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SPORTS
December 26, 1987 | Associated Press
Nebraska football Coach Tom Osborne said Friday that none of his fourth-ranked Cornhuskers tested positive for drugs and all will be eligible to play in the Jan. 1 Fiesta Bowl against third-ranked Florida State. Osborne said "about 135 to 140 players" made the Christmas Day trip here--"just about everybody who practiced this season on the varsity level." Drug tests were taken on campus earlier this month, per National Collegiate Athletic Assn. mandate for bowl-bound teams.
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SPORTS
March 19, 2014 | By David Wharton
The past year has been rough for Jamaican track and field, which came under heavy scrutiny after a string of high-profile athletes failed drug tests around the time of the 2013 national championships. On Wednesday, the Jamaicans got some good news. The World Anti-Doping Agency announced that the island nation had corrected a number of significant flaws in its drug control program. "They've done exactly what we've asked them to do to put their program into place," David Howman, WADA's director general, told the Associated Press.
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SPORTS
August 13, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Apparently, no track and field athletes will be suspended from competing in the Olympic Games, even though between 6 and 10 failed drugs tests at the Olympic trials last month in Indianapolis. A spokesman for the U.S. Olympic Committee, Mike Moran, said Friday that all of the athletes involved tested positive for stimulants contained in over-the-counter cold medications or herbal teas and that hearings conducted so far have determined that the use was either pre-declared or inadvertent.
SPORTS
March 10, 2014 | By Houston Mitchell
Minnesota state representative Pat Garofalo has some questions to answer Monday after he sent out a tweet Sunday night that many people took as racist. The tweet:     Let's be honest, 70% of teams in NBA could fold tomorrow + nobody would notice a difference w/ possible exception of increase in streetcrime - Rep. Pat Garofalo (@PatGarofalo) March 9, 2014 Many people on Twitter perceived Garofalo's tweet as a shot at African Americans, since the majority of players in the NBA are black.
SPORTS
March 10, 2014 | By Houston Mitchell
Minnesota state representative Pat Garofalo has some questions to answer Monday after he sent out a tweet Sunday night that many people took as racist. The tweet:     Let's be honest, 70% of teams in NBA could fold tomorrow + nobody would notice a difference w/ possible exception of increase in streetcrime - Rep. Pat Garofalo (@PatGarofalo) March 9, 2014 Many people on Twitter perceived Garofalo's tweet as a shot at African Americans, since the majority of players in the NBA are black.
SPORTS
December 17, 1992 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Athletes and officials in the world of disabled sports have long campaigned for more respect and recognition. They point out that disabled athletes work as hard, devote as many hours to training and are in most ways the equal of their able-bodied counterparts. Events at this summer's Paralympic Games at Barcelona confirmed what officials have been saying. For the first time, disabled athletes tested positive for banned drugs at their most prestigious competition.
SPORTS
July 29, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Track and field's ruling body is ready to cut its penalty for drug use in half because of pressure from athletes and regional federations. A ruling on the proposal, supported by the European federation, will probably be made during a two-day meeting of the IAAF congress, starting Wednesday in Athens, Greece, where the World Track Championships begin Friday.
SPORTS
June 30, 1994 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although soccer has not been stung by doping controversies the way track and field and weightlifting have, the sport has modeled its drug-testing policy after the International Olympic Committee, one of the most strident anti-drug groups. Since 1986, FIFA, soccer's governing body, has adopted IOC guidelines except in the area of sanctioning. "In soccer, it's really rare to have drug problems," said Anthony Daley, chief medical officer for World Cup '94.
SPORTS
October 17, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barry McCaffrey, who announced Monday that he intends to step down Jan. 6 as the U.S. government's so-called drug czar, has used the post to press for curbs on the use of drugs in sports--particularly Olympic sports.
SPORTS
January 29, 2014 | By David Wharton
Ten days before opening ceremonies at the 2014 Sochi Olympics, the host country has suffered the embarrassment of having one or more of its athletes suspended for a failed drug test. The International Biathlon Union announced Wednesday three competitors from Russia and Lithuania were found to have an unnamed prohibited substance in their samples. "According to the WADA [World Anti-Doping Agency] code, the IBU therefore provisionally suspended the respective athletes from any IBU competitions until the decision of the anti-doping hearing panel is reached," the statement said.
