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NEWS
April 13, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
The trying task of reducing cocaine production overseas is made all the more daunting by the nation's appetite for the drug, which has grown more insatiable as "crack" cocaine has grown more popular. Despite recent inroads, anti-drug officials acknowledge that the amount of cocaine reaching the United States has never been greater. Unofficial estimates by the Drug Enforcement Administration put annual imports at more than 100 metric tons--a 35% increase over official 1985 figures compiled by the National Institute of Drug Abuse and a threefold increase over the cocaine influx in 1982.
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NEWS
April 16, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
Maybe Jerry Brown was more right about marijuana than folks gave him credit for -- at least if a new study on pot has merit. You may recall that California's governor, appearing on NBC's “Meet the Press” in March, had this to say about marijuana legalization : “How many people can get stoned and still have a great state or a great nation? The world's pretty dangerous, very competitive. I think we need to stay alert, if not 24 hours a day, more than some of the potheads might be able to put together.” Plenty of folks disagree with that view, of course (hey, the '60s die hard!
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SPORTS
October 16, 1990 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National swim team coaches from the United States, Hong Kong and Australia suspect the Chinese women's team of using steroids in the wake of China's world-best performances during last month's Asian Games. Richard Quick, coach of the U.S. national team and Stanford women's team, said he felt obligated to speak out after the Chinese produced three times that rank No. 1 in the world this year and three others that are No. 2 during the competition at Beijing.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2014 | By Evan Halper and Cindy Carcamo
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration handed backers of medical marijuana a significant victory Friday, opening the way for a University of Arizona researcher to examine whether pot can help veterans cope with post-traumatic stress, a move that could lead to broader studies into potential benefits of the drug. For years, scientists who have wanted to study how marijuana might be used to treat illness say they have been stymied by resistance from federal drug officials. The Arizona study had long ago been sanctioned by the Food and Drug Administration, but under federal rules, such experiments can use marijuana only from a single, government-run farm in Mississippi.
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In a finding that raises provocative questions about how a father's drug use might cause birth defects in his children, researchers have found that cocaine can attach itself to human sperm without impairing the sperm's survival or mobility. The results, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., suggest that sperm might carry cocaine or other toxins into an egg, triggering the kind of developmental problems in offspring already seen in animal studies.
NEWS
December 6, 1988 | JOHN PEKKANEN
I went into an anesthesiology residency and began my love affair with Fentanyl, a narcotic-anesthetic that we use all the time. I saw how great it made patients feel. I tried it intravenously. With Fentanyl, if you use it once, you are hooked. It removed every trace of anxiety and tension I had felt. But I never became so high that I felt detached; I felt efficient and in control. My mistake was in thinking I would always feel this way. Getting Fentanyl was ridiculously easy.
NEWS
May 29, 1987 | PENNY PAGANO, Times Staff Writer
The airplane crash that killed singer Rick Nelson and six others was caused by a fire that started in the cabin but apparently was not ignited by passengers using drugs, National Transportation Safety Board investigators said Thursday after an 18-month probe. Federal investigators said they could not determine conclusively the cause of the blaze, which filled the cabin and cockpit with smoke, but added that a likely source was a heater that reportedly had caused problems during the flight.
NEWS
October 19, 1988 | TAMARA JONES, Times Staff Writer
The moon, just out, hung over the Ozarks like a pale opal. Soon families would be saying grace over Sunday dinner; children would be clamoring to turn on the Christmas lights. It was time to go home. But in the darkening woods, four teen-agers lingered, enjoying the rush they always felt when they killed something. A kitten lay crumpled nearby. Sharing some unspoken secret, the boys exchanged furtive glances in the fading light. They were growing edgy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
Nancy Reagan has formally withdrawn her support of a proposed Los Angeles drug treatment center to be operated by Phoenix House and asked that 200 donors who pledged $5 million to the project be given the opportunity to transfer their donations to her own Nancy Reagan Foundation, The Times has learned. "This is a major disappointment to us," said Chris Policano, spokesman for Phoenix House in New York, a private foundation that operates a variety of drug programs across the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1993
Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center has fired or accepted resignations from 30 workers following a sixth-month investigation into allegations of misconduct, including on-the-job use of alcohol or drugs, a hospital spokeswoman said Wednesday. Their last day was Friday, said Laura Elek, spokeswoman at the 2,300-employee hospital. Hospital officials will not release the names or departments of those involved, but said they did not work directly with patients and that no doctors were involved.
OPINION
March 6, 2014
Re "Disillusionment over South Sudan," March 1 South Sudan's recent descent into violence brings to light the dangers of premature American disengagement from countries burdened by conflict. U.S. leaders and diplomats spent years ending two decades of war between the Sudanese government and an independence movement in South Sudan, investing significant time, energy and resources to forge a peace agreement, support a popular referendum and create an independent South Sudan. Our government hailed the outcome as a great victory.
