Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDrought
IN THE NEWS

Drought

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1992
An unprecedented seventh year of drought faces us (Nov. 17) and I have yet to hear any official even consider a possible correlation with the greenhouse effect. Reputable publications such as Scientific American and Natural History have had articles showing possible scenarios that look ominously similar to what we are experiencing. If indeed a buildup of atmospheric CO2 is a possible contributing factor to this drought, then our hydrologists need to be looking to politicians, not God, for relief.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown and legislative leaders unveiled a proposed $687.4-million drought-relief package Wednesday to free up water supplies and aid Californians facing financial ruin because of the state's prolonged dry spell. The proposal would provide millions of dollars to clean up drinking water, improve conservation and make irrigation systems more efficient. It would increase penalties for those who illegally divert water. The plan also contains money for emergency food and housing for those out of work because of the drought, including farmworkers, and to provide emergency drinking water to communities in need.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2010 | By Amina Khan
Some Southern California cities fine residents for watering their lawns too much during droughts. But in Orange, officials are locked in a legal battle with a couple accused of violating city ordinances for removing their lawn in an attempt to save water. The dispute began two years ago, when Quan and Angelina Ha tore out the grass in their frontyard. In drought-plagued Southern California, the couple said, the lush grass had been soaking up tens of thousands of gallons of water -- and hundreds of dollars -- each year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1990
Your editorial is very much to the point. However, as a Northern California resident for most of my life I don't believe your recommendations go far enough. Northern California has had a serious drought for three years. Everyone has sacrificed plants, trees and lawns for lack of enough water, and each household has had to pay severe penalties for any overuse of water restrictions. A trip through the areas where we all get our water is enough to make one cry--dry streams that once flowed majestically with water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1988
It doesn't take a Nostradamus to predict the upcoming consumer rip-off by the food industry. Using the present drought as a reason, breads, cereals, pastas, flours, and all other grain containing foods will increase in price far more than the higher basic grain price resulting from the drought justifies. Take wheat for example; even if its price on the Chicago exchange doubles from the early year $3 a bushel to $6, that is only a 6-cent per pound increase! I'm sure we pay more for the packaging than the contents of a 10-ounce box of cereal.
SCIENCE
June 5, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Studies of oyster shells taken from an abandoned well confirm that English colonists who settled on Jamestown Island in 1607 unknowingly picked the worst possible time for their endeavor, arriving in the midst of a drought nearly unprecedented in local history. Research on tree rings had already shown that the colonists' arrival in Virginia coincided with the beginning of the driest seven-year period in 800 years, and their written records — albeit scanty — confirmed that they encountered near-horrific privation.
OPINION
April 6, 2007
Re "By every measure, it's been dry," March 31 Reading about the concern in California and the Western states regarding the lack of rain and the low snowpack in the mountains causing serious droughts, one has to wonder why these states, with several in the enviable position of directly facing the huge Pacific Ocean, are not urgently considering building desalination plants. Some years ago, when desalination was mentioned, the immediate reply from politicians was that it was too expensive.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|