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BUSINESS
March 5, 2013 | By Shan Li
Mexican drug kingpin Joaquin "Chapo" Guzman has fallen off Forbes magazine's annual list of the world's billionaires. Guzman, who has been in hiding since escaping from a maximum-security prison in 2001, is chieftain of the Sinaloa cartel, Mexico's biggest and oldest drug-trafficking network. He first made the billionaire list in 2009 and remained on it until this year. Luisa Kroll, an editor at Forbes, said that Guzman's "whereabouts are unknown" and therefore it's difficult to verify his assets.
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WORLD
January 8, 2009 | Reuters
Mexico has captured one of the founders of the Gulf drug cartel's brutal "Zetas" squad of hitmen that is behind much of the country's bloodshed, the attorney general's office said Thursday. Miguel Angel Soto Parra, arrested Wednesday in Mexico City, is a former police officer who was one of the earliest members of the Zetas, a group of hitmen made up largely of army deserters, a source at the attorney general's office said. President Felipe Calderon has scored a number of big arrests since he sent the army to crack down on drug gangs.
NEWS
February 20, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Could freestyle skier Sarah Burke, who died Jan. 19, nine days after a devastating crash, have been helped by an experimental drug? A new study offers a glimmer of hope for future victims of traumatic brain injury. In the hours after she has sustained a blow to the head, the victim of a traumatic injury experiences a slow down of blood flow to the brain--arguably when she needs it most. That mismatch between a brain's response and its needs in the wake of injury has set many a neuroscientist thinking: Can a way be found to keep the flow of oxygenated blood pumping normally?
NATIONAL
May 23, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - A top Mexican drug cartel commander pleaded guilty Thursday in U.S. District Court  in the 2011 ambush attack south of the border that left one American agent dead and a second injured, and three other defendants also admitted their roles in the shootings that sharply strained U.S.-Mexico relations and has prosecutors still hunting for more suspects. The developments in federal court in Washington also provided new details about the ambush, showing that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement special agents Jaime Zapata and Victor Avila were traveling near San Luis Potosi, Mexico, when a Los Zetas Cartel convoy forced them off the road and two “armed hit squads” surrounded their vehicle and demanded they step out. When the agents refused and identified themselves as American diplomats from the U.S.  Embassy, the assailants “fired weapons near and into the vehicle, striking both agents,” court records show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - An American citizen died while in custody of the U.S. Border Patrol after being arrested on suspicion of possession of marijuana, authorities said. The death occurred early on Christmas Day at the Border Patrol's Campo Station in southern San Diego County. The name and age of the dead man were not released. The Border Patrol said that the man "became incoherent and unresponsive" while in a holding cell after being arrested early Tuesday evening. After midnight, paramedics attempted CPR but were unable to revive the man, the Border Patrol said.
NATIONAL
January 2, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
This just might be a case of life imitating art: On Thursday, Florida officials announced that they arrested a "Breaking Bad" contest winner on suspicion of helping run a nationwide drug ring out of his home. However, instead of making meth, like the chemistry teacher in the popular show, Ryan Lee Carroll and two other men converted their apartment's garage into an elaborate lab for making synthetic marijuana, likely for large-scale distribution, according to the Lee County Sheriff's Office.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Allergan Inc., the Irvine maker of the wrinkle filler Botox, agreed to buy a Silicon Valley pharmaceutical company in a deal valued at $958 million to gain an experimental inhalable migraine treatment. Allergan will pay Map Pharmaceuticals Inc. investors $25 a share, a 60% premium over Tuesday's closing price of $15.58 in New York, the companies said in a statement. The deal was unanimously approved by the boards of both companies and is expected to close late in the first quarter or in the second quarter, the companies said.
NEWS
April 14, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Alzheimer’s research is continuing -- that’s one bright side we can take from the mixed Alzheimer’s news this week.   The positive news came when researchers announced they might be able to spot Alzheimer’s in the brain nearly a decade before the disease begins to show. In a new study led by Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, researchers used MRIs to assess the brains of two groups of people. Those with smaller Alzheimer’s-related areas were more likely to develop the disease 7 to 11 years down the road.
WORLD
August 10, 2010 | By Brendan Brady and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
He meanders through a city park with friends, sniffing glue out of a plastic bag. Many nights he passes out on the sidewalk nearby. It's a bleak routine, but this 17-year-old prefers it to his stints at Choam Chao, one of the Cambodian government's controversial drug rehabilitation centers, where he was twice detained. "At night, when they got drunk, sometimes they'd beat me," he said, referring to older detainees deputized by the guards to enforce discipline. His tormentors were rewarded, he said, with occasional trips out of the center's compound, when they could buy their liquor.
WORLD
March 8, 2012 | By Brian Bennett, Los Angeles Times
Despite intensified counter-narcotics efforts over the last five years, the military's ability to stop drug smuggling into the U.S. from Latin America has declined as planes and ships have been diverted to combat operations around the globe, according to a senior military officer. As a result, the Navy and Coast Guard are stopping one of three suspected seaborne drug shipments headed to American shores, Gen. Douglas Fraser, commander of the U.S. Southern Command, told reporters Wednesday.
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