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May 23, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - A top Mexican drug cartel commander pleaded guilty Thursday in U.S. District Court  in the 2011 ambush attack south of the border that left one American agent dead and a second injured, and three other defendants also admitted their roles in the shootings that sharply strained U.S.-Mexico relations and has prosecutors still hunting for more suspects. The developments in federal court in Washington also provided new details about the ambush, showing that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement special agents Jaime Zapata and Victor Avila were traveling near San Luis Potosi, Mexico, when a Los Zetas Cartel convoy forced them off the road and two “armed hit squads” surrounded their vehicle and demanded they step out. When the agents refused and identified themselves as American diplomats from the U.S.  Embassy, the assailants “fired weapons near and into the vehicle, striking both agents,” court records show.
February 27, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
An alleged drug supplier went on trial in Orange County on Thursday  on charges that he killed a man he believed had stolen drugs from his dealers. Jose Felix Zepeda, 41, is charged with felony special circumstances murder during the commission of a robbery, felony kidnapping and felony conspiracy to commit a crime. If convicted, he faces a maximum sentence of life in state prison without parole. Zepeda has pleaded not guilty to all charges. Prosecutors say that in April 2012, Zepeda supplied three pounds of methamphetamine to two men who were supposed to sell the drugs to a buyer.
December 28, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - An American citizen died while in custody of the U.S. Border Patrol after being arrested on suspicion of possession of marijuana, authorities said. The death occurred early on Christmas Day at the Border Patrol's Campo Station in southern San Diego County. The name and age of the dead man were not released. The Border Patrol said that the man "became incoherent and unresponsive" while in a holding cell after being arrested early Tuesday evening. After midnight, paramedics attempted CPR but were unable to revive the man, the Border Patrol said.
January 2, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
This just might be a case of life imitating art: On Thursday, Florida officials announced that they arrested a "Breaking Bad" contest winner on suspicion of helping run a nationwide drug ring out of his home. However, instead of making meth, like the chemistry teacher in the popular show, Ryan Lee Carroll and two other men converted their apartment's garage into an elaborate lab for making synthetic marijuana, likely for large-scale distribution, according to the Lee County Sheriff's Office.
March 8, 2012 | By Brian Bennett, Los Angeles Times
Despite intensified counter-narcotics efforts over the last five years, the military's ability to stop drug smuggling into the U.S. from Latin America has declined as planes and ships have been diverted to combat operations around the globe, according to a senior military officer. As a result, the Navy and Coast Guard are stopping one of three suspected seaborne drug shipments headed to American shores, Gen. Douglas Fraser, commander of the U.S. Southern Command, told reporters Wednesday.
January 23, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Allergan Inc., the Irvine maker of the wrinkle filler Botox, agreed to buy a Silicon Valley pharmaceutical company in a deal valued at $958 million to gain an experimental inhalable migraine treatment. Allergan will pay Map Pharmaceuticals Inc. investors $25 a share, a 60% premium over Tuesday's closing price of $15.58 in New York, the companies said in a statement. The deal was unanimously approved by the boards of both companies and is expected to close late in the first quarter or in the second quarter, the companies said.
April 14, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Alzheimer’s research is continuing -- that’s one bright side we can take from the mixed Alzheimer’s news this week.   The positive news came when researchers announced they might be able to spot Alzheimer’s in the brain nearly a decade before the disease begins to show. In a new study led by Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, researchers used MRIs to assess the brains of two groups of people. Those with smaller Alzheimer’s-related areas were more likely to develop the disease 7 to 11 years down the road.
May 15, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
A Maryland microbiologist and international pathogen expert is on a one-woman mission to raise awareness about Aeromonas hydrophila, the waterborne bacteria believed to have caused the case of necrotizing faciitis -- better known as infection caused by flesh-eating bacteria -- that has proved devastating to a Georgia college student. Aimee Copeland's leg and part of her abdomen have been removed in a race to stay ahead of the disease. Her family's blog says the 24-year-old is likely to lose her fingers, and possibly her remaining foot.
February 5, 1995
Thank you, thank you, thank you for calling alcohol a "drug" rather than a "drink" in the story about alcohol use in Little Saigon (Jan. 9). RICHARD SHOWSTACK Newport Beach
December 13, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
YARUMAL, Colombia - The unusually high incidence of early-onset Alzheimer's disease in this isolated cattle town has thrust it to the forefront of global efforts to find a cure for the debilitating malady. Next spring, 100 residents of this region in northwestern Colombia who are known to carry a mutant gene linked to the disease will begin taking a therapeutic drug produced by the U.S. biotechnology firm Genentech. The five-year clinical trial, called the Alzheimer's Prevention Initiative, will cost $100 million.
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