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Dry White Season

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
"A Dry White Season," originally banned in South Africa as a biased and highly emotional threat to public order, opened uncut to a packed film festival house Thursday night, leaving many in its mostly white liberal audience troubled by the stark vision of police brutality and injustice in their homeland.
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OPINION
July 7, 2004
Re "A Hollywood Iconoclast Who Transformed the Art of Acting," July 3: Readers might be interested to know that Marlon Brando was a strong critic of U.S. foreign policy. After reading my March 3, 1999, Op-Ed article in The Times criticizing U.S. actions in Guatemala, Brando contacted me and initiated an hourlong discussion about the history of U.S. operations there. Outraged at U.S. military training and CIA manuals on killing in Central America, he wanted to understand how it was possible to turn normal American boys into killers and torturers abroad.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1989 | SHEILA BENSON
Do we have to endorse mediocre art in the service of good politics? The question arises in the wake of four showings of "A Dry White Season" at a Johannesberg film festival two weeks ago. That the film would be profoundly disturbing to Johannesberg's white audiences is hardly surprising.
FOOD
March 21, 1996
In regards to the letter asking about "safe" ways to make sorbet and chiffon pie without using raw egg whites (Letters; March 14)--there is a source for pasteurized dried egg whites. It is the King Arthur Flour Baker's Catalog. Also available are pasteurized meringue powder and dried pasteurized whole egg. By the way, quantities are geared to home, not commercial bakers, and prices are very reasonable. PATTI D. HALL, Seal Beach We received many answers to the egg white query and turned up many sources, in addition to the King Arthur catalog.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1989
Benson implies that most black South Africans would condemn the final scene in "A Dry White Season." That argument ignores both the mass support that black South Africans give the African National Congress, which pursues an armed struggle, and the tenets of liberation theology as developed in South Africa. Indeed, Lindiwe Mabuza, the representative of the African National Congress to the United States, attended the Los Angeles premiere of "A Dry White Season" and said the film was authentic, moving and important.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1989
. . . Batman is not the only masked man headed our way. New World TV plans to shoot a pilot for . . . "Zorro." . . . It's a long way from "The Last Picture Show": Timothy Bottoms has been cast in an episode of the syndicated "Freddy's Nightmares." . . . We're told that Marlon Brando--in the tradition of rotund Sidney Greenstreet and Orson Welles--truly fills the big screen in MGM/UA's upcoming "A Dry White Season."
OPINION
March 24, 1991
Judging from the transcripts of the computer messages released by the Police Department, including police officers referring to African-Americans as being right out of "Gorillas in the Mist," I'd say that there are officers in the LAPD who are right out of "A Dry White Season" or "Cry Freedom" (March 19). If Field Marshal Daryl Gates doesn't see fit to resign after this latest development, he is only showing his solidarity with a troubled and racist system. SHAUN MASON Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1989 | Shauna Snow, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The anti-apartheid film, "A Dry White Season," was shown five times in South Africa on Monday despite an earlier ban by censors. The film, based on South African writer Andre Brink's novel, stars Donald Sutherland as a white liberal who tries to discover the truth about the deaths of his gardener and gardener's son in police custody. It contains scenes of police opening fire on schoolchildren in the black township of Soweto in 1976 and security police torturing black prisoners.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
"A Dry White Season" (at the AMC Century 14) moves so swiftly, catching you up into its hellish chain of events, that you're left reeling. That's exactly the effect it should have, for no other contemporary mainstream film takes us so deeply, so unflinchingly, into the tragically divided heart of South Africa.
OPINION
July 7, 2004
Re "A Hollywood Iconoclast Who Transformed the Art of Acting," July 3: Readers might be interested to know that Marlon Brando was a strong critic of U.S. foreign policy. After reading my March 3, 1999, Op-Ed article in The Times criticizing U.S. actions in Guatemala, Brando contacted me and initiated an hourlong discussion about the history of U.S. operations there. Outraged at U.S. military training and CIA manuals on killing in Central America, he wanted to understand how it was possible to turn normal American boys into killers and torturers abroad.
OPINION
March 24, 1991
Judging from the transcripts of the computer messages released by the Police Department, including police officers referring to African-Americans as being right out of "Gorillas in the Mist," I'd say that there are officers in the LAPD who are right out of "A Dry White Season" or "Cry Freedom" (March 19). If Field Marshal Daryl Gates doesn't see fit to resign after this latest development, he is only showing his solidarity with a troubled and racist system. SHAUN MASON Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1989
Benson implies that most black South Africans would condemn the final scene in "A Dry White Season." That argument ignores both the mass support that black South Africans give the African National Congress, which pursues an armed struggle, and the tenets of liberation theology as developed in South Africa. Indeed, Lindiwe Mabuza, the representative of the African National Congress to the United States, attended the Los Angeles premiere of "A Dry White Season" and said the film was authentic, moving and important.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1989 | SHEILA BENSON
Do we have to endorse mediocre art in the service of good politics? The question arises in the wake of four showings of "A Dry White Season" at a Johannesberg film festival two weeks ago. That the film would be profoundly disturbing to Johannesberg's white audiences is hardly surprising.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
"A Dry White Season," originally banned in South Africa as a biased and highly emotional threat to public order, opened uncut to a packed film festival house Thursday night, leaving many in its mostly white liberal audience troubled by the stark vision of police brutality and injustice in their homeland.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
Euzhan Palcy may be a relative newcomer to Hollywood, a black woman in a clubby, white-controlled business, but already she knows how to get what she wants out of the studios--and when to make concessions to get it. The 32-year-old director originally hoped to make a film about South Africa from a black perspective, with victims of apartheid at the center of her story. "A Dry White Season," which opened here last week, is the compromise project she eventually settled on, without regret.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1989 | Shauna Snow, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The anti-apartheid film, "A Dry White Season," was shown five times in South Africa on Monday despite an earlier ban by censors. The film, based on South African writer Andre Brink's novel, stars Donald Sutherland as a white liberal who tries to discover the truth about the deaths of his gardener and gardener's son in police custody. It contains scenes of police opening fire on schoolchildren in the black township of Soweto in 1976 and security police torturing black prisoners.
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