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Drugs Thailand

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BUSINESS
December 3, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a patient suffering from an ulcer shows up at his doctor's office in Thailand, chances are good that the physician, like doctors everywhere in the world, will prescribe the American drug Tagamet. But something unusual happens when the patient arrives at the drugstore to buy the drug: He is offered the choice of Tagamet, at up to $1.50 a tablet, or one of 40 to 50 different, locally produced "copycat drugs" bearing such names as Ulcermet and Simadine and costing a fraction of the original.
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BUSINESS
December 3, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a patient suffering from an ulcer shows up at his doctor's office in Thailand, chances are good that the physician, like doctors everywhere in the world, will prescribe the American drug Tagamet. But something unusual happens when the patient arrives at the drugstore to buy the drug: He is offered the choice of Tagamet, at up to $1.50 a tablet, or one of 40 to 50 different, locally produced "copycat drugs" bearing such names as Ulcermet and Simadine and costing a fraction of the original.
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NEWS
February 14, 1988
In what is believed to be the world's largest single heroin seizure, Thai authorities reported the interception of 1.4 tons of top-grade heroin bound for New York and worth more than $2 billion on the street. The 2,822 pounds of No. 4 grade heroin was hidden in bales of rubber sheets on a freighter at Klong Toey Port in Bangkok, the director general of customs said. No. 4 grade heroin is 97% pure.
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By just about any measure, Lavu Saiwang should have a bright future. His village in northwestern Thailand has recently received an abundance of development assistance which for the first time has brought a paved road, a school, a clinic and even electricity to the remote mountaintop. But at age 10, Lavu is instead the village's youngest heroin addict. Ju Saiwang, the village chief, said the boy has a lot of company.
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By just about any measure, Lavu Saiwang should have a bright future. His village in northwestern Thailand has recently received an abundance of development assistance which for the first time has brought a paved road, a school, a clinic and even electricity to the remote mountaintop. But at age 10, Lavu is instead the village's youngest heroin addict. Ju Saiwang, the village chief, said the boy has a lot of company.
TRAVEL
August 6, 1989 | LARRY HABEGGER and JAMES O'REILLY, Habegger and O'Reilly are free-lance writers living in Northern California .
World Travel Watch is a monthly report designed to help you make informed judgments about travel throughout the world. Because conditions can change overnight, always make your own inquiries before you leave home. In the United States contact the nearest passport agency office; abroad, check in with the nearest American embassy . Asia --China: Due to continuing unstable security conditions, travel here is not advised.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2007 | From the Associated Press
China, Russia and 10 other nations were targeted by the Bush administration Monday for failing to sufficiently protect U.S. producers of music, movies and other copyrighted material from widespread piracy. The Bush administration placed the 12 countries on a "priority watch list," which will subject them to extra scrutiny and could eventually lead to economic sanctions if the administration decides to bring trade cases before the World Trade Organization.
NATIONAL
August 20, 2009 | Tom Hamburger
In an unexpected spillover from the healthcare battle, activists in Washington, and Thailand and other developing countries are accusing the Obama administration of endangering access to affordable drugs to fight AIDS and other epidemic diseases. And they say the problem may lie in the administration's reluctance to confront the giant pharmaceutical companies at a time when the companies are crucial allies in President Obama's struggle to revamp the U.S. healthcare system. Organizations such as Doctors without Borders and OxFam International long accused U.S.-based pharmaceutical companies and the Bush administration of impeding their efforts to make generic drugs available to fight major diseases in poor countries.
NEWS
August 17, 2000 | MARIA ELENA FERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All of the roads in Chutima Vucharatavintara's life seem to have led her here, into the arms of a little boy with a broken spirit and diseased body who has never known a love like hers. They couldn't have met in a colder setting, this giving woman and this needy boy. Their eyes first locked in a stark Immigration and Naturalization Service office where the 3-year-old's fate had been debated by strangers for 14 days.
NEWS
February 14, 1988
In what is believed to be the world's largest single heroin seizure, Thai authorities reported the interception of 1.4 tons of top-grade heroin bound for New York and worth more than $2 billion on the street. The 2,822 pounds of No. 4 grade heroin was hidden in bales of rubber sheets on a freighter at Klong Toey Port in Bangkok, the director general of customs said. No. 4 grade heroin is 97% pure.
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