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OPINION
February 13, 2010
Anew diagnostic manual prepared by the American Psychiatric Assn. either trivializes serious conditions, needlessly encourages hurtful stereotypes or succumbs to political correctness, depending on whom you believe. Even experts will question one classification or another in the draft fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which is why it's been posted on the Internet for comments years before its expected publication in 2013. But the intention of the authors -- to define more precisely which conditions require psychotherapy and how they're related to one another -- is laudable.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
May 20, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Finally . After many contentious years, the American Psychiatric Assn. has unleashed DSM-5, the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. If you know one thing about the DSM, it's probably that this book is considered “the bible of psychiatry.” According to the APA, it “contains a listing of diagnostic criteria for every psychiatric disorder recognized by the U.S. health care system.” Psychiatrists rely on it, as do other doctors, psychologists, nurses, social workers, folks at insurance companies who figure out which conditions are covered, and many others.
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OPINION
March 1, 2010 | By Allen Frances
As chairman of the task force that created the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), which came out in 1994, I learned from painful experience how small changes in the definition of mental disorders can create huge, unintended consequences. Our panel tried hard to be conservative and careful but inadvertently contributed to three false "epidemics" -- attention deficit disorder, autism and childhood bipolar disorder. Clearly, our net was cast too wide and captured many "patients" who might have been far better off never entering the mental health system.
NEWS
December 9, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
That big fat bible of psychiatric diagnosis - the DSM - is one step closer to its overhaul, a task that has taken more than a decade. On Dec. 1, the board of trustees of the American Psychiatric Assn. voted to approve the fifth edition of the book, which psychiatrists use to diagnose patients. The final edition is due out in May. Among the changes: Asperger's disorder will no longer be classed as a separate condition but will be folded into an umbrella category called autism spectrum disorder.
OPINION
November 23, 2008
Re "Wrangling over psychiatry's bible," Opinion, Nov. 16 Christopher Lane's Op-Ed article alleges a lack of transparency in the development of the next Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, known as the DSM. The DSM is recognized worldwide as the source of definitive criteria for mental illnesses. The process for the development of the fifth edition of the DSM began in 1999 and will conclude with publication in 2012. Hundreds of international experts, vetted for conflicts of interest, are involved in researching the scientific literature, discussing all options, assuring that attention is paid to gender, ethnicity, age and other factors and, eventually, testing hypotheses in the field.
OPINION
January 5, 2009
Re "Psychiatry manual's secrecy criticized," Dec. 29 Your story notes: "As the field has changed, the number of disorders in the DSM has tripled to 300, an increase paralleled by the rise in sales of drugs that pharmaceutical companies and psychiatrists tout as remedies for emotional suffering. Some critics suspect a quest for profits may have encouraged the field to create mental illnesses out of personality quirks." Readers might infer that this expansion was the result of adding disorders to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders that lack a known cause or are related to those disorders for which there is a new medication.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Jon Ronson is fascinated by people who are bonkers. And insane people who appear to be normal, and ostensibly sane people doing crazy things. The British journalist's book "The Men Who Stare at Goats" — about a secret U.S. military wing that hoped to use mind power to walk through walls, become invisible and perform psychic executions — was the basis for the 2009 film of the same title. Now, Ronson's paddling around the swampy parts of sanity again in "The Psychopath Test," a book that manages to be as cheerily kooky as it is well-researched.
SCIENCE
March 1, 2010 | By Shari Roan
Tiger Woods, who recently admitted to multiple extramarital affairs, said he is receiving treatment. David Duchovny, who plays a sex-obsessed professor on the TV show "Californication," underwent rehab in 2008. Dr. Drew Pinsky has launched a reality series dealing with the subject. Sex addiction talk seems to be everywhere. But mental health experts are split on what underlies such behavior. The American Psychiatric Assn. has proposed that out-of-control sexual appetites be included as a diagnosis in the next edition of the psychiatrists' bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, to be published in 2013.
SCIENCE
February 10, 2010
The DSM story DSM-I Published in 1952 Directed by William C. Menninger, a psychiatrist and brigadier general. The focus was on treatment of soldiers. Listed 106 disorders. DSM-II 1968 Listed 182 disorders. Many conditions were seen as abnormal reactions to life situations. A revision, in 1974, dropped homosexuality as a disorder. DSM-III 1980 Terms were made consistent with disorders classified by the World Health Organization.
NEWS
December 9, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
That big fat bible of psychiatric diagnosis - the DSM - is one step closer to its overhaul, a task that has taken more than a decade. On Dec. 1, the board of trustees of the American Psychiatric Assn. voted to approve the fifth edition of the book, which psychiatrists use to diagnose patients. The final edition is due out in May. Among the changes: Asperger's disorder will no longer be classed as a separate condition but will be folded into an umbrella category called autism spectrum disorder.
HEALTH
May 23, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Tiger Woods' mistresses. Arnold Schwarzenegger's secret child. Bill Clinton's sexual escapades in the Oval Office. Every case of a prominent man risking his family, career and status for extramarital sex raises the question: What were they thinking? Mental health experts wonder this too, and not just because of the cases that make headlines. Each year, thousands of men and women from all walks of life seek psychiatric help for sexual conduct disorders, said doctors gathered here last week at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Assn.
HEALTH
May 22, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
"Where are we going to put the narcissists?" It was a question asked urgently by one of the hundreds of psychiatrists gathered here last week for their professional society's annual meeting. With doctors in the thick of a years-long effort to rewrite the essential textbook for diagnosing mental