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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1988
"Punishing Dropouts" (editorial, June 10) was altogether predictable, at least to this veteran of 25 years in Los Angeles schools. When State Sen. Gary K. Hart's (D-Santa Barbara)legislation in question was first reported in The Times my first thought was, "I wonder how long it'll be before The Times will oppose it editorially." It took longer than I expected. Good homes continue to be the major factor in making good schools. Discipline is defined as: "Training that develops self-control, character, or orderliness and efficiency."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
For all the dangers football poses to its players, the sport still represents hope to thousands of young men. Judd Ehrlich's persuasive but slight documentary "We Could Be King" movingly argues for the necessity of high-school athletics, especially in low-income communities, where pigskin is a key tool educators have in encouraging would-be dropouts to stay in school. After the Philadelphia school board closes 37 schools and merges Martin Luther King High with its Germantown rivals, heroic Ed Dunn oversees the union of the two football teams.
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OPINION
April 12, 2008
Re "Who's a dropout?" editorial, April 6 I have a suggestion for counting students who don't graduate from California high schools. All schools have a given number of students who enter ninth grade each year and each school also has a given number of students who graduate each year. By comparing these data over several years and for each high school, it would be easy to establish an accurate pattern of actual dropouts. One local high school has more than 900 students who enter the ninth grade each year and fewer than 400 students graduate each year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
It was a surreal scene for some, a traffic headache for others, as demonstrators set up 375 desks in neat rows Tuesday on the street in front of the headquarters of the Los Angeles Unified School District. The stunt's organizers said desks represented the roughly 375 students who dropped out of L.A. Unified schools each week during the 2011-2012 school year. According to the California Department of Education, 8,748 L.A. Unified students dropped out during that school year. It's a number organizers with the Communities for Los Angeles Student Success say they don't want district officials to gloss over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1991
More than 100 school dropouts whose alternative education program in Reseda was shut down last month can resume their studies today at a new education center just blocks from the old school. School officials announced Tuesday that students who formerly attended classes at the Fully Alive Center will be able to pick up where they left off by attending the Poseidon School on Sherman Way, just east of Reseda Boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1992
Here are the dropout rates for high school districts in Los Angeles County. Rates listed are based on the number of students who entered 10th grade but had quit by the end of 12th grade. Figures are expressed as percentages of student enrollment. CLASS CLASS CLASS %CHANGE DISTRICT OF 1986 OF 1990 OF 1991 1986 TO 1991 ABC Unified 12.4 14.8 11.8 -4.8 Alhambra City 14.6 10.7 15.5 +6.2 Antelope Valley Union 68.4 15.9 23.4 -65.8 Arcadia Unified 7.8 11.7 7.1 -9.0 Azusa Unified 53.5 4.8 14.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1990
The Los Angeles Unified School District will hold open houses for high school dropouts today at several of its adult education centers throughout the area. The centers offer classes leading to a high school diploma, as well as vocational training in areas such as auto repair, computer technology, horticulture, health services, electronics, clerical and business. The classes are free to high school dropouts and students receive job placement help.
NEWS
July 17, 1986
The Downey Unified School District Tuesday approved a $70,000 pilot program called Project Success to stem the high number of high school dropouts. The program will be staffed by two teachers, who will have classes with 15 or fewer students in English, math and science. The two classes--for incoming ninth-graders who have failed four or more classes during middle school--will be at Warren and Downey high schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1996
Los Angeles will receive $3 million in federal funds for a pilot job-training program targeting high school dropouts in Watts, U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Riech announced Thursday. "High school dropouts are considered high risk for crime and delinquency," Mayor Richard Riordan said in a written statement. "Taking action to steer them in the right direction early will increase the likelihood that young Angelenos will have a fighting chance to become successful, contributing adults."
NEWS
March 20, 1986
Supt. Tom Giugni has agreed to meet with representatives of a coalition of Latino organizations to discuss their demand that the school board initiate a comprehensive five-year plan to deal with the problem of Latino school dropouts. "The magnitude of the problem is catastrophic," Ramon Cruz told the school board at its regular meeting Monday night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
Thousands of California students in foster care are suffering from an "invisible achievement gap," with worse academic performance, a higher dropout rate and placement in more failing schools than their statewide peers, according to a study set for release Monday. The study , which provides the first detailed statewide look at foster youths and their academic challenges, was made possible by a new data-sharing agreement between the state education and social services agencies.
