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Drug Trafficking Mexico

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NEWS
November 30, 1988 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Brian Bennett grew up in a three-bedroom house with seven brothers and sisters on a fading stretch of West Florence Avenue in South-Central Los Angeles. By the time he was 22, he was paying his rent in a fashionable apartment complex off Wilshire Boulevard with $100 bills and doing business from Detroit to Denmark, where, according to federal investigators, he once ran up an $11,000 hotel bill in four days.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
With a title that translates as the punning "Miss Bullet," the Mexican film "Miss Bala" is based in part on the real-life story of a beauty pageant winner who was arrested alongside a drug gang and paraded before the media amid accusations of corruption behind her crown. It aims to not only be a provocative, thoughtful action film for the art house, looking at the overwhelming problems of the drug-trafficking epidemic in Mexico, but "Miss Bala" also marks an ambitiously bold step forward for director Gerardo Naranjo.
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NEWS
May 4, 1993 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of Mexico's top mafia chiefs, Emilio Quintero Payan, was shot to death by police in a suburban shopping center on the outskirts of Mexico City, U.S. and Mexican officials confirmed Monday. Quintero Payan, who allegedly ran heroin, cocaine and marijuana smuggling operations from his home state of Sinaloa, was killed Thursday, a day after the former attorney general of Sinaloa was gunned down in a Mexico City park. Officials are still investigating what seem to be links between the two cases.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hidden away on the top floor of the Defense Secretariat here is a museum that would truly blow the minds of Cheech and Chong. Dedicated to Mexico's fierce war on drug cultivation and traffic, the museum is equal parts memorial, instructional tool and grudging appreciation of the absurdly creative mind of Mexico's public enemy No. 1. "Their ingenuity has no limits," Capt. V.M.
NEWS
November 20, 1991 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before he was shot to death at a Guadalajara intersection last month, Manuel Salcido Uzeta was one of Mexico's most-wanted drug lords. El Cochiloco, or "Crazy Pig," as he was called for his violent rages, had been hunted by Mexican and American officials, as well as by the international police agency Interpol. Apparently they didn't look very hard.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rafael Aguilar Guajardo, a former federal police officer and one of Mexico's most-wanted drug traffickers, was shot to death while vacationing with his family in the Caribbean resort of Cancun, officials confirmed Wednesday. An American tourist from Colorado also was killed in the attack in the southeastern state of Quintana Roo. She apparently was walking by at the time of the shooting and was caught in the automatic gunfire.
NEWS
May 28, 2000 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the dead of night, a man pulled his van into a driveway in a peaceful Santa Clarita neighborhood and quietly opened a multimillion-dollar stash house for one of the most violent drug cartels in Mexico. He had picked a neat two-story home in Valencia to store millions in income from drug deals before the money was shipped to Mexico.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | Associated Press
Mexico's Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a man suspected of being a top drug trafficker can be extradited to the United States to face charges if he is arrested by Mexican police. The court upheld a lower court ruling that rejected Miguel Caro Quintero's effort to block his extradition, a court official said on condition of anonymity. Caro Quintero controls a large portion of drug trafficking along Mexico's northwestern border with the U.S.
NEWS
September 19, 1998 | PATRICK McDONNELL and KEN ELLINGWOOD and HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The principal target of the massacre that left 18 people dead just outside this Baja California resort was a known drug gang leader, and the killings were probably the result of a feud between drug traffickers, Mexican officials said Friday. Fermin Castro, also known to authorities as "the Ice Man," was critically wounded in Thursday's predawn attack, in which Castro and 20 members of his extended family, including eight children, were dragged from their beds and shot execution-style.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spooky, Puma, Popeye: the homeboys of the Calle Treinta gang earned their monikers in the old San Diego barrio of Logan Heights, a working-class enclave hemmed in by freeways, docks and a warehouse wasteland. Stealing cars, dealing PCP, dueling for control of narrow streets, they established themselves as a fierce but unremarkable Latino street gang. That was until about two years ago, when the gangsters who hung out at the park on 30th Street underwent a chilling metamorphosis.
