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April 2, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
We already knew that Dropbox had an all-star lineup of investors. Now the hot San Francisco startup revealed in a tweet two more: Bono and the Edge , the singer and lead guitarist of the rock band U2. The pair apparently took part in Dropbox's $250 million funding round last year that valued the company at $4 billion. This was the first time that Bono was identified as an individual investor in a tech company, but he's no novice tech investor. He's a co-founder and managing partner in Elevation Partners, which has sunk money into Facebook and Yelp and is raising a new $1 billion fund.
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BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
The week seemed to start off on a triumphant note for hot Silicon Valley start-up Dropbox. The company held a media event Wednesday to unveil a slew of new applications designed to demonstrate its expanding vision as it marches closer to an anticipated initial public offering. But the week is ending in controversy over this announcement: Dropbox added Condeelezza Rice to its board. "When looking to grow our board, we sought out a leader who could help us expand our global footprint," co-founder Drew Houston wrote on the company's blog . "Dr. Rice has had an illustrious career as provost of Stanford University, board member of companies like Hewlett-Packard and Charles Schwab, and former United States secretary of State.
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NEWS
March 28, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The long-rumored Google Drive may finally launch next month, putting the search giant toe to toe with Dropbox, the leader in the cloud storage market.  The latest rumor concerning Google Drive came from GigaOM , which claims "well placed sources" are saying the cloud storage service "might" launch in early April. Drive will offer users 1 GB of free storage and charge for additional space, according to the report. Others in the cloud storage market offer much more than 1 free GB. Dropbox offers 2 GBs, Microsoft's SkyDrive offers 25 free GBs, and Amazon Cloud Drive offers 5 free GBs. A spokesman for the company said in an email that Google does not comment on rumors or speculation.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Dropbox is unveiling new ways for people to hold onto and share their digital stuff as it tries to build on the popularity of its online storage service. With an initial public offering in the works, Chief Executive Drew Houston said his company is moving into its next chapter, which positions Dropbox as a “home” on the Internet to house documents, photos and videos across all devices and share them with friends, family and co-workers. With rising competitive pressures from technology giants Google and Microsoft and from start-up rival Box, which recently filed to go public, Dropbox is looking to give people new reasons to use Dropbox.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Facebook Inc. and Dropbox are teaming up to create a feature that will be helpful for study, work and productivity groups on the popular social network. The two tech companies announced Wednesday that Facebook users can now quickly upload files from their personal Dropbox accounts to their Facebook Groups and easily share the files with group members. The group's file will also be automatically updated each time the user edits it. Picture Gallery: Fresh Facebook Features Dropbox said the new feature will roll out starting Wednesday.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Four years ago, Drew Houston was just another super-smart hacker with ambitions of starting his own company. He'd strap on headphones to block out everything but the endorphin rush as he cranked code late into the night on a new service that instantly syncs all of your files on all of your devices. Houston, who played guitar in a '90s rock cover band at Boston bars and college parties, dubbed it "Even Flow" after one of his favorite Pearl Jam songs. On a white board in his Cambridge, Mass., apartment, he calculated that he'd need several hundred users to "not feel like an idiot" quitting his $85,000-a-year job as a software engineer.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Valuations being given to the most promising of the latest crop of Internet companies just keep going up and up as investors open their wallets ever wider. Dropbox, which has already raised hundreds of millions, plans to raise even more: $250 million more to be precise, at a nosebleed valuation of $8 billion, according to published reports. For those keeping track, that's more than double its last funding round that valued the company at $4 billion. And bear this in mind: tech financiers are willing to throw that kind of cash and that kind of valuation at the 5-year-old online storage service even though its revenue growth is slowing down.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Dropbox is already a hit with consumers. Now it's looking to corner the business market. The online storage service already has 200 million users who save more than 1 billion files in Dropbox every day, Chief Executive Drew Houston said. Now Dropbox is looking to get businesses on board with Dropbox for Business. The company unveiled the initiative at its San Francisco headquarters Wednesday. It's an ambitious gambit that puts Dropbox in direct competition with Google, Box and other tech heavyweights.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Dropbox has reportedly closed another round of funding, raising $250 million for a $10-billion valuation. The latest round of investments was led by BlackRock Inc., according to the Wall Street Journal, which cites unnamed sources for its Friday report . A spokeswoman for Dropbox declined to comment.  The San Francisco company specializes in cloud-storage software that lets users save items within a file on their computer that they can...
