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Dry Lake

NEWS
July 1, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Seeking to avoid a long legal battle, top Owens Valley and Los Angeles officials are recommending a deal that would postpone and reevaluate a controversial plan to force the city to mount a multimillion-dollar project to curb severe dust storms at Owens Lake.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1989 | MAUREEN FAN, Times Staff Writer
Jerry McKee gazes angrily at the water on Lake Morena. "I can stand at my window and watch the water level drop every day," McKee said from the lakeside site where he is building his new home. As people like McKee try to figure out a way to save Lake Morena in southeast San Diego County, the city's Department of Water Utilities is emptying it at a rate of 15 million gallons a day. After Superior Court Judge William C.
NEWS
October 11, 2000 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mostly because it made him feel better, Bryan Pappas used to chuckle that his adopted town of Hinkley, stranded in the desert on the rim of Harper Dry Lake, wasn't quite the end of the Earth. "But you could sure see it from there," he said. Suddenly, the view is more complex. To some, it is bright with the promise of space exploration--because NASA may base the next generation of spaceships here, bringing thousands of jobs and an economic spark.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 27-year-old Sherman Oaks actor was killed and another actor injured Friday on the set of the action-adventure TV series "Sliders," when a dune buggy they were riding in overturned on a dry lake bed near Adelanto, authorities said. Kenneth Keith Steadman, 27, was flown by helicopter from the set on El Mirage Dry Lake to San Bernardino County Medical Center after the 11:50 a.m. accident, said Randy Emon of the county coroner's office.
NEWS
July 16, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Culminating decades of bitter conflict, the Owens Valley and Los Angeles struck a historic deal Wednesday designed to bring an end to massive dust storms at Owens Lake by 2006. The battle over the dry lake is the last major hurdle to mending the environmental damage that Los Angeles inflicted when it opened its aqueduct 85 years ago and drained the Owens Valley of its mountain-fed water.
NEWS
October 14, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is where people from Los Angeles come to do what they can't in front of the neighbors. They blow things up. They shoot porno flicks. They drink beer at dawn. They rip up hills on motorbikes. They stage cockfights and rave parties and soar through the sky in homemade contraptions. And most notably, they drive worse than any road-raging commuter on the San Diego Freeway. "We had a vehicle hit a Porta Potti at 200 mph," said Barry Nelson, chief U.S. Bureau of Land Management ranger for 3.
TRAVEL
March 19, 2006 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
FOR some women it's morning sickness, but the hardest part of pregnancy for me was giving up motorcycles. I'd been riding almost daily for a dozen years, and I gave it up only to avoid disapproving stares at my bulging belly resting on the tank. So I parked my Ducati Monster and started driving a Dodge minivan. In the four years since, I've ridden my bike exactly twice, both times with extreme caution. I wasn't riding so much like a mother as a grandmother, barely leaning into the turns.
NEWS
July 3, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Reaching a historic decision that aims to force Los Angeles to surrender a large portion of its prized water, an Owens Valley pollution board Wednesday ordered the city to mount an unprecedented, multimillion-dollar project to curtail severe dust storms at Owens Lake.
NEWS
May 30, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the Baikal-Amur railroad that runs 3,000 miles through economically untapped wilderness, to the unnavigable White Sea Canal that cost as many as 100,000 lives in construction, the "hero projects" of the former Soviet Union stand as monuments to megalomania. The Russian landscape is blighted with failed feats of outsize engineering, most of which have ruined the environment, bankrupted the government and crushed individuality with their intimidating presence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan
Robert M. White was a 38-year-old U.S. Air Force major and record-setting test pilot at Edwards Air Force Base in 1962 when he joined the elite ranks of America's four astronauts. But Mercury astronauts Alan Shepard, Virgil Grissom, John Glenn and Scott Carpenter went into space seated atop ballistic missiles and returned in capsules that parachuted onto the ocean. White did it as the pilot of a rocket-powered X-15 research airplane, flying nearly 60 miles above the Earth's surface and completing a conventional landing on Rogers Dry Lake at Edwards Air Force Base.
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