NEWS
January 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
With a city plagued by drugs and violence as a backdrop, President Vicente Fox on Wednesday declared a nationwide war on narcotics trafficking and organized crime. "Today we initiate this great crusade," Fox said in Culiacan, the capital of Sinaloa, a Pacific coast state long considered the cradle of Mexico's extensive drug trade. "I pledge a war without mercy."
NEWS
January 23, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even by Mexican standards of corruption, the case was jolting: In an apparent sting operation, police nabbed as a suspect the top federal law enforcement official overseeing the border drug-trafficking hub of Ciudad Juarez. Norberto Suarez Gomez, the Mexican attorney general's chief representative in the state of Chihuahua, was arrested Dec. 30 on suspicion of trying to sell a law enforcement job for nearly half a million dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2000 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As an Associated Press reporter on the Mexican border in the mid-'90s, I didn't need to go far for stories on drugs or corruption, or the unique blend of tragedy and absurdity that typically followed. But none of the players on the border near Tijuana fascinated me as much as the Mexican lawman. Not the flashy drug kingpins or the granola-eating human rights advocates who stood up to them.
NEWS
December 15, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. authorities offered a $2-million reward Thursday for the arrest of an alleged Mexican drug lord who is accused of detaining and nearly killing two American federal agents just south of the U.S. border. The agents' confrontation with Osiel Cardenas was one of the most dangerous in years for American anti-drug personnel working abroad, U.S. officials said. Authorities said Thursday that Cardenas had been indicted in a U.S. court on charges of drug-dealing and assaulting federal agents.
NEWS
October 8, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As commander of a decorated Mexican navy gunboat, Capt. Ignacio Lopez has seen it all. Bombardments. Secret missions. Ambushes of enemy vessels. Pretty heady stuff, especially since his navy hasn't faced military combat since World War II. These days, Enemy No. 1 for Lopez, 44, is the fishing vessels and "Miami Vice"-type speedboats hauling tons of Colombian cocaine through the eastern Pacific. This is becoming the route of choice for drug smugglers and a source of alarm for U.S.
NEWS
September 1, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two senior army generals were jailed Thursday on drug trafficking charges, in one of the biggest public scandals to hit Mexico's secretive military in decades, officials announced. "This is an important breakthrough. It establishes a precedent," said Roderic A. Camp, a political scientist at Claremont College near Los Angeles and an expert on Mexico's military. At the urging of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An FBI forensics expert testified Tuesday in Los Angeles federal court that hair fibers found in the house where U.S. drug agent Enrique Camarena was murdered matched hair samples taken from defendant Juan Ramon Matta Ballesteros' head after his arrest. Matta is one of four men being tried in Camarena's abduction and murder. Matta, 45, contends that he was not at the house in Guadalajara, Mexico, where the agent was interrogated and killed in February, 1985.
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hit on Amado Carrillo Fuentes happened so fast that no one at the Ochoa Bali Hai restaurant was sure at first what had just occurred. Nearly a dozen assassins strode through the front door of the chic seafood restaurant carrying machine guns like briefcases, witnesses said. They moved toward the table where alleged drug baron Carrillo, his wife and their six children were finishing their meal. Then, just before 10 p.m., they opened fire.
NEWS
June 24, 2000 | Associated Press
Mexican officials said Friday that they were investigating whether the attempted killing of a national news anchorwoman was organized by drug traffickers. Lilly Tellez, a news anchorwoman of the national TV Azteca network, was leaving the station in Mexico City late Thursday when assailants opened fire on her car. Tellez escaped injury, but her two bodyguards and her driver were injured. Officials said witnesses saw three attackers traveling in two cars. The motive for the shooting was unclear.
NEWS
May 28, 2000 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the dead of night, a man pulled his van into a driveway in a peaceful Santa Clarita neighborhood and quietly opened a multimillion-dollar stash house for one of the most violent drug cartels in Mexico. He had picked a neat two-story home in Valencia to store millions in income from drug deals before the money was shipped to Mexico.
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