BUSINESS
July 10, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Dropbox, the cloud storage company, announced it is doubling the size of its Pro users accounts as well as adding a new 500 gigabyte option. The San Francisco-based start-up made the announcement on its blog  Tuesday, saying its users have been asking for more space. With Dropbox having recently added a feature that makes it easy to upload pictures , the company said it was time to accommodate its users. "As people add more stuff to Dropbox, we want to make sure they don't have to worry about space," the company said in its blog post.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Dropbox, fueled by an injection of new funding and a $10- billion valuation, is moving beyond online storage into a new wave of apps for email, photos and collaborative working. The company unveiled the new apps at a news conference Wednesday. The apps are designed to get more people to use Dropbox and then to remain more loyal to the service by creating a "home" for digital stuff on the Web. They include a new app called Carousel, which lets people privately and securely share photos and videos with friends.  Houston called the new apps "great experiences that don't just store your stuff but bring it to life.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Dropbox has reportedly closed another round of funding, raising $250 million for a $10-billion valuation. The latest round of investments was led by BlackRock Inc., according to the Wall Street Journal, which cites unnamed sources for its Friday report . A spokeswoman for Dropbox declined to comment.  The San Francisco company specializes in cloud-storage software that lets users save items within a file on their computer that they can...
BUSINESS
January 15, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Users seeking significant free cloud storage should download the new Apple iOS version of Box, which is giving away 50 GB of space in the cloud to users who are willing to try out the new app. Box on Wednesday released a redesigned version of its iPhone and iPad apps , which have been rebuilt with more intuitive user interfaces and have been made significantly faster than before. The Los Altos, Calif., company is one of the top players in the cloud storage market, though it doesn't compare to rival Dropbox, which is currently the dominant leader.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Valuations being given to the most promising of the latest crop of Internet companies just keep going up and up as investors open their wallets ever wider. Dropbox, which has already raised hundreds of millions, plans to raise even more: $250 million more to be precise, at a nosebleed valuation of $8 billion, according to published reports. For those keeping track, that's more than double its last funding round that valued the company at $4 billion. And bear this in mind: tech financiers are willing to throw that kind of cash and that kind of valuation at the 5-year-old online storage service even though its revenue growth is slowing down.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Dropbox is already a hit with consumers. Now it's looking to corner the business market. The online storage service already has 200 million users who save more than 1 billion files in Dropbox every day, Chief Executive Drew Houston said. Now Dropbox is looking to get businesses on board with Dropbox for Business. The company unveiled the initiative at its San Francisco headquarters Wednesday. It's an ambitious gambit that puts Dropbox in direct competition with Google, Box and other tech heavyweights.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Dropbox users can add one free gigabyte of cloud storage by simply connecting their accounts with Mailbox -- an email app Dropbox purchased earlier this year. Dropbox, which starts off users with 2 GB of free cloud storage, offers users a number of ways to increase their accounts' capacity, but connecting with Mailbox appears to be one of the easiest ways users can significantly increase their space. To do so, users simply download the app from Apple's App Store. Then, users connect their Gmail account and take an instructional tour of how the app works.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
PALO ALTO - Gentry Underwood's tiny start-up rolled out a mobile app last month that promised to tame the unruly email inbox, the bane of the digital age. Not surprisingly, the iPhone app became an overnight sensation as more than 1.3 million signed up just to be on the wait list. Dropbox apparently couldn't wait, and on Friday the online storage company bought Orchestra, the company that makes Mailbox. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. "We want to give Mailbox to everyone who wants it, and there are a lot of people who want it. We could raise more money and hire a bigger team but joining Dropbox gives us the opportunity to scale more quickly," said Underwood, chief executive and co-founder of the Palo Alto company.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - Dropbox can now tick off one of the major benefits of being a booming tech firm - fabulous new digs, complete with cafe, gym and music lounge. Founder and Chief Executive Drew Houston gave the city's tech-friendly mayor a tour of the company's sleek new headquarters that sports major-league views of the San Francisco Giants' ballpark and the San Francisco Bay. The tour came just a day after Google introduced its own competing cloud storage service that lets users load photos, documents, and videos and access them from Web-connected devices.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2013 | By Jon Healey
San Francisco-based BitTorrent released the beta version Wednesday of a new application for its digital distribution software: syncing files across multiple devices. The company says its Sync software will share files faster than cloud-based file synchronization programs (e.g., Dropbox or SugarSync) because it doesn't use the cloud -- it shares files directly from device to device. Oh, and yes, the file transfers are encrypted to deter them from being monitored or intercepted.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
By installing Dropbox on their personal computers, smartphones and tablets, users can sync chosen files and folders across all the devices. Pictures taken on an Android smartphone can be instantly accessed on a laptop. An Excel spreadsheet created on a laptop is available immediately on a tablet. Now, Dropbox is looking to extend that syncing to more types of files. The company unveiled new tools for software developers that would allow games, email apps and other programs to store and retrieve information from Dropbox in the same way as it interfaces with a physical hard drive.
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