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Drought

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation Saturday to free up the state's water supplies and aid residents who face hardship because of the drought, according to a release from his office. More than $687 million will go to drought relief, money that will fund housing and food for workers directly affected by the drought and projects aimed at more efficiently capturing water, the release said. “Legislators across the aisle have now voted to help hard-pressed communities that face water shortages,” Brown said in a statement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Melanie Mason and Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- A $687.4-million emergency drought relief package is on its way to Gov. Jerry Brown's desk after easily clearing the Legislature on Thursday. Brown and legislative leaders last week unveiled the proposal , which would free up the state's water supplies and provide assistance to residents who face economic hardship due to the drought.  "Today we provide significant relief," state Senate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) said in a floor speech. "This is a lot of money and will help thousands of California families dealing with the drought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Melanie Mason and Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - A $687.4-million emergency drought relief package is on its way to Gov. Jerry Brown's desk after easily clearing the Legislature on Thursday. Brown and legislative leaders unveiled the proposal last week to free up the state's water supplies and aid residents who face hardship due to the drought. "Today we provide significant relief," state Senate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) said in a floor speech. "This is a lot of money and will help thousands of California families dealing with the drought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Hector Becerra, Ari Bloomekatz and Ruben Vives
It's poor form to complain about rain, even a whole lot of it, when you really need it. So Southern Californians will just have to grin and bear it beginning Wednesday night when the first of two major storms is forecast to move into the region. The storms are expected to deliver the most rainfall since spring 2011. They come as Southern California and most of the state struggles through a historically dry stretch. Last year was the driest calendar year in L.A.'s recorded history.
OPINION
February 25, 2014
Re "Drought in a state of denial," Feb. 23 Sure, California has had severe droughts in the past, but we haven't been here before. We have not been at 400 parts per million of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere the entire history of human existence. The damage has not fully "matured. " Yet our sweet sirens of the carbon age will croon: "We've had droughts before. " But if a 100-year drought occurs now every few decades, could we recognize it and respond accordingly? Or would we allow ourselves the false comfort of saying, "Well, gosh, we've had these droughts before"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
If a product doesn't sell, try repackaging and renaming. That's a proven strategy, whatever you're peddling. Good timing also helps. Thus, when the governor's California Water Action Plan sits on a shelf unnoticed for a while - and outside it is very dry - reshape and rewrap the contents as Emergency Drought Legislation. Bingo. There's a buying frenzy. Gov. Jerry Brown and his administration spent months, behind the scenes, crafting his Water Action Plan. On Jan. 10, he devoted significant space in his annual budget proposal to the $619-million plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
The skinny rings of ancient giant sequoias and foxtail pines hold a lesson that Californians are learning once again this winter: It can get very dry, sometimes for a single parched year, sometimes for withering decades. Drought has settled over the state like a dusty blanket, leaving much of the landscape a dreary brown. Receding reservoirs have exposed the ruins of long-forgotten towns. Some cities are rationing supplies and banning outdoor watering. Many growers are expecting no irrigation deliveries from the big government water projects that turned the state's belly into the nation's produce market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Anthony York
A proposed $687.4-million drought-relief package unveiled Wednesday was met with mixed reactions, with one state Republican leader calling it a "drop in the bucket. " The proposal, presented by Gov. Jerry Brown and legislative leaders, aims to clean up drinking water, improve conservation and make irrigation systems more efficient. It also contains money to replenish groundwater supplies, and for state and local agencies to clear brush in drought-stricken areas that pose a high fire risk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO -- Gov. Jerry Brown and Democratic leaders will unveil a $687-million proposal Wednesday afternoon aimed at helping California deal with its drought emergency. The new legislation would speed up the spending of millions of dollars aimed at improving water conservation and cleaning up drinking water supplies, while increasing penalties for illegal diversion of water supplies. Most of the money in the proposal -- about $550 million worth -- would come from existing bond money approved by voters, according to sources familiar with the proposal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO -- A proposed $687.4-million drought-relief package was unveiled Wednesday to free up water supplies and aid Californians facing financial ruin. The proposal presented by Gov. Jerry Brown and legislative leaders would provide millions of dollars to clean up drinking water, improve conservation and make irrigation systems more efficient. "We really don't know how bad the drought is going to be," Brown said to reporters at the state's emergency operations center. The plan contains money for emergency food and housing for those out of work because of the drought, including farmworkers, and to provide emergency drinking water to communities in need.
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