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ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2013 | By Robert Hilburn
Johnny Cash's life in the 1960s is mostly remembered as a time of glorious achievement - from the landmark prison albums at Folsom and San Quentin to the launch of the ABC-TV series featuring such guests as Bob Dylan and the Doors that led to his becoming a giant figure in popular culture, a symbol to millions, no less, of the best of American social values. But Cash also experienced excruciatingly dark times in the decade, fueled by drugs and guilt over the breakup of his marriage.
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NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration plans to begin regulating electronic cigarettes for the first time, banning sales to minors and requiring manufacturers to put health warnings on the nicotine-delivering devices that have become a multibillion-dollar industry, according to officials who described the agency's proposal. But the agency will stop short of steps that many public health advocates and some members of Congress have called for, including restrictions on television advertisements and flavorings, such as pumpkin spice or chocolate, that may target younger consumers, officials said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1987 | STEVE EMMONS and NANCY WRIDE, Times Staff Writers
One of the family owners of the El Ranchito restaurant chain, once indicted in Hawaii for drug smuggling but never tried, was shot and killed just after midnight Thursday as he drove through his neighborhood west of Upper Newport Bay. Orange County Sheriff's Department investigators said "several shots" were fired at Joe Luis Avila, 40, of Costa Mesa, through the window of his black 1985 Porsche Carrera convertible.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department announced a new initiative Wednesday to encourage nonviolent prisoners who have served at least 10 years to apply for what is expected to be a large-scale grant of clemency in President Obama's waning years in office. Deputy Atty. Gen. James M. Cole announced that a new pardons attorney would take over a beefed-up office to handle requests that will be actively solicited throughout the federal prison system from thousands of prisoners who meet six criteria.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1986 | DOROTHY TOWNSEND, Times Staff Writer
Beach Boys drummer Dennis Wilson was a good swimmer, the only surfer in the band, and drugs had nothing to do with his drowning death, an attorney for Wilson's widow and child told Los Angeles Superior Court jurors Thursday. The panel will decide if an insurance policy on the musician's life was valid. Shawn Love Wilson, 21, sued Transamerica Occidental Life Insurance Co.
WORLD
January 27, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
YANJI, China - After the North Korean coal mine where she worked stopped paying salaries, Park Kyung Ok tried her hand at business. Buttons and zippers, candy and dried squid, fabric, plastic tarpaulins, men's suits and cigarettes. "I sold just about everything," said Park, 44. But it wasn't until she started hawking methamphetamine in 2007, she said, that she was able to earn a living. Methamphetamine, known as orum, or "ice," is a rare commodity manufactured and sold in North Korea, where most factories sit idle, the equipment rusted or looted.
SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
From a prison cell outside California, an inmate known as "Evil" was making himself known on Ventura County's streets. Martin Madrigal, 39, was squeezing drug profits from street gangs for the prison-based Mexican Mafia, according to a grand jury indictment released Tuesday. He was so feared that rival gangs cooperated on extortion schemes, drug deals and violent crimes, according to law enforcement officials. The 35-count indictment portrays Madrigal as a powerful figure representing an efficient and merciless organization that law enforcement officials believe has been operating for decades, largely from behind bars, calling shots among street gangs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2010 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Sarah Ardalani, Los Angeles Times
A 15-year-old girl died Tuesday of a suspected drug overdose after attending a rave over the weekend at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum that had a minimum age requirement of 16. The girl, identified by family members as Sasha Rodriguez, was one of two rave attendees who were in critical condition at California Hospital Medical Center after the 14th annual Electric Daisy Carnival. As Sasha's family decided whether to remove her from life support Tuesday, her mother, Grace Rodriguez, told the CBS Evening News: "I was supposed to be planning her Sweet Sixteen party.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- The Senate sent to the governor a bill sponsored by California biotech companies that would require pharmacists to notify doctors when patients are given a so-called biosimilar drug. Such medicines are used as lower-cost substitutes for biological drugs made from human blood, serums, bacterial cultures, viruses and other microorganisms. Although not identical, the biosimilars are designed to produce similar effects on human health. The bill passed on a 30-2 tally late Wednesday.
SCIENCE
April 23, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Two drugs given to people who suffer migraines reduced the frequency of their headaches in early trials, scientists said. The test results “may potentially represent a new era in preventive therapy for migraine,” Dr. Peter Goadsby, an author on studies of both drugs, said in a statement. One of the researchers called migraine headaches the third most common medical disorder in the world. Both drugs must undergo larger trials to confirm the results. Both drugs are intended to prevent rather than treat migraine headaches, and the studies of them are the first to test monoclonal antibodies for migraine prevention, the scientists said.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Swiss pharmaceutical titan Novartis AG on Tuesday announced an overhaul of its operations that involved several multibillion-dollar deals with GlaxoSmithKline intended to allow Novartis to focus on its oncology business and boost profitability, the companies said. The spate of deals follows recent consolidations in the pharmaceutical industry with large price tags, including the $5.6-billion acquisition of an Anaheim specialty drug firm by Irish pharmaceutical company Mallinckrodt this month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2014 | Bloomberg News
Gene Estess, a broker who gave up the pay and perks of Wall Street for a second career helping New York City's homeless, has died. He was 78. He died April 9 at his home in Brooklyn, N.Y., according to his wife, Pat Schiff Estess. The cause was lung cancer, diagnosed about six months ago. Raised in Illinois on the Mississippi River, Estess found himself unable to ignore the inequality on the streets of New York. He remained interested in poverty and homelessness while living in the leafy suburb of Armonk in Westchester County and working as an options specialist at L.F. Rothschild & Co., an investment bank and brokerage firm.
SCIENCE
April 16, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Free samples of prescription drugs may seem like a great deal for patients. But even when doctors think they're doing patients a favor by handing out the freebies, the real beneficiaries are the drug manufacturers, according to new research in the journal JAMA Dermatology. Medical groups have grown increasingly wary about free drug samples, and they've already been banned by Kaiser Permanente, many academic medical centers, the Veterans Health Administration, the U.S. military and plenty of private medical clinics.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. has been crusading for more lenient treatment for nonviolent drug offenders, making it a top priority before he is expected to leave office this year. Recently, however, he has been forced to confront an epidemic of deaths from heroin and prescription drug abuse, one that his opponents have cited as a reason for not loosening drug sentences. In prepared remarks for a speech Wednesday, Holder cited the "stunning rise in heroin and prescription opiate overdose deaths" and vowed the Justice Department was committed to "rigorous enforcement" of the drug laws and "robust treatment" of drug addicts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Diana Marcum
A nearly yearlong investigation has led to the dismantling of a drug organization that distributed narcotics from Mexico to the Central Valley, and from there all over the country, authorities said Monday. At a Fresno news conference, California Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris said that a task force led by the Department of Justice had arrested 11 people and seized 56 pounds of methamphetamine, four kilograms of cocaine, 942 marijuana plants, one vehicle and nearly $269,000 in cash. The alleged network was known as the Magana organization and Harris said it was based in Tulare County.
OPINION
January 2, 2013
Re "Dying for relief," Dec. 30 In reading your series on abuses of prescription drugs, I wonder whether you have thought of the negative consequences of repeatedly trumpeting this "crisis" on the front page. There is no question that some people are going to over-medicate themselves with both legal and non-legal substances, and I applaud those physicians who take it upon themselves to look twice at patients. But whether all this adds up to a public health emergency that could be eliminated by Big Brother is doubtful.
WORLD
December 13, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
YARUMAL, Colombia - The unusually high incidence of early-onset Alzheimer's disease in this isolated cattle town has thrust it to the forefront of global efforts to find a cure for the debilitating malady. Next spring, 100 residents of this region in northwestern Colombia who are known to carry a mutant gene linked to the disease will begin taking a therapeutic drug produced by the U.S. biotechnology firm Genentech. The five-year clinical trial, called the Alzheimer's Prevention Initiative, will cost $100 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
Ken Dobson, a retired police officer, said he received quite a welcome when he landed his single-engine Cessna in Detroit two days after leaving his home in Palm Desert. Five sheriff's cars surrounded the plane and deputies got out with guns drawn. Then a helicopter arrived with four federal agents and a drug-sniffing dog. They demanded to see Dobson's pilot's license, asked about the flight and mentioned that his long trip from Southern California was suspicious. Fearing he would lose his flight credentials if he didn't cooperate, Dobson consented to a search of his plane.
SCIENCE
April 12, 2014 | Melissa Healy
Twenty-five years after scientists first identified the hepatitis C virus, doctors are declaring victory over an infection that afflicts more than 3 million Americans and kills more of them than HIV. In a series of clinical trial results, a new generation of antiviral medications was able to clear the liver-ravaging virus from virtually all patients' bloodstreams in as little as eight weeks. Even in patients with the most stubborn infections, the new drugs were capable of suppressing the virus completely at rates well over 90%. The treatments, however, come with a steep price tag. The "sustained virologic responses" reported in the trials typically mean an infection has been permanently cleared.
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