Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDrinking Age
IN THE NEWS

Drinking Age

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
May 30, 2011 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's no secret that people drink alcohol before they turn 21. Stories about binge drinking on college campuses and alcohol-fueled high school parties are as easy to find as the Facebook photos that document them. But underage drinking isn't all fun and games. Kids who don't know their limits can drink to the point of alcohol poisoning, and those who feel invincible — as many at that age do — may underestimate the danger of getting behind the wheel. Some experts say the solution is to lower the legal drinking age to 18. More than 130 college chancellors and presidents have signed a petition initiated in 2008 in support of the idea.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 7, 2012 | By David Colker
Underage drinkers who participated in a study to see if they could buy alcoholic beverages online were successful in 45% of attempts. The study, conducted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, recruited eight people, ages 18 to 20, to try to purchase wine, beer and other beverages online, according to Bloomberg News. To keep participants on the right side of the law in case they got caught, each got a letter of immunity from the local district attorney. The participants were instructed, for the purposes of the study, to lie about their age when filling out order forms.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 7, 2012 | By David Colker
Underage drinkers who participated in a study to see if they could buy alcoholic beverages online were successful in 45% of attempts. The study, conducted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, recruited eight people, ages 18 to 20, to try to purchase wine, beer and other beverages online, according to Bloomberg News. To keep participants on the right side of the law in case they got caught, each got a letter of immunity from the local district attorney. The participants were instructed, for the purposes of the study, to lie about their age when filling out order forms.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Under-21 drinking, which was legal in the U.S. decades ago, could have some lasting consequences. A study finds that drinking-age women who lived in states that allowed people under 21 to drink could be at higher risk for suicide and homicide later in life. Data from national cause-of-death files plus census surveys were examined for the study, released online today in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research . Reports contained information on more than 200,000 suicides and 130,000 homicides for people who turned 18 between 1967 and 1989.
NEWS
February 6, 1986 | United Press International
The Legislature on Wednesday approved and sent to the governor a measure that would end Vermont's status as one of only three states to allow 18-year-olds to drink. The House voted 77 to 69 for final approval of the bill, which would raise the minimum drinking age from 18 to 21 on July 1. Gov. Madeleine M. Kunin said she plans to sign the measure today.
NEWS
March 12, 1988 | Associated Press
Wyoming on Friday became the last state to raise its drinking age to 21 when Gov. Mike Sullivan signed into law a bill raising the age from 19, effective July 1. "When this becomes effective, we will no longer be an island," Sullivan said. "It is in the best interests of the state, the country and, foremost, in the best interests of the young people of this state." Wyoming stood to lose $8.2 million in federal highway funds immediately if the age increase were not in place in July.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1986 | Associated Press
The Hawaii Senate has passed and sent to Gov. George Ariyoshi a bill that would raise the legal age for drinking from 18 to 21 on Oct. 1. The vote Wednesday was 23 to 2. The drinking law would remain in effect for a five-year trial period, after which legislators and state officials would review whether the change had any substantial impact on drinking-related deaths and injuries on the highways.
NEWS
May 30, 1986 | United Press International
Wisconsin on Thursday moved a step closer to raising its minimum drinking age from 19 to 21. The state Senate voted 19 to 14 to approve a compromise measure passed by the Assembly a day earlier. Gov. Anthony S. Earl has said that he will sign the legislation, which would be effective Sept. 1.
NEWS
December 1, 1986 | Associated Press
The Supreme Court today agreed to decide whether some federal highway money may be withheld from states that fail to adopt a minimum drinking age of 21. The justices said they will hear arguments by South Dakota authorities that such a federal law unconstitutionally weakens state powers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1985 | TOM GREELEY, Times Staff Writer
Because the military brass would rather have servicemen under 21 years old drink on base rather than in Mexico, San Diego County Marine and Navy posts have been exempted from a Pentagon order directing that on-base drinking rules conform to state laws. The order, designed to reduce the number of drinking-related fatalities among military personnel, goes into effect June 1.
