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Drug Abuse Los Angeles

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1994
In Column Right on June 9, Cal Thomas argues that Republicans who criticize Oliver North "dare not speak" their motive, namely that "weak men fear strong men." He calls us spineless for not supporting North's traditional values. The appalling truth is, too many Republicans have been spineless for remaining silent and not exposing the extent of North's amorality. For it is well documented that North is a narcotics trafficker! In 1990, North was banished for life by our neighbor, Costa Rica, which declared him persona non grata --the most severe non-criminal penalty a government can impose.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1989 | TERRY SMERLING, Terry Smerling is a judge in Los Angeles County Superior Court
Pronouncements from Washington beg the question of when our government will get serious about the drug epidemic. Under President Bush's "war on drugs," critical analysis and pragmatism are subordinated to the conventional political wisdom that the public demands a rigid law-and-order approach. Every President since Richard Nixon has had a similarly guided "war on drugs," and each of them failed miserably.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1988 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Hoping to achieve a "drug-free Police Department," the Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday requested $403,000 from the city for a special unit to test probationary officers for narcotics use. The proposed creation of the nine-member unit comes at a time when investigators from the Internal Affairs Division say they have their hands full with about 20 cases involving officers--veterans as well as rookies--who are alleged to have bought, used or sold drugs.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | MATT LAIT and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A high-level delegation of Los Angeles officials has snagged a federal grant large enough to pay for hundreds of new police officers over the next three years, sources familiar with the discussions said Thursday. Although a spokeswoman for Mayor Richard Riordan declined to confirm or deny any aspect of the grant, other sources said they have been told that the LAPD will receive enough money to hire up to 710 new police officers and pay about 90% of their salaries over the next three years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1989 | DAVID FERRELL and JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
National drug czar William J. Bennett made an unusual pitch to Hollywood's entertainment leaders on Monday to join the war on narcotics, dramatically comparing drug abuse in Los Angeles to the destruction of the Northern California earthquake. "We've all been seeing the newscasts about the earthquake, the epicenter up in San Jose," Bennett said. "This area, Los Angeles, may be the epicenter of a disaster inflicted by man on man.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2000 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Memories of racist terror linger among the African Americans who remain in this small town, even though nearly three years have passed since the last black man was slain in public. Black residents say they still don't dare to walk the streets at night. They remember the two men shot point-blank. They remember the young man beaten to death with a baseball bat by a mob in the supermarket parking lot.
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alan La Sha, director of the Pasadena AIDS Resource Center, saw the list in his morning newspaper, and his heart jumped. The list ranked 11 large California cities in which AIDS was the leading cause of death for young men in 1990. Pasadena ranked second. He thought the ranking meant that Pasadena had a higher rate of AIDS deaths than anywhere but San Francisco, which was No. 1 on the list. "I was very surprised," La Sha said. "It was an unanswered question for me--how could that possibly be?
NEWS
October 18, 1995 | LYNN SMITH and DENNIS ROMERO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With each new study, they appear more like wild, willful creatures, destined to usher in the end of civilization. But the most recent statistics have some people asking who are more frightening: kids today or the adults around them? The findings of last week's report from the Carnegie Corp.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Glendale Mayor Larry Zarian saw the list, the statistics jumped out at him. The list released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ranked 11 large California cities in which AIDS was the leading cause of death for young men in 1990. Pasadena ranked No. 2 and Zarian's city ranked No. 7. Calls poured into the mayor's KIEV-AM radio talk show. What's happening, callers demanded. Why Glendale? Why Pasadena? "I jumped like everybody else," Zarian said.
NEWS
October 24, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jay Tee Warner dropped to his knees. Man, he thought, this is powerful stuff. His head buzzed from the crack--the light, wonderful feeling that soon gives way to the sweat washing down his face and the ringing in his ears that leaves a terrifying silence in its wake. Normally, the high disappears after a few minutes, and then he feels awful. Not this time. This was the weirdest trip Warner had taken in 25 years of drug use. This rock tasted like medicine--like dope, like heroin.
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