OPINION
September 30, 2013 | By Arne Duncan and Kamala D. Harris
Millions of desks sit empty in elementary school classrooms because of truancy each year, costing schools billions of dollars, wasting public resources and squandering one of the country's most precious resources: its young people. We tend to think of truancy as something that starts in junior high or high school, but nationwide, about 1 in 10 kindergarten and first-grade students miss a month of school each year due to absences. In California, you could fill Staples Center 13 times over with the 250,000 students who missed 18 days or more last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Fred Katz, a musician, composer and educator who helped introduce the cello to jazz, died Sept. 7 in Santa Monica from complications of kidney failure and liver cancer. He was 94. His death was confirmed by his son, Hyman Katz. A child prodigy on piano and cello, Katz studied under Pablo Casals and performed with the National Symphony in Washington. He also backed Lena Horne and Tony Bennett on piano before bridging the gap between classical training and improvisation in the vibrant L.A. jazz scene of the '50s as part of the Chico Hamilton Quintet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
More than half of the teachers and staff at Crenshaw High School, including two teachers union representatives, are being displaced by a campus reorganization process ordered by L.A. Unified Supt. John Deasy. The school board in January endorsed Deasy's plan to remake the traditional high school into three magnets and require teachers to reapply for their jobs. The move came after years of high dropout rates and low student test scores at the school. Student action clubs disseminated a survey on campus after the board's vote and presented its results at a meeting this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Taylor Mead, an underground cinema legend whose comic charm and sense of the surreal inspired Andy Warhol and other seminal figures in the alternative film world, died Wednesday in Denver. He was 88. A fixture of bohemian New York who was also a poet and artist, Mead was visiting family in Colorado when he had a stroke, said his niece, Priscilla Mead. Called "the Charlie Chaplin of the 1960s underground," Mead was an elfin figure with kewpie-doll eyes who appeared, by his count, in 130 films, starting with the 1960 art house classic "The Flower Thief.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
State officials Tuesday reported slight improvements in dropout and graduation rates and continued gains made by Latino and African American students. Overall, the state dropout rate declined by 1.5 percentage points to 13.2% for the class of 2012, when compared to the class of 2011. For Latinos, the improvement was 2.1 percentage points; for African Americans, it was 3.1%. The state graduation rate was 78.5%, up 1.4 percentage points from 2011, with larger gains among Latinos and African Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1990 | SANDY BANKS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Rosetta Woods has watched her teen-age daughter bounce from school to school--and fall further and further behind--as she tried to find a place where distractions were few and lessons came easily. At an age when many students are nearing graduation, 17-year-old Sheneva had missed so much school that she faced the prospect of attending class with children years younger--or dropping out, as so many of her neighbors in the Imperial Courts housing project in Watts had done.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1985
In response to the article (Nov. 10), "Cal State Hopes to Stem Dropout Tide," I must urge caution to the California Secondary Education Commission, the Academic Affairs Office, the Cal State Board of Trustees, and any others involved with the decision concerning the raising of admission standards to Cal State universities. I wholeheartedly agree with their proposal requiring 15 college-prep courses to be completed in high school by hopeful college freshmen. This step alone could change the statistics of college dropouts significantly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
The corner of 4th and Gless streets in East Los Angeles, once a center of prostitution and drugs, now houses a place of soaring dreams. Inside the gleaming Boyle Heights Technology Youth Center, a classroom of young people battered by hard luck or bad choices is filled with quiet, focused energy. Marcos Avila, a 19-year-old who was kicked out of high school for fighting, is learning to compare and contrast two essays. Vincent Guzman, 18, who left school after his brother was killed in a drive-by shooting, is puzzling over two-step algebraic problems.
OPINION
November 2, 2012
The teachers union objected to how much an academic intervention program for teenagers might cost. The Obama administration insisted that grant approval be tied to whether teachers are evaluated in part based on their students' test scores. Both parties refused to compromise. And as a result of stubborn officials clinging to their ideological positions, the students of the Los Angeles Unified School District are probably out of the running for a $40-million grant that could have reduced dropout rates and boosted achievement.
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