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BUSINESS
March 16, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
PALO ALTO - Gentry Underwood's tiny start-up rolled out a mobile app last month that promised to tame the unruly email inbox, the bane of the digital age. Not surprisingly, the iPhone app became an overnight sensation as more than 1.3 million signed up just to be on the wait list. Dropbox apparently couldn't wait, and on Friday the online storage company bought Orchestra, the company that makes Mailbox. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. "We want to give Mailbox to everyone who wants it, and there are a lot of people who want it. We could raise more money and hire a bigger team but joining Dropbox gives us the opportunity to scale more quickly," said Underwood, chief executive and co-founder of the Palo Alto company.
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BUSINESS
March 16, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
PALO ALTO -- How frustrated are people with trying to use email on their mobile devices? The overnight success of iPhone app Mailbox suggests very. Some 1.3 million people have signed up just to wait in line to get it. Some 750,000 people are managing their Gmail with it right now. One company won't have to wait for Mailbox. On Friday online storage company Dropbox bought Mailbox for a reported $100 million . "Dropbox and Mailbox share the same focus: Making things we do every day easier," Mailbox Chief Executive and co-founder Gentry Underwood said.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
In what may be an industry first, a cloud services firm is offering unlimited storage for less than $5 a month. Cloud Engines, a San Francisco-based company, has begun offering a new plan through its Pogoplug cloud service that lets users store unlimited files, and any type, on the company's servers for $4.95 a month. The new Pogoplug plan went live last week and lets users save files to the cloud that they can then access from any device. Cloud Engines CEO Dan Putterman said there is no limit to the devices on which you can access or save files.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Facebook Inc. and Dropbox are teaming up to create a feature that will be helpful for study, work and productivity groups on the popular social network. The two tech companies announced Wednesday that Facebook users can now quickly upload files from their personal Dropbox accounts to their Facebook Groups and easily share the files with group members. The group's file will also be automatically updated each time the user edits it. Picture Gallery: Fresh Facebook Features Dropbox said the new feature will roll out starting Wednesday.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2012 | By Tim Bradshaw
When history comes to assess the present era of Silicon Valley, several chapters will be dedicated to Y Combinator. A start-up investment and training program masterminded by former entrepreneur Paul Graham, Y Combinator appeared at just the right moment: in 2005, when social media were emerging, the cost of launching an Internet company was falling and investors' appetite for risk was returning. In 2000, Randall Stross, a New York Times columnist and business professor at San Jose State University, published "eBoys," an account of Benchmark Capital, one of the first signature investments firms of the dot-com boom.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Dropbox, the cloud storage company, announced it is doubling the size of its Pro users accounts as well as adding a new 500 gigabyte option. The San Francisco-based start-up made the announcement on its blog  Tuesday, saying its users have been asking for more space. With Dropbox having recently added a feature that makes it easy to upload pictures , the company said it was time to accommodate its users. "As people add more stuff to Dropbox, we want to make sure they don't have to worry about space," the company said in its blog post.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Business-focused cloud service Box is taking the company international, with a new headquarters in London. "We've seen some pretty significant traction there in the past couple of years," Box founder and Chief Executive Aaron Levie told The Times. The company plans to hire 20 employees by the end of the year and 100 employees across Europe by the end of 2013. The office, which is up and running, will first be populated with four or five Box employees from the U.S., a sort of "DNA-injection team to build out the environment, to ensure the culture remains a cohesive" part of the Box family, Levie said.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais, Los Angeles Times
With the advent of Google Drive, we talk about cloud computing as if the bits and bytes of our lives are stored somewhere up in the air, but, really, the "clouds" are very terrestrial. What's more up in the air are the laws that govern who can access your stuff and how. Originally a way for geeks to explain to the rest of us the notion of remote servers storing and serving up content, cloud computing can be defined several ways, depending on whom you ask. In some ways, even email is a form of cloud computing.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Most cloud-service privacy policies address how they deal with your personal information and data about your usage, but less clear is whether they would tell you when and if law enforcement sought access to your files residing on their servers. As the virtual reality online storage wars gear up, many consumers and privacy advocates have expressed concern about the policies that will be applied to the content that they would be moving into remote servers. All of the services include a clause expressing that they will act in accordance with legal requests for data.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
A new update to Dropbox allows users to transfer photos directly from digital camera SD cards and accumulate 3 more gigabytes of free storage online. "The latest version of the Android app . and the beta versions of our Mac and Windows desktop applications includes a new way to put all the photos and videos you take in your Dropbox called Camera Upload," according to the Dropbox Help Center. To use it in the Android app, you need to enable the feature when you first launch it. It asks whether you want to enable Dropbox over your data plan and whether you want to upload existing photos and videos.
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