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Drug Trafficking Latin America

NEWS
January 17, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling a potential change in congressional sentiment, staunch pro-Israel Sen. Bob Dole (R-Kan.) called Tuesday for shifting at least $330 million in U.S. foreign aid from Israel and four other key recipients to Panama, Latin America's drug-fighting countries and Eastern Europe's "new democracies."
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NEWS
January 13, 1990 | Reuters
Narcotics traffickers are turning their attention from affluent consumer countries to the developing world, the head of a U.N. anti-drugs agency said Friday. "Latin America could explode. We are in a situation that is very close to total collapse," Giuseppe di Gennaro, executive director of the U.N. Fund for Drug Abuse Control, said.
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of the Bush Administration's use of a military invasion to oust a leader accused of drug trafficking in Panama, U.S. officials are striving to prevent adverse Latin American reaction from hampering its drug-interdiction efforts in other countries in the region. Bush Administration diplomatic officials won agreement this week from the Peruvian government to reverse its declared halt to cooperative drug-fighting operations with U.S. agents in that country.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Escalating its protest of the U.S. invasion of Panama, Peru delivered a blow to the Bush Administration's anti-drug strategy Friday by pulling out of programs to find and destroy cocaine laboratories in the Andes. An Administration official said that President Alan Garcia's government broke off the $10-million-a-year U.S.-Peruvian program one day after it called for cancellation of a planned Andean summit conference on drugs.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Peru, a key ally in the war on drugs, called Thursday for cancellation of the upcoming Andean summit conference on drugs, a signal that Latin America's displeasure over the U.S. invasion of Panama has emerged as a serious threat to President Bush's anti-narcotics campaign. U.S. drug fighters officially maintained a stiff upper lip, saying that it is too early to speculate about adverse side effects that the U.S. move into Panama may have on their efforts.
NEWS
December 19, 1989 | Reuters
The presidents of the Andean nations of Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Venezuela and Ecuador wound up a summit meeting in Ecuador's Galapagos Islands on Monday, urging consumer nations to back the war on illegal drugs and fair prices for their countries' goods to discourage the cultivation of coca.
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
A senator Thursday called on the Bush Administration to investigate whether chemicals exported by U.S. manufacturers are being used by drug traffickers in Latin America as an ingredient to produce cocaine. Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said in a letter to Drug Control Policy Director William J. Bennett that his concern was prompted by a Dec. 5 report in The Times that the vast majority of the chemicals used in cocaine production originate in the United States.
NEWS
July 19, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
William J. Bennett, director of the Administration's war on drugs, Tuesday described what he said are the highlights of his national anti-drug strategy, saying it will focus on blighted urban areas and attempt to recapture them from "the bad guys." The projected focus would mark a departure from previous federal efforts, which were aimed primarily at seizing narcotics being smuggled into the country and combatting drug cartels.
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