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WORLD
December 13, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
YARUMAL, Colombia - The unusually high incidence of early-onset Alzheimer's disease in this isolated cattle town has thrust it to the forefront of global efforts to find a cure for the debilitating malady. Next spring, 100 residents of this region in northwestern Colombia who are known to carry a mutant gene linked to the disease will begin taking a therapeutic drug produced by the U.S. biotechnology firm Genentech. The five-year clinical trial, called the Alzheimer's Prevention Initiative, will cost $100 million.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
"Pusher" is an English-language, London-set remake of Danish filmmaker Nicolas Winding Refn's debut feature, directed by the Spanish-born Luis Prieto. While it has the seeds of a distinctive, cross-cultural crime film, it feels mostly like some sort of experiment to crosswire the neon pastels and electronic thump of Refn's recent "Drive" with the grimier style of his earlier work. Frank (Richard Coyle), a mid-level drug dealer, finds himself in over his head when his debts start to mount and a big deal doesn't come through.
WORLD
January 8, 2009 | Reuters
Mexico has captured one of the founders of the Gulf drug cartel's brutal "Zetas" squad of hitmen that is behind much of the country's bloodshed, the attorney general's office said Thursday. Miguel Angel Soto Parra, arrested Wednesday in Mexico City, is a former police officer who was one of the earliest members of the Zetas, a group of hitmen made up largely of army deserters, a source at the attorney general's office said. President Felipe Calderon has scored a number of big arrests since he sent the army to crack down on drug gangs.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2013 | By Shan Li
Mexican drug kingpin Joaquin "Chapo" Guzman has fallen off Forbes magazine's annual list of the world's billionaires. Guzman, who has been in hiding since escaping from a maximum-security prison in 2001, is chieftain of the Sinaloa cartel, Mexico's biggest and oldest drug-trafficking network. He first made the billionaire list in 2009 and remained on it until this year. Luisa Kroll, an editor at Forbes, said that Guzman's "whereabouts are unknown" and therefore it's difficult to verify his assets.
NEWS
February 20, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Could freestyle skier Sarah Burke, who died Jan. 19, nine days after a devastating crash, have been helped by an experimental drug? A new study offers a glimmer of hope for future victims of traumatic brain injury. In the hours after she has sustained a blow to the head, the victim of a traumatic injury experiences a slow down of blood flow to the brain--arguably when she needs it most. That mismatch between a brain's response and its needs in the wake of injury has set many a neuroscientist thinking: Can a way be found to keep the flow of oxygenated blood pumping normally?
NATIONAL
May 23, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - A top Mexican drug cartel commander pleaded guilty Thursday in U.S. District Court  in the 2011 ambush attack south of the border that left one American agent dead and a second injured, and three other defendants also admitted their roles in the shootings that sharply strained U.S.-Mexico relations and has prosecutors still hunting for more suspects. The developments in federal court in Washington also provided new details about the ambush, showing that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement special agents Jaime Zapata and Victor Avila were traveling near San Luis Potosi, Mexico, when a Los Zetas Cartel convoy forced them off the road and two “armed hit squads” surrounded their vehicle and demanded they step out. When the agents refused and identified themselves as American diplomats from the U.S.  Embassy, the assailants “fired weapons near and into the vehicle, striking both agents,” court records show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - An American citizen died while in custody of the U.S. Border Patrol after being arrested on suspicion of possession of marijuana, authorities said. The death occurred early on Christmas Day at the Border Patrol's Campo Station in southern San Diego County. The name and age of the dead man were not released. The Border Patrol said that the man "became incoherent and unresponsive" while in a holding cell after being arrested early Tuesday evening. After midnight, paramedics attempted CPR but were unable to revive the man, the Border Patrol said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
An alleged drug supplier went on trial in Orange County on Thursday  on charges that he killed a man he believed had stolen drugs from his dealers. Jose Felix Zepeda, 41, is charged with felony special circumstances murder during the commission of a robbery, felony kidnapping and felony conspiracy to commit a crime. If convicted, he faces a maximum sentence of life in state prison without parole. Zepeda has pleaded not guilty to all charges. Prosecutors say that in April 2012, Zepeda supplied three pounds of methamphetamine to two men who were supposed to sell the drugs to a buyer.
NATIONAL
January 2, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
This just might be a case of life imitating art: On Thursday, Florida officials announced that they arrested a "Breaking Bad" contest winner on suspicion of helping run a nationwide drug ring out of his home. However, instead of making meth, like the chemistry teacher in the popular show, Ryan Lee Carroll and two other men converted their apartment's garage into an elaborate lab for making synthetic marijuana, likely for large-scale distribution, according to the Lee County Sheriff's Office.
NEWS
April 14, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Alzheimer’s research is continuing -- that’s one bright side we can take from the mixed Alzheimer’s news this week.   The positive news came when researchers announced they might be able to spot Alzheimer’s in the brain nearly a decade before the disease begins to show. In a new study led by Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, researchers used MRIs to assess the brains of two groups of people. Those with smaller Alzheimer’s-related areas were more likely to develop the disease 7 to 11 years down the road.
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