SPORTS
January 14, 2014 | By Lance Pugmire
Georges St-Pierre said Tuesday the lack of stringent drug testing for mixed martial arts fighters contributed to his decision to take an indefinite leave as Ultimate Fighting Championship welterweight champion. In an interview with reporters in Montreal, St-Pierre in a story published by Canadian Press said the absence of a uniform drug-testing policy up to his satisfaction “bothered me greatly. It was one of the reasons I decided to step aside.” St-Pierre, who endured sometimes brutal punishment in November to successfully defend his welterweight belt against Johny Hendricks by split-decision in Las Vegas, originally wanted Hendricks to participate in drug testing overseen by the Las Vegas-based Voluntary Anti-Doping Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
The upcoming New Year's crackdown on drunken driving will include a new test for many people who are pulled over - an oral swab that checks for marijuana, cocaine and other drugs. The voluntary swabbing has been used just 50 times this year. But Los Angeles City Atty. Mike Feuer is pushing to use it at more checkpoints and jails as officials try to limit the number of drivers impaired by substances other than alcohol. “Traditionally, our office has focused on drunken driving cases,” Feuer said at a news conference Friday.
SPORTS
November 15, 2013 | By David Wharton
With less than three months to go before the 2014 Sochi Olympics, the principal drug-testing laboratory in Russia could lose its international accreditation. The World Anti-Doping Agency is investigating the Moscow facility -- which handled testing for the recent world track and field championships -- to be sure it is compliant with agency standards. Arne Ljungqvist, the medical commission chairman for the International Olympic Committee, told the Associated Press that he expects to receive the investigation's findings soon.
SPORTS
November 14, 2013 | Wire reports
Michael Phelps has rejoined the U.S. drug testing program, the strongest signal yet that he's planning a comeback for the Rio Olympics. Phelps told the Associated Press on Thursday that "nothing is set in stone" though clearly he has enjoyed getting back into shape - he's down about 15 pounds - and working out with his former team at the North Baltimore Aquatic Club. "If I decide to keep going and swim again, then I'll compete," Phelps told the AP in an exclusive telephone interview from Minneapolis, where he is attending an Arena Grand Prix meet this weekend.
SPORTS
September 20, 2013 | By David Wharton
International track-and-field officials announced Friday that seven athletes failed drug tests at last month's world championships in Moscow. The International Assn. of Athletics Federations said that it collected urine samples from 538 athletes during the competition and also conducted 1,919 blood tests. “I am delighted that with the assistance of our partners the IAAF has been able to carry out such a comprehensive anti-doping testing program in Moscow,” IAAF President Lamine Diack said.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | HELAINE OLEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
America's small businesses may be becoming the employer of last resort for the nation's drug users. The evidence so far is mostly anecdotal, but it appears to be growing every day, Labor Department and congressional officials say. The reason is simple: Larger firms are much more likely to screen job applicants routinely for drug use. By contrast, smaller companies don't have the money--or the time--to put anti-drug programs into effect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1990
"Police Union Fights Random Drug Testing" (Metro, Feb. 17) sets forth the purported position of the Los Angeles police union on drug testing of police officers. There are some issues in a democratic society that do not lend themselves to the democratic process of decision by majority vote. The safety of the citizens of Los Angeles is at issue here. The purported opposition to "modification of their four-year contract in the middle of the term" does not directly address the issue of drug testing of police officers.
SPORTS
July 15, 2013 | By Philip Hersh
Hey, pro cycling: Move over on that trash heap so there is some room for track and field. Almost exactly a decade after the BALCO scandal all but destroyed track's credibility, the sport is facing another legitimacy crisis. Sunday, leading U.S. sprinter Tyson Gay and Jamaica's Asafa Powell, Olympic gold medalist and former world-record holder in the 100 meters, confirmed they had tested positive for banned substances. There were news reports saying Powell was among five Olympic gold medalists from Jamaica who tested positive for stimulants at their national championships last month.
SPORTS
July 14, 2013 | By David Wharton
Just weeks before the world championships in Moscow, the sport of track and field has suffered a major blow with three marquee sprinters testing positive for banned substances. American 100-meter record holder Tyson Gay and Jamaica's Asafa Powell and Sherone Simpson all acknowledged Sunday they had failed drug tests. Gay, who owns the fastest 100-meter time in the world this season, plans to withdraw from the championships. That would deprive the meet of its most-anticipated event, a showdown with six-time Olympic champion Usain Bolt.
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