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Drug Certification

OPINION
February 7, 1999 | SERGIO MUNOZ, Sergio Munoz is a Times editorial writer
It took President Clinton five years to finally get around to his 1997 visit to Mexico, the United States' most important neighbor. This month, Clinton will travel there again, but most foreign policy specialists are not expecting much of his one-day trip to Merida, the capital of Yucatan state, for talks with Mexican President Ernest Zedillo.
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NEWS
December 22, 1990 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trapped in the cross-fire between scientists, drug companies and certain AIDS activists, Dr. Ellen Cooper, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's top AIDS drug regulator, has requested a transfer to a less-pressured post within the agency. Cooper refused to comment on the move Friday, but friends, associates and an FDA spokesman confirmed her decision to step down. Many said her departure from her post as director of the FDA's Division of Anti-Viral Drug Products in Bethesda, Md.
HEALTH
August 25, 2003 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Patients who need help reducing their risk of heart attack and stroke now have one more cholesterol-lowering drug from which to choose. Like other statins, Crestor (rosuvastatin) partially blocks the production of cholesterol in the liver. It lowers total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or "bad" cholesterol, while increasing high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good" cholesterol. It also reduces triglycerides, another blood fat associated with the buildup of plaque in the arteries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1998 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The president of a Whittier Research Company was sentenced to 15 months in federal prison Tuesday for falsifying results of human drug tests submitted to the Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Robert A. Fiddes, 53, of Palos Verdes, pleaded guilty to a charge of making false statements to the FDA about drugs being considered for approval. Two employees at Fiddes' Southern California Research Institute are scheduled to be sentenced on similar charges today by U.S. District Judge Robert M. Takasugi.
NEWS
September 15, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
A former generic drug company executive was fined $250,000 and ordered to serve 60 days of an 18-month jail sentence after pleading guilty to bribing Food and Drug Administration officials, the U.S. attorney in Baltimore announced Thursday. Dilip P. Shah, 43, a founder and former president of Quad Pharmaceuticals Inc., also was ordered to devote 12 months of full-time community service to the American Cancer Society.
NEWS
July 29, 1995 | From Associated Press
A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel declined Friday to recommend approval--or disapproval--of a cheaper, generic version of the nation's most prescribed drug, saying it doesn't have enough information. The committee concluded there was "insufficient data" to determine if a generic estrogen drug had to contain all of the components that are in the top-selling Premarin, a hormone-replacement drug used by about 9 million post-menopausal women.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1994 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration has approved a popular prescription arthritis drug for marketing as an over-the-counter pain reliever--a move that will cause competitive headaches for the makers of Advil, Tylenol and other pain remedies. The drug, naproxen sodium, is the first non-prescription pain reliever to win FDA approval since ibuprofen a decade ago.
NEWS
February 13, 1996 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Balding Americans, take note: The federal government has just made it a little easier to wage war on Mother Nature. Eight years after approving the first and only known medical treatment for hereditary baldness, the FDA took that action one step further Monday, making Rogaine an over-the-counter drug as easy to obtain from a pharmacy as aspirin. The move, which reverses an earlier FDA decision, prompted the drug's manufacturer, Michigan-based Pharmacia & Upjohn Inc.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2004 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
Genentech Inc. on Thursday won Food and Drug Administration approval of its colon cancer drug Avastin, the first medication to shrink tumors by choking the blood vessels that feed them. Industry analysts said the drug could become a $2-billion-a-year product, which would make it the best-selling cancer medication to date. Wall Street drove Genentech's shares up 7%, adding $3.8 billion to the total market value of the South San Francisco company.
NEWS
September 11, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Two generic drug companies already immersed in bribery charges have more pervasive problems than originally thought, and the companies likely will be investigated by the Justice Department's criminal division, two key members of Congress say in documents to be made public today. An admitted bribery payment to Food and Drug Administration employees "appears to be only the tip of the iceberg in a story . . . rife with problems," according to statements by Reps. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.
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