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Dryden Flight Research Facility

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1998
A 206-foot-long unmanned flying wing driven by 14 electrically powered propellers climbed into the sky Thursday on a flight to test technology intended to allow it to climb to 100,000 feet on the sun's energy. The flight of the robotic Centurion, directed by a pilot on the ground, went very well, said Pete Jacobs, a spokesman for the builder, AeroVironment. It was in the air about two hours and climbed to an altitude of a few hundred feet.
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NEWS
September 29, 1992 | From Associated Press
An experimental aircraft known as the X-31 has flown maneuvers at a 70-degree angle of attack, a capability that would allow future fighter aircraft to turn more tightly and point at targets more quickly than today's fighters, the Pentagon announced Monday. The development is important because most aircraft operate beyond their aerodynamic lift limit at such extremely sharp angles. They spin or tumble out of control, often with catastrophic results. Other advanced U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1991
Paul F. Bikle, who was director of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility at Edwards Air Force Base for nearly 12 years, has died in Salinas, Calif. He was 75. A longtime resident of Lancaster, Bikle died Saturday of complications of a heart attack suffered last month, said Don Haley, a NASA spokesman. Bikle was born June 5, 1916, in Wilkinsburg, Pa., and was a graduate of the University of Detroit, where he majored in aeronautical engineering.
NEWS
January 24, 1991
Paul F. Bikle, the engineer who guided many of the nation's most advanced flight programs and whose avocations included setting world records in gliders, has died. Bikle, who oversaw NASA's X-15 program as director of the Dryden Flight Research Facility, was 75 when he died Saturday at a son's home in Salinas. He had been staying there after suffering a heart attack at his own home in Lancaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1993 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Jet Propulsion Laboratory will begin closing its 48-year-old Edwards Air Force Base test facility Oct. 1 and hopes to reduce the site's staff by more than half by year's end. Forty-five people, including JPL employees and contractors, work at the 570-acre facility. In the last three months of the year, the work force will be cut to 19 as part of the two-year closure process, said Philip Garrison, manager of JPL's propulsion and chemicals section.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1993 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Milt Thompson, a test pilot who flew the X-15, died Friday morning in Lancaster. He was 67. Thompson, one of just 12 pilots to fly the famed rocket-powered aircraft as well as other research planes in the late 1950s and 1960s, was chief engineer of NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility at Edwards Air Force Base, a position he held since 1975. Thompson's career with NASA began in 1956, when the agency was still known as the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
NEWS
October 9, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Having successfully launched a solar probe to carry out the most ambitious exploration of the sun ever attempted, the space shuttle Discovery is set to land Wednesday at Edwards Air Force Base at a most appropriate time: sunrise. Officials at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Dryden Flight Research Facility, located at Edwards, said the spaceplane is to land about 6:54 a.m., just as the sun rises at the sprawling Mojave Desert base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1993 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Their names do not come to mind when thinking of aviation's greatest, but their accomplishments rival those of even the most well-known fliers. And next month their aviation successes will be displayed for posterity on Lancaster's Aerospace Walk of Honor. Lancaster officials on Thursday announced the names of the five test pilots who will be honored at the fourth annual Aerospace Walk of Honor celebration--Milt Thompson, William Dana, Max R. Stanley, Col. Gerald (Jerry) Gentry and Col.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1993 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Col. Vladimir Kondratenko, commander of the Russian Test Pilot School, got to do something Thursday that would once have made him a hero of the Soviet Union--he climbed into a training version of the cockpit of an SR-71 Blackbird, for many years the U.S. Air Force's most secret spy plane.
NEWS
March 25, 1994 | David Wharton
Marta Bohn-Meyer, crew member on the SR-71 Blackbird at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility at Edwards Air Force Base - "What Every American Should Know About American History" by Alan Axelrod and Charles Phillips "My husband and I read it aloud as we drive to work. I was surprised at how much I had forgotten about American history. We're using this as a way to bring ourselves back up to speed." Dr. Christopher Jessen, orthopedic surgeon and medical director at St.
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