger jet has confirmed it has joined the ongoing investigation into a fire that broke out last week on an Ethiopian Airlines aircraft parked at London's Heathrow Airport. Honeywell International Inc. makes the plane's emergency locater transmitter, which is a device installed on all commercial airplanes. Known as an ELT, it transmits signals in an emergency. So if a plane is involved in a crash, the transmitter will alert search parties to its location.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Wall Street seems unfazed by the latest incident to hit Boeing Co.'s 787 Dreamliner. The company's stock has been trading up all day. Boeing's shares were trading up $3.57, or 3.5%  to $105.44, recovering much of its loss of nearly 5%, or $5.01, on Friday. That same day, a 787 that had been sitting at a remote parking stand for more than eight hours at London's Heathrow Airport caught fire. No one was onboard the Ethiopian Airlines plane and no one was injured, the airline and an airport spokeswoman said.
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