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BUSINESS
February 9, 2009 | Meg James
This time, the women rode to Hollywood's rescue. Film executives, who typically cast men as the heroes, were breathing easier after six movies each generated more than $10 million in ticket sales this weekend, fueling a dramatic 35% increase in total receipts over the same week a year ago. Such films as "He's Just Not That Into You," which was particularly popular among women, beat expectations and suggested that the recession and rising unemployment rate have not yet damped movie attendance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As the night grew darker, a cold wind whipped across the asphalt expanse of the vintage Rubidoux Drive-In Theatre in Riverside. A howling gust banged open the door to the snack bar, where hot dogs glistened on metal spits and the black-and-white linoleum floor gleamed. Quentin Tarantino's "Django Unchained" flickered to life on the colossal screen - for an audience of eight cars. This time of year is always slow at drive-in theaters, which have been struggling with declining attendance for decades.
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NEWS
February 4, 1990 | Reuters
Salman Rushdie, in hiding for nearly a year since the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini of Iran ordered his death, said in an interview published Saturday that he misses ordinary pleasures like driving a car and going to the movies. In a 90-minute telephone interview with Newsweek, Rushdie also said he feels that if his novel "The Satanic Verses" is not issued in paperback, then the death order and the campaign against the book will have succeeded.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2009 | Meg James
This time, the women rode to Hollywood's rescue. Film executives, who typically cast men as the heroes, were breathing easier after six movies each generated more than $10 million in ticket sales this weekend, fueling a dramatic 35% increase in total receipts over the same week a year ago. Such films as "He's Just Not That Into You," which was particularly popular among women, beat expectations and suggested that the recession and rising unemployment rate have not yet damped movie attendance.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1989 | JESUS SANCHEZ
You would think that a car-crazy Californian would have created the drive-in movie theater. But the distinction goes to a New Jersey chemical company owner. Richard Hollingshead opened the world's first drive-in in Camden, N.J., on June 6, 1933. Hollingshead, who died in 1975, came upon the idea when he set up a screen on his driveway and a home projector on the top of a car so that his family could enjoy a movie outdoors.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As the night grew darker, a cold wind whipped across the asphalt expanse of the vintage Rubidoux Drive-In Theatre in Riverside. A howling gust banged open the door to the snack bar, where hot dogs glistened on metal spits and the black-and-white linoleum floor gleamed. Quentin Tarantino's "Django Unchained" flickered to life on the colossal screen - for an audience of eight cars. This time of year is always slow at drive-in theaters, which have been struggling with declining attendance for decades.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Movie ticket sales rose 8% to a record of about $7.3 billion in the U.S. and Canada last year, driven partly by higher prices and a record number of blockbuster films, according to AC Nielsen figures. Walt Disney Co. led the pack of major studios with a market share of 17%, or $1.24 billion, followed by Time Warner Inc.'s Warner Bros. with 14.3%, or $1.04 billion. The number of tickets sold rose 4% to 1.49 billion, while the average ticket price increased by about 4% to $4.89.
AUTOS
June 21, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
NO modern movie about Los Angeles is complete without an establishing shot of freeway signs. It's the single image that has come to represent us on film, whether we like it or not. No matter what sights are contained within this sprawling, diverse city, it is universally recognized for the thoroughfares that snake around it. Movies set in New York open on sunset views of Central Park or a gilt skyline at sunrise, not the Holland Tunnel at rush hour. But L.A.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1998 | SCOTT CHARTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Christopher Jackson knew something was up when his dad transplanted the white leather seats from their idled 1965 Mustang to the bed of the family pickup truck. "I asked him why. He said we were going to the drive-in movies," the 12-year-old recalled. "I started jumping up and down, I was so excited." And with that, Christopher became one of the legions of people who are discovering--or rediscovering--drive-in movies. "It's cool," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1996 | Robin Rauzi
It's August, in the Valley. Friends on the other side of the hill are making it clear that they feel sorry for us. OK, it's HOT. We'll give you that. But living in Encino and elsewhere in the Valley is just fine, thank you. Save your pity for people who don't have a smorgasbord of entertainment options. And we're talking about things you can do practically free on a weekend other than float motionless in your pool.
AUTOS
June 21, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
NO modern movie about Los Angeles is complete without an establishing shot of freeway signs. It's the single image that has come to represent us on film, whether we like it or not. No matter what sights are contained within this sprawling, diverse city, it is universally recognized for the thoroughfares that snake around it. Movies set in New York open on sunset views of Central Park or a gilt skyline at sunrise, not the Holland Tunnel at rush hour. But L.A.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Movie ticket sales rose 8% to a record of about $7.3 billion in the U.S. and Canada last year, driven partly by higher prices and a record number of blockbuster films, according to AC Nielsen figures. Walt Disney Co. led the pack of major studios with a market share of 17%, or $1.24 billion, followed by Time Warner Inc.'s Warner Bros. with 14.3%, or $1.04 billion. The number of tickets sold rose 4% to 1.49 billion, while the average ticket price increased by about 4% to $4.89.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1998 | SCOTT CHARTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Christopher Jackson knew something was up when his dad transplanted the white leather seats from their idled 1965 Mustang to the bed of the family pickup truck. "I asked him why. He said we were going to the drive-in movies," the 12-year-old recalled. "I started jumping up and down, I was so excited." And with that, Christopher became one of the legions of people who are discovering--or rediscovering--drive-in movies. "It's cool," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1996 | Robin Rauzi
It's August, in the Valley. Friends on the other side of the hill are making it clear that they feel sorry for us. OK, it's HOT. We'll give you that. But living in Encino and elsewhere in the Valley is just fine, thank you. Save your pity for people who don't have a smorgasbord of entertainment options. And we're talking about things you can do practically free on a weekend other than float motionless in your pool.
NEWS
February 4, 1990 | Reuters
Salman Rushdie, in hiding for nearly a year since the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini of Iran ordered his death, said in an interview published Saturday that he misses ordinary pleasures like driving a car and going to the movies. In a 90-minute telephone interview with Newsweek, Rushdie also said he feels that if his novel "The Satanic Verses" is not issued in paperback, then the death order and the campaign against the book will have succeeded.
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