HEALTH
May 30, 2011 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's no secret that people drink alcohol before they turn 21. Stories about binge drinking on college campuses and alcohol-fueled high school parties are as easy to find as the Facebook photos that document them. But underage drinking isn't all fun and games. Kids who don't know their limits can drink to the point of alcohol poisoning, and those who feel invincible — as many at that age do — may underestimate the danger of getting behind the wheel. Some experts say the solution is to lower the legal drinking age to 18. More than 130 college chancellors and presidents have signed a petition initiated in 2008 in support of the idea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2008 | SANDY BANKS
The guys from Sigma Nu were one pitcher of beer into a game of "baseball" when I took a seat at their table in USC's on-campus bar and asked for an interview. I wanted to know how they felt about the suggestion by a group of college presidents that the legal drinking age be lowered to 18. They wanted to finish their drinking game. It involved flipping quarters into cups of beer representing base hits and downing the drink the coin landed in. So we talked while they drank.
HEALTH
September 1, 2008 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Gordie BAILEY JR. had been in college only one month before he overdosed on alcohol. Urged on by members of a frat house he was intent on joining, the 18-year-old drank until he passed out, was dumped onto a couch and was found dead the next morning. The 2004 incident at the University of Colorado was one of the approximately 1,700 alcohol-related deaths that occur among college students each year in the United States. They include traffic accidents, falls, suffocation, drowning and alcohol poisoning.
SPORTS
August 27, 2008 | Kurt Streeter
NEW YORK -- Sam Querrey had just walloped his way to one of the biggest wins of his tennis career but now, a bit later, he couldn't find his coach or his parents. "I don't know where they are," the lanky 20-year-old said, grinning. "I want to call them, but, to be honest, I just dropped my cellphone in the toilet." The wry grin didn't leave his face, even when he couldn't find an open chair in the players lounge. "Looks like we're going to sit on the floor," he said, pointing to a patch of carpet.
NEWS
August 27, 2008 | Robert Nash Parker, Robert Nash Parker is a professor of sociology and co-director of the Presley Center for Crime and Justice Studies at UC Riverside.
A well-intentioned but misguided group of college and university presidents has been in the news recently for suggesting that we revisit the drinking age and asserting that 21 "is not working." Called the Amethyst Initiative, their proposal would have received a failing grade in my sociology classroom for its faulty logic and how unmindful it is of the history of alcohol policy in this country. During the 1960s and 1970s, most states lowered the drinking age from 21 to 18 or 19. Arguments about the draft were cited -- "old enough to fight, but not to drink" -- and in the general liberal climate of those times, good policy gave way to popular sentiment.
OPINION
August 21, 2008
Moving with an alacrity not often seen in academia, the presidents of more than 100 U.S. colleges and universities have signed a newly circulated manifesto calling for the country to "rethink the drinking age." They weren't standing up for the maturity of their underclassmen, however; if anything, they were signaling their frustration at their students' lack of maturity. Binge drinking is a growing problem among underage students, and these administrators believe that it's time to change the United States' approach to regulating teenage drinking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2001 | Interviews conducted by Samantha MacLaren
TINA PASCO Executive director, Los Angeles County MADD I am not in favor of lowering the drinking age because it has been proved time and time again that the highest alcohol-related death rates affect those who are between 15 and 24 years old. These are death rates for young adults who were drinking and driving. These young adults are still learning driving skills and decision-making skills. And when you mix in mind-altering drugs such as alcohol, it further impairs those skills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2008 | Larry Gordon and Gale Holland, Times Staff Writers
As college students gear up for annual back-to-school parties, a group of university and college presidents in California and across the country this week pushed for a national debate over whether the drinking age should be lowered from 21 to 18. The current limit ignores the reality of drinking during college years and drives it underground, making binge drinking more dangerous and students less likely to seek help in an emergency, according to...
SPORTS
February 8, 2004 | Ben Bolch, Times Staff Writer
On the eve of the NHL All-Star game, Graham Hays of espn.com compiled a list of 10 ways to make hockey more exciting. Suggestion No. 2 was serving more Canadian beer. "If you want people of legal drinking age to show up for a game between Nashville and Phoenix when it's warm enough outside for the golf course to be taking reservations, you can't serve them beer that tastes like it skipped a few steps on that journey from the mountain spring," Hays wrote.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|