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Driver Training

NEWS
September 8, 1992 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For California teen-agers, a driver's license has long symbolized maturity and provided a passport to freedom in the land of freeways and endless suburbs. But growing numbers of 16- to 19-year-olds are now forgoing--or at least delaying--this rite of passage. Even though the size of California's teen-age population has remained virtually unchanged over the last decade, the number of licensed teen-agers has dropped by 18.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1992 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laidlaw Transit, which provides bus transportation to about 400 Ventura County students on a daily basis, agreed Friday to pay $25,000 in civil penalties to settle a lawsuit filed against the company for unlawful practices related to its driver training program. The settlement with the county did not include any admission of wrongdoing by Laidlaw, the nation's largest provider of school bus transportation, authorities said.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | NATE BARKSDALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I'm not normally a procrastinating person, especially when it comes to important steps in my life, yet, for some reason known only to God, I put off learning to drive for an astoundingly long time.
MAGAZINE
February 9, 1992
Now let me get this straight: The principal at Grant High School had his budget for basics such as books and paper cut by $25,000, an English teacher cannot find enough books for her students to read, science teachers get only $40 a year to replace critical supplies such as test tubes and chemicals, and yet the school board hires teachers (at an average annual salary of $43,000) to teach sewing, chorus, driver training, music, gym, agriculture and drama? FRANK WAGNER Playa del Rey
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1991 | TERRY SPENCER
A 28-year-old Costa Mesa truck driver narrowly escaped a potentially fatal accident Monday when he scampered from his vehicle moments before it was demolished by a train. Glenn Jennings, a driver for Stonegate Roofing of Anaheim, was returning to the company's facility at 9:50 a.m. when his truck stalled on the Santa Fe Railway tracks at Orangethorpe Avenue and Jefferson Street as a 54-car train weighing 4,425 tons bore down at 55 m.p.h., police said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1991
The Long Beach Police Department, which last year had more car accidents than it has cars, is considering a driver awareness program for officers to curtail collisions that cost the city $147,000 in damages, according to a department memo. The agency, which has 101 black and white cruisers, recorded 155 accidents during the 1990-91 fiscal year. Only three cars in the fleet were not involved in a crash, according to a Nov.
NEWS
September 26, 1991
The Glendale Board of Education voted last week not to offer driver training for the second year in a row due to a shortage in state funding. Equipment used for driver simulation will be offered for sale to potential buyers in California, Nevada and Arizona. Eight driver training cars will be set aside for district employees who car pool. The district will continue to offer driver education in the classroom as part of a traffic, health and guidance course.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1991
The Los Angeles Unified School District will begin offering a limited driver training program for 12,000 students this year, using state funds to restore classes that had been cut. The district had canceled its driver training classes and laid off 33 driving teachers because the state stopped funding the program. But by using a $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1991 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
The Simi Valley school board decided Tuesday to retain a driver's training class and to offer a rebate to students who attended school diligently. Of the 595 Simi Valley Unified School District students who took the driver's training class this spring, 90 were eligible to receive a partial rebate of the $130 class fee. A $39 refund was offered to students who were absent no more than five days from any class during the semester.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1991 | SANDY BANKS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Heeding an administrative law judge's recommendation, and advice from its own lawyers, the Los Angeles school board voted 6 to 0 Thursday to rescind all but a handful of the layoff notices sent in March to teachers, librarians, nurses, psychologists and others. However, the district may still lay off as many as 2,000 probationary teachers, those with less than three years of experience, to help balance its 1991-92 budget.
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