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Drugs

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2012 | Steve Lopez
Illegal drugs by the tons are smuggled into California each year by sea, by land and by air. Cocaine, marijuana, methamphetamine and heroin are either produced in or pass through Mexico, where 50,000 people have been killed in the last six years in an escalating war among cartels. Some of the victims have been beheaded, mutilated or left hanging from bridges, not necessarily because of their involvement in the trade, but as a diabolical demonstration that the drug lords will stop at nothing to dominate the market.
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HEALTH
September 13, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
Dozens of drugs can weaken bones. Oral corticosteroids such as prednisone are especially problematic when used for long periods of time. Even inhaled steroids (Advair, Flovent, Symbicort, etc.) may pose problems over time. People with osteoporosis should work closely with a doctor to develop a treatment strategy. I have taken prednisone for years due to an arthritic condition. Because of stomach upset, my doctor has prescribed Nexium to prevent an ulcer. I was recently diagnosed with osteoporosis and wonder what can be done to counteract the bone-damaging effects of my medicine.
SPORTS
January 17, 2013 | By Lance Pugmire
Lance Armstrong calmly told Oprah Winfrey in a highly anticipated taped television interview Thursday night that he took a variety of performance-enhancing drugs while winning a record seven Tour de France titles, but that in his mind at the time, he didn't consider it cheating. At the start of a stunning question-and-answer exchange, the disgraced rider responded to a series of yes-or-no questions, answering affirmatively when asked whether he had taken specific drugs during a period when he was one of the most celebrated athletes in the world.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Like a lot of people, Lesa has unused prescription drugs at her home. She's tried to donate them to doctors. She's tried to donate them to hospitals. To no avail. She wants to know: Is there any way to donate unused medicine and put it to good use? It would be nice if that were the case, but it's not. There's just too great a chance of mischief (or worse) resulting from drug donations. So the real question here is how people should dispose of unused medications. The Food and Drug Administration says it's OK to get rid of most medications in the garbage, but they advise mixing pills with kitty litter or some equally yucky commodity to deter thieves.
SCIENCE
May 6, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The Food and Drug Administration is warning physicians that women who suffer migraine headaches and are pregnant or may become pregnant should not use the drugs valproate or valproic acid to prevent the severe headaches, in light of new evidence showing those taking the drugs during pregnancy have children with lower IQ scores than women who do not take them. That warning represents a strengthening of a boxed warning that already appears on these prescription medications, which are used to control epileptic seizures, to treat bipolar disorder, and to prevent and relieve migraine headaches.
NEWS
April 14, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
CARTAGENA, Colombia -- President Obama said Saturday that he is open to a debate about current drug laws but that he believes legalizing narcotics could lead to even greater problems in those countries hardest hit by trafficking and violence. Obama told Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos on Saturday that he is willing to discuss whether current laws are "doing more harm than good. " But "legalization is not the answer," Obama said. As president of Colombia, which was ravaged for years by drug-related violence, Santos raised the question of legalization during this weekend's Summit of the Americas meeting here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2013 | By Lauren Williams
The driver in a  Memorial Day  car crash in Newport Beach that killed five Irvine teenagers did not have drugs or alcohol in his system, according to the Orange County coroner. Abdulrahman M. Alyahyan, 17, of Irvine, did not drink or use drugs in the hours before his 2008 Infiniti sedan slammed into a center divider on Jamboree Road, hit a tree and caught fire, according to a copy of the toxicology report reviewed Thursday. Results from the screenings were available for two of the car's four passengers as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2013 | By Scott Glover and Lisa Girion
A Southern California pain doctor who was featured in a 2012 Times investigative article on patient overdose deaths was arrested Tuesday on seven counts of illegally prescribing narcotics and other widely abused drugs. Dr. John Dimowo is charged with prescribing Vicodin, Norco, Adderall and Xanax to undercover agents who pretended to be patients but had no legitimate need for the drugs. Dimowo was not charged in connection with any patient deaths. The Times reported in November that five of Dimowo's patients fatally overdosed on medications he prescribed between 2009 and 2010, coroner's records show.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Mary MacVean, This post has been updated. See note below for details.
Exercise might work just as well or better than drugs for people with coronary heart disease or recovering from a stroke, according to a review of evidence published Wednesday. The scientists looked at the outcomes of 305 previous trials with 339,274 participants to try to determine whether physical activity was as effective as drugs at preventing death among people with four conditions: coronary heart disease, rehabilitation from stroke, treatment for heart failure and prevention of diabetes.
NATIONAL
October 10, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - Texas carried out yet another controversial execution Wednesday. Michael Yowell, 43, was put to death by lethal injection about 7 p.m. for killing his parents at their Lubbock home 15 years ago. The drug-fueled attack also left his 89-year-old grandmother dead. Yowell was the 14th inmate executed this year in Texas, the country's most active death penalty state, which has executed more than 500 prisoners . But Yowell did not die like the others. Last month, Texas officials were facing a shortage of the drug used in lethal injections, pentobarbital, after the manufacturer announced that the drug was unsafe for use in lethal injections and restricted its sale.
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