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Drug Smuggling South America

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NEWS
April 13, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
For more than a decade, drug enforcement officials had stalked the man they called "the godfather" of Mexican cocaine trafficking, but Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo routinely eluded them through a network of secret ranches and urban safehouses, hidden telephone lines and police protection. Just last month, what were intended as surprise raids on three of the reputed drug lord's houses in Guadalajara came an hour too late and ended in another failure for U.S. and Mexican officials.
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NEWS
July 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
The House voted Tuesday to protect money for fighting drugs in South America from lawmakers who argued that foreign aid dollars would be better spent against AIDS and other world health problems.
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NEWS
February 13, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Monday he will not revise his formula for a joint U.S.-Soviet military reduction in Europe even though the Soviets have rejected the idea because it would leave U.S. forces with an additional 30,000 troops. Pointing to the geographical advantage the Soviet Union would have in redeploying units to Central and Eastern Europe west of Soviet borders, Bush said that "we've got a big ocean between us and . . . Western Europe" that would delay a speedy redeployment.
NEWS
February 15, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The underground railroad that slipped millions of Central Americans across the U.S. border in the 1980s is now smuggling Asians and Africans desperate for a chance to reach the United States. Arriving in South America as tourists, they sneak through the Amazon jungle to Colombia--a country known for the quality of its counterfeiting--to obtain forged Central American visas. With those visas, they are less likely to be stopped along the way.
NEWS
March 8, 1989
Rep. Charles B. Rangel (D-N.Y.), chairman of the House Select Committee on Narcotics, charged that President Bush has failed to make the war on drugs a priority in the nation's foreign policy and has sown confusion among South American leaders. Fresh from a meeting in Ecuador with more than 200 officials from five Andean nations, the congressman said it was "embarrassing" to talk with his South American counterparts about the U.S. commitment to battling drugs.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush will travel to Colombia this week for a highly symbolic drug summit that is unlikely to have a quick impact on the flow of cocaine from South America, according to officials involved in pre-summit negotiations. Months of preparations for the long-awaited meeting, intended to coordinate a multi-pronged attack on cocaine at its source, have produced only a 16-page communique that "could have been signed last fall," one source said. In the meantime, U.S.
NEWS
February 26, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two years after President Bush launched his "Andean strategy" to attack the supply of cocaine at its overseas source, the effort is wobbling noticeably and raising questions about whether its multimillion-dollar budget would be better spent elsewhere. The plan, which gives large aid infusions to the Andean nations of Bolivia, Colombia and Peru to beef up law enforcement and military strength there and to wean the nations' economies from drug production, has enjoyed crucial bipartisan support.
NEWS
June 1, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, in an effort to close off new smuggling routes used by South American drug traffickers, has drafted plans to expand the use of U.S. troops and military helicopters in Guatemala, the Dominican Republic and Jamaica, Bush Administration officials confirmed Sunday. Under one proposal now being circulated by the Administration to lawmakers, about a dozen U.S.
NEWS
February 6, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Drug Enforcement Administration has moved to block U.S. chemical shipments to 52 South American companies on grounds that the solvents they import are likely to be used in the production of cocaine, congressional sources said Monday. The move, authorized under new legislation, comes as revised intelligence estimates indicate that as much as 70% of all the solvents shipped by the United States to the Andean nations wind up as ingredients in cocaine processing, the sources said.
NEWS
August 19, 1988 | Reuters
South American drug barons are setting their sights on Britain and continental Europe as potentially rich markets for cocaine, junior Foreign Office minister Tim Eggar told a radio interviewer Thursday. Eggar had just finished a tour of South America's chief cocaine growing and manufacturing nations, principally Colombia and Peru.
NEWS
June 9, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN and CRAIG PYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From land, sea, air and outer space, a score of federal agencies now employ billions of dollars in high technology to try to track and intercept hundreds of tons of cocaine that feed an illegal U.S. drug market worth an estimated $38 billion a year. Still, despite the most sophisticated surveillance technology on the globe--from U.S.
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the days since the dramatic arrest and expulsion of North America's most-wanted accused drug trafficker, Juan Garcia Abrego, just 15 pounds of cocaine have been confiscated throughout Mexico. Two days after Garcia Abrego's capture by 15 drug agents outside Monterrey, 50 heavily armed officers tried to capture a wanted mid-level drug dealer inside the city. But the dealer escaped in a blizzard of gunfire. And just 72 hours after Garcia Abrego's arrest, which U.S. Atty. Gen.
NEWS
June 1, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, in an effort to close off new smuggling routes used by South American drug traffickers, has drafted plans to expand the use of U.S. troops and military helicopters in Guatemala, the Dominican Republic and Jamaica, Bush Administration officials confirmed Sunday. Under one proposal now being circulated by the Administration to lawmakers, about a dozen U.S.
NEWS
February 29, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After President Bush's drug summit with Latin American leaders this week, prospects for cutting off the flow of cocaine at its source seem as bleak as ever. Although the six presidents at the Thursday meeting in San Antonio proclaimed a "new spirit of cooperation," Bush obviously was at odds with at least some of the others over anti-drug strategy. Their differences, in essence, are about guns versus butter.
NEWS
February 28, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and the leaders of six Latin American nations proclaimed a "new spirit of cooperation" in the war on drugs Thursday, but they disagreed publicly over how to proceed in an effort that they conceded is far from successful. They also sought to reduce their reliance on Latin American armies to fight the war--a step that appeared to be a retreat from a three-year Bush Administration initiative.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of a seven-nation drug meeting, Peru has refused to go along with a U.S.-backed plan calling for sharp reductions in cocaine supplies unless the United States provides more money for the counternarcotics fight, senior Administration officials said Wednesday. The demand puts President Bush in an awkward position, because his Administration is under attack by critics who say that the U.S. war on drugs already subsidizes Peruvian corruption and brutality.
NEWS
April 15, 1988 | Associated Press
Police in Rome arrested three South Americans after a raid on their home led to the seizure of 11 pounds of pure cocaine with an estimated street value of $6 million, Italian news reports said Thursday.
NEWS
February 4, 1990 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what law enforcement officials said was the largest narcotics bust in Orange County history, more than two tons of cocaine were seized Friday night from a Fullerton warehouse described as a distribution center for the drug. No arrests were made in the raid, but FBI agents believe the 4,719 pounds of cocaine came from sophisticated drug cartels operating in South America. Authorities estimated the cache has a street value of $343.2 million.
NEWS
February 26, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two years after President Bush launched his "Andean strategy" to attack the supply of cocaine at its overseas source, the effort is wobbling noticeably and raising questions about whether its multimillion-dollar budget would be better spent elsewhere. The plan, which gives large aid infusions to the Andean nations of Bolivia, Colombia and Peru to beef up law enforcement and military strength there and to wean the nations' economies from drug production, has enjoyed crucial bipartisan support.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1991
Torrance police have made the biggest drug bust in the department's history, netting $100 million worth of cocaine in a raid directly related to last week's arrest of four suspects alleged to be members of a South American drug-trafficking network. The latest cocaine stash--2,300 pounds--was found Friday night in boxes in bedroom closets in a West Covina house. The day before, police seized 100 pounds of cocaine--worth an estimated $5 million--in a Hacienda Heights house.
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