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Drug Rehabilitation Programs

OPINION
December 31, 2000 | Charles L. Lindner, Charles L. Lindner is past president of the Los Angeles Criminal Bar Assn
Since the 1980s, California's penal system has been chiefly designed to punish, deter and avenge. As a result, the prison population has risen from 34,640, in 1982, to its current 161,291, of whom 38.6% are imprisoned for drug offenses. In last month's election, state voters overwhelmingly passed Proposition 36, which will funnel drug users who are guilty of no other crime into rehabilitation programs rather than prison.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2008 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
Just before dawn, shoveling cow manure in the milking barn, Ryan Medlin feels a world away from his wild life back in San Francisco. For the onetime homeless addict, that's a good thing. Last fall, Medlin was living out of his car, blowing his entire six-figure salary as a software engineer on crack and bourbon binges. At 33, he was so gaunt he was nearly skeletal. He walked slouched over, the nights scrunched up in his Suzuki hatchback playing havoc with the nerves in his right leg.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1995 | MARY MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Daniel, a member of Alcoholics Anonymous, recently spent about an hour at the Twelve-n-Twelve store in West Los Angeles looking for just the right gift to give a friend who has been sober for a year. "Being sober is a celebration," said Daniel, who stopped drinking six years ago. "Although I was alive before I got clean and sober, I wasn't really able to enjoy life."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2000 | PETER M. WARREN and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The state on Monday joined local agencies in probing allegations of drug use at a Santa Ana alcohol-and-drug treatment center, where dozens of residents were ousted over the weekend. Officials at the state Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs, which licenses residential treatment facilities, confirmed that an investigation was underway involving the treatment center, on North Cooper Street, operated by Cooper Fellowship Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1993 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Mimi Silbert were to run a classified ad for her new Los Angeles venture, it might read, "Wanted: A few bad men and women." Silbert is the head of San Francisco's acclaimed Delancey Street Foundation, an enterprise grounded in the principle that drug addicts and ex-convicts can turn their lives around if they want to. The foundation bought the defunct Midtown Hilton on Vermont Avenue near the Hollywood Freeway earlier this year and will reopen it today as Delancey Street Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2004 | Jean-Paul Renaud, Times Staff Writer
Skid row is as vivid in her thoughts today as it was 15 years ago. Back then, she would sneak into a dark alley, surrounded by the stench of the dumpsters she leaned against, and inject herself with heroin. The scars on her arm won't let her forget. Mary Santos, now director of substance abuse programs at Optimist Youth Homes & Family Services in Los Angeles, shares her story of living on the streets with dozens of teenagers referred to her by the courts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1996 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sounding more like a motivational speaker than a Municipal Court judge, Gregory H. Lewis looked around Department 101 in Orange County Superior Court one day this month, smiled and said to a room filled with about 100 people: "I like to see your faces! There's a lot of energy flowing." This is no ordinary day in Lewis' court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1999 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deborah Neroes held out her hand, waiting for a verdict. Sharon Obeck, a media training consultant, clasped it and shook hello. "Your hand is limp, telling me you're not interested," Obeck said. Neroes stepped back, took a deep breath and tried again. "Much better," Obeck said. "Now I know you're serious." For Neroes, a crack addict for 17 years, now sober for 128 days, this training session wasn't just about the first handshake in a job interview.
NEWS
October 21, 1992 | PAMELA WARRICK and CLAIRE SPIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In Los Feliz, as many as 55 recovering drug addicts and alcoholics are living in a single home, some packed 10 to a room, others squeezed into attic crawl spaces or closets. In South-Central Los Angeles, men struggling to stay off drugs surrender their welfare checks to sleep on plywood pallets in bare cubicles with exposed wiring. And on a shady street in Van Nuys, women seek shelter in the home of a therapist who has been accused of demanding sexual favors from female tenants.
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