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Dress Code

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OPINION
September 8, 2013
Re "Dressing down school dress codes," Opinion, Sept. 5 Law professor Ruthann Robson opines that a dress code focusing on "the number of inches between the hem of a skirt and top of a knee" tends to "divert attention from substantive learning. " Having raised five sons through adolescence, I submit an immutable correlation: The higher the hemlines of female high school students' skirts, the less attention nearby males pay to their studies. On-the-ground school administrators seem better positioned than ivory-tower judges to make sensible decisions about students' attire.
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SPORTS
March 6, 2014 | By Eric Pincus
On Thursday, the NBA sent out a memo to the Lakers, urging players to adhere to the league's dress code, especially when they arrive at arenas on game days. The mandatory dress code, implemented in 2005, requires players to wear at least a jacket while shunning jeans, hats, T-shirts and the like. One player who stuck with the dress code Thursday night before the Lakers hosted the Clippers was Nick Young, in typically stylish manner. Young, who goes by the nickname "Swaggy P," wore a bright blue suit to Staples Center with sparkling white shoes and no socks.
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OPINION
March 20, 1988
It is interesting that Disneyland management says that it bans mustaches, beards and long hair for male employees ("A Change of Codes at Disney Hotel," Part I, March 8) because visitors expect the staff to be "wholesome and well-scrubbed." Walt Disney himself sported a mustache! Might we infer then that Disneyland management does not consider Walt Disney to have been a "wholesome and well-scrubbed" person? STEVE MITTMAN San Pedro
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
A high school student who grabbed a National Rifle Assn. T-shirt in her hurry to find something to wear to school was later confronted outside class by campus officials who forced the student to remove her shirt or face possible disciplinary action, the girl's parents said. Haley Bullwinkle heeded the demand, took off the white T-shirt and slipped on a school shirt that officials at Canyon High in Anaheim handed her, but came home confused and frightened, said her father, who got the shirt when he joined the NRA. "I felt like they were violating my rights, my freedom of speech," the sophomore said.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
If you cringe at the thought of flying on a commercial flight, you are not alone. You probably have lots of complaints about the long lines, intrusive security searches and fees for food, drinks and even pillows. But airline workers also have gripes, mostly about their tough working conditions and how they are treated by frustrated passengers. In a recent survey of 700 airline workers in 85 countries, fliers who snapped their fingers to get the attention of flight attendants were ranked as the biggest annoyance.
NEWS
July 31, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
Colleagues at our downtown neighbor, the legal newspaper the Daily Journal, were just put on notice to spiff if up. A memo more detailed than a “Project Runway” challenge laid out an employee dress code in dos and don'ts -- mostly don'ts, by far, and most of them directed at women's styles. I can't imagine that any journalist at the Daily Journal ever pranced into the office in a bare midriff, so the reasons for such specifics elude me. The memo was as detailed as a FIDM class on the differences between capris, which are not acceptable, and crop or ankle pants, which are. Spaghetti-strap tops can be worn only with a sweater or jacket.
SPORTS
March 6, 2014 | By Eric Pincus
On Thursday, the NBA sent out a memo to the Lakers, urging players to adhere to the league's dress code, especially when they arrive at arenas on game days. The mandatory dress code, implemented in 2005, requires players to wear at least a jacket while shunning jeans, hats, T-shirts and the like. One player who stuck with the dress code Thursday night before the Lakers hosted the Clippers was Nick Young, in typically stylish manner. Young, who goes by the nickname "Swaggy P," wore a bright blue suit to Staples Center with sparkling white shoes and no socks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1990
It appears to me that Los Angeles is dressing its cabbies for parochial school instead of work. No plaid trousers, c'mon! VIC BURNETT San Diego
OPINION
September 8, 2013
Re "Dressing down school dress codes," Opinion, Sept. 5 Law professor Ruthann Robson opines that a dress code focusing on "the number of inches between the hem of a skirt and top of a knee" tends to "divert attention from substantive learning. " Having raised five sons through adolescence, I submit an immutable correlation: The higher the hemlines of female high school students' skirts, the less attention nearby males pay to their studies. On-the-ground school administrators seem better positioned than ivory-tower judges to make sensible decisions about students' attire.
OPINION
September 5, 2013 | By Ruthann Robson
Hey kids, what are you going to wear to school today? A miniskirt? How short? "Sagging" pants: Is that kosher? What about a do-rag? Fishnet tights? Or hoodies, tattoos, sweat pants, frayed jeans, an Afro puff or, if you're a boy, long locks? How about a breast-cancer-awareness bracelet featuring the word "boobies"? All of these are real examples of fashion choices that schools across the country have recently attempted to restrict. The wrong choice could get you kicked out of class or suspended; and if you want to fight for your right to a hoodie or a short skirt, you and your parents may have to file suit and head for court.
NEWS
July 31, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
Colleagues at our downtown neighbor, the legal newspaper the Daily Journal, were just put on notice to spiff if up. A memo more detailed than a “Project Runway” challenge laid out an employee dress code in dos and don'ts -- mostly don'ts, by far, and most of them directed at women's styles. I can't imagine that any journalist at the Daily Journal ever pranced into the office in a bare midriff, so the reasons for such specifics elude me. The memo was as detailed as a FIDM class on the differences between capris, which are not acceptable, and crop or ankle pants, which are. Spaghetti-strap tops can be worn only with a sweater or jacket.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
While the former Kate Middleton prepares for her new baby, another young royal is stepping into the spotlight: Princess Beatrice. Yes, she of deer-antler royal wedding hat fame. The 24-year-old royal is the daughter of Queen Elizabeth's second son, Prince Andrew, and Fergie, the former Duchess of York. That makes her Prince William's first cousin, for those needing things in Kate-William terms, and fifth in line for the British throne. Until the royal baby arrives, that is. The princess arrived to the Royal Ascot races in Berkshire, west of London, in a horse-drawn carriage Thursday with her aunt, Princess Anne.
NEWS
June 20, 2013
Queen Elizabeth II surprised the crowds at Thursday's meeting of the Royal Ascot races by wearing lilac, unknowingly defying the bookies who had laid 3-1 odds that blue would be her hue of the day. But she was in for a surprise of sorts, too -- she became the first reigning British monarch to win the Gold Cup race when her horse Estimate crossed the finish line. PHOTOS: Ladies' Day at the Royal Ascot Races Meanwhile, fashion police -- otherwise known as "style assistants" -- were cracking down this year during the annual five-day meet.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2013 | By Tina Susman
The straps have it. A New Jersey school board has ruled that eighth-grade girls attending a dance next month must wear dresses with straps -- or at least one strap -- ending a debate that raised allegations of sexism, led to a school principal being threatened, and forced the cancellation of another dance.  The decision Wednesday night in Readington Township, about 60 miles west of New York City, was not without drama. The township's school board heard more than an hour of testimony from parents and would-be fashion police, and it cast three votes before reaching a decision, according to the New Jersey Star-Ledger.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Five years ago I wrote an op-ed column for The Times about Pope Benedict XVI's partiality for ornate vestments and miters (the double-pointed hats sported not only by the pope but also by other bishops in the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches). That article, which a clever copy editor titled “Dress Code,”  is looking more and more like a period piece after the inaugural Mass of Benedict's successor, Pope Francis. In what must have been a disappointment to Msgr Guido Marini, the papal “master of ceremonies” who outfitted Benedict in skyscraper jeweled miters and elaborately embroidered chasubles, Francis dressed down at a ceremony that was a far cry from the formality of Benedict's inaugural Mass, let alone the coronations with which popes began their pontificate before Pope John Paul I junked the tiara in 1978.
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