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Drug Testing

SPORTS
July 24, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Tim Salmon, whose career coincided with the height of the steroid era, said Wednesday he is delighted that the current generation of players has risen up and spoken up against the use of performance-enhancing drugs. “What I'm really proud of in our game right now,” Salmon said, “is the groundswell of players taking a stand and saying they're frustrated with the situation.” Salmon, the Angels' franchise leader in home runs, spent his entire career (1992-2006) in Anaheim.
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SPORTS
July 15, 2013 | By Philip Hersh
Hey, pro cycling: Move over on that trash heap so there is some room for track and field. Almost exactly a decade after the BALCO scandal all but destroyed track's credibility, the sport is facing another legitimacy crisis. Sunday, leading U.S. sprinter Tyson Gay and Jamaica's Asafa Powell, Olympic gold medalist and former world-record holder in the 100 meters, confirmed they had tested positive for banned substances. There were news reports saying Powell was among five Olympic gold medalists from Jamaica who tested positive for stimulants at their national championships last month.
SPORTS
July 14, 2013 | By David Wharton
Just weeks before the world championships in Moscow, the sport of track and field has suffered a major blow with three marquee sprinters testing positive for banned substances. American 100-meter record holder Tyson Gay and Jamaica's Asafa Powell and Sherone Simpson all acknowledged Sunday they had failed drug tests. Gay, who owns the fastest 100-meter time in the world this season, plans to withdraw from the championships. That would deprive the meet of its most-anticipated event, a showdown with six-time Olympic champion Usain Bolt.
SPORTS
July 14, 2013 | By David Wharton
Call it "Black Sunday" for the sport of track and field. Hours after news broke that American sprinter Tyson Gay tested positive for a banned substance, two marquee Jamaican athletes acknowledged that they, too, had failed drug tests. Asafa Powell, who won a gold medal in the 400-meter relay at the 2008 Summer Games, and Sherone Simpson, a three-time Olympic medalist, expressed dismay at the results. "I want to be clear in saying to my family, friends, and most of all my fans worldwide that I have never knowingly or willfully taken any supplements or substances that break any rules," Powell said in a statement sent to The Times.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Karin Klein
If a driver were involved in a crash locally and alcohol or drugs could have been an issue, police will usually have the driver tested. It wouldn't matter if he or she were a tourist from another country, or a visitor here to do some corporate business. Why, then, is it different for pilots of airliners that crash? This puzzling dichotomy was revealed Tuesday in a news conference about the Asiana Airlines crash in San Francisco. According to Deborah Hersman, chairwoman of the National Transportation Safety Board, federal rules call for key crew members involved in an accident to receive drug and alcohol testing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2013 | By Kate Mather and Lee Romney
Each of the five apparatus operators who responded to Saturday's Asiana Flight 214 crash at San Francisco International Airport tested negative for drugs or alcohol, San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White said Monday.  In an interview with The Times, Hayes-White said her department's own internal inquiry is underway after department officials learned an apparatus responding to Saturday's plane crash may have "contacted" one of the two...
SPORTS
July 3, 2013 | By Lance Pugmire
Major League Baseball's decision to terminate a veteran umpire last month after a reported positive drug test stirs questions about the consequences of sports' arbiters slipping to possible outcome-altering temptation. "Just because you're a sports official at the highest level doesn't mean you don't have troubles," said Barry Mano, president of the National Assn. of Sports Officials. "We pride ourselves on who we are - people of integrity with high values and strong character. "It doesn't mean there aren't missteps or wrong decisions.
SPORTS
June 20, 2013 | By Lance Pugmire
Juan Manuel Marquez was subjected to skepticism in December when the newly buffed-up multichampion boxer knocked Manny Pacquiao out stone cold, the first time Pacquaio hit the canvas in the pair's five fights. Now, Marquez, in advance of his Oct. 12 world welterweight title fight at Thomas and Mack Center in Las Vegas against Palm Springs' Timothy Bradley, is due to be subjected to an unspecified number of random drug tests. There remains, however, some questions about who will preside over the testing.
SPORTS
May 7, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
This story would be funny if it weren't so sad. Texas Longhorns pitcher Corey Knebel was suspended from the team on Friday because he substituted his urine sample for a teammate's to prevent the teammate from failing a drug test. Problem: Knebel's urine sample failed the test. According to the Austin American-Statesman , Knebel agreed to let the teammate use his sample to avoid detection for having taken Adderall, which is used to treat ADHD. Adderall is on the NCAA's banned list of substances, unless you have a doctor's prescription for it to treat ADHD or narcolepsy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2013 | By Kate Mather and Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
A man who allegedly crashed his car through a Wal-Mart and began attacking people inside, injuring four, was being held without bail Monday in San Jose. Authorities said Haamid Ade Zaid, 33, was arrested on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon, hit and run, and drug use. Authorities told the Associated Press they believe he was under the influence of drugs. "People were running out of the store, people were crying," San Jose police Officer Albert Morales told the San Jose Mercury News about the Sunday incident.
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