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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1997
Now I know why we can't win the war on drugs. Half of our elected officials are on the stuff and the other half makes excuses for them. PETER W. VASILION Palos Verdes Estates
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SCIENCE
April 23, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Two drugs given to people who suffer migraines reduced the frequency of their headaches in early trials, scientists said. The test results “may potentially represent a new era in preventive therapy for migraine,” Dr. Peter Goadsby, an author on studies of both drugs, said in a statement. One of the researchers called migraine headaches the third most common medical disorder in the world. Both drugs must undergo larger trials to confirm the results. Both drugs are intended to prevent rather than treat migraine headaches, and the studies of them are the first to test monoclonal antibodies for migraine prevention, the scientists said.
SPORTS
September 26, 2012 | By Jim Peltz
Former Cy Young Award-winning relief pitcher Eric Gagne reportedly alleges in a new book that 80% of his Dodgers teammates were using performance-enhancing drugs. The allegation, in which Gagne did not identify the other players, is contained in his upcoming autobiography "Game Over: The Story of Eric Gagne," according to ESPN. "I was intimately aware of the clubhouse in which I lived," Gagne, a Canadian, writes in the French-language book. "I would say that 80% of the Dodgers were consuming them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2009 | Harriet Ryan
The request for drugs for Anna Nicole Smith slid off the fax of a Valley Village pharmacy five days after the model's son had died in the Bahamas. A psychiatrist wanted 300 tablets of methadone, two types of sedatives, a muscle relaxer, an anti-inflammatory drug and four bottles of a painkiller nicknamed "hospital heroin," unsealed court records show. The amount and combination alarmed the pharmacist, who later recalled thinking, "They are going to kill her with this." He phoned Smith's internist and said he had no intention of filling a prescription that amounted to "pharmaceutical suicide," according to court documents.
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