OPINION
March 6, 2014
Re "Of guns and militias," Postscript, March 1 As Adam Winkler made abundantly clear in his debate with Mark Kalmansohn over the interpretation of the 2nd Amendment, this is not - and rightly should not be - about what the words mean today. It's about historical context. But all these interminable and clearly irreconcilable differences about the relevance of the predicate clause are, themselves, irrelevant. The real question is not what the 18th century framers meant by "militia" but what they meant by "arms.
OPINION
March 6, 2014
Re "Rep. Ryan calls for cuts in anti-poverty programs," March 4 So Rep. Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) proposes to reduce college Pell grants and child-care and welfare assistance programs. Odd that I didn't see any proposal to tax at ordinary income rates the so-called carried-interest income of hedge fund managers, whose tax-favored earnings frequently run into seven and eight figures. If Ryan's "use your oars to push everyone else away from the life raft" mentality is the economic plan of the GOP, despite the downward economic pressure the middle and lower middle classes have experienced over the last 30 years, I can only hope that the foundering middle class will vote against those who are causing it. And if Republicans think they'll somehow get even with the "takers" by this approach, they might want to remember that eight of the 10 states with the highest percentage of people who paid no federal income taxes in 2010 were red states in 2012.
OPINION
March 6, 2014
Re "Prescribers fuel drug epidemic," March 4 The Times offers a very simplistic analysis of America's drug dependence. As an emergency room physician, I see many chronic-pain patients who "run out" of their allotted opiates and then run to an emergency room. I am sometimes threatened with being sued for not giving them enough opiates. Patients have, unfortunately, interpreted their right to stabilizing emergency medical conditions as a right to obtain their opiate of choice. And don't forget the role of patient satisfaction scores.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Join Times staff writer Lisa Girion for an online chat at 12:30 p.m. on how doctors are fueling the nation's prescription drug epidemic. A new government study found that doctors now represent the primary source of narcotic painkillers for chronic abusers. It challenges the belief held by many, and that has long guided policymakers, that abusers have fueled the epidemic by getting their drugs without prescriptions. The study was published Monday by the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
NATIONAL
February 5, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Even the threat of death can't reliably stop a heroin addiction.  Paramedics tell stories about the tricks addicts use to save themselves from an overdose -- that is, to ensure that somebody else saves them. For instance, users will block a water drain in a public building so that someone will notice flooding and call 911. "Interestingly, we have received several calls for auto accidents," an Ohio emergency medical technician, or EMT, noted in a state addiction treatment survey published in November . "Apparently, some users are stopping in the parking lot, putting their car in 'drive' with foot on brake.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rasheeda Moore, the former model who cooperated with the FBI in setting up Washington Mayor Marion Barry's drug arrest, testified at his trial Wednesday that the two had used cocaine and other drugs "over 100 times." During the three years of a relationship that was also sexual, Moore testified, she and Barry used drugs at all hours and in all places--in hotels, borrowed apartments, government offices, a drug dealer's rooming house and Barry's own home.
OPINION
July 28, 2010 | By Evan Wood
Last week, thousands of scientists, physicians and activists fighting the HIV and AIDS pandemic around the world gathered in Vienna to discuss the latest breakthroughs — and frustrations. There were reports on several landmark studies describing the crucial role that treatments can play in reducing the infectiousness of HIV-positive individuals. And there was encouraging news from Africa, where a study found that an intra-vaginal anti-viral gel could reduce the risk of HIV infection among women who used it by 40%. But there was also sobering news at the 18th International AIDS Conference, including stark evidence of how the HIV epidemic is raging unchecked among some populations of illicit drug users.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2014 | By Matt Pearce and Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- Sometimes the traffickers inject liquid heroin into jeans so they can ship the drug where it needs to go. Sometimes it's a fake coconut or bananas. In a few cases, according to federal officials, heroin is injected into the bellies of dogs. However it arrives, hundreds of thousands Americans have been turning to heroin more and more in recent years, and officials across the country are sounding the alarm as fatal heroin overdoses have more than doubled in some states over the last decade.
NEWS
December 24, 2013 | By Cathleen Decker
The daughter of incoming New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Tuesday that she had suffered from clinical depression for years and, until recent therapy, abused alcohol and marijuana. Chiara de Blasio, 19, said that she was going public with the personal information in hopes of supporting others who were struggling. “Removing substances from my life, it's opened so many doors for me,” she said in a video posted on YouTube . “I was actually able to participate in my dad's campaign and that was like the greatest thing ever and now I'm doing well in school and actually getting to explore things that aren't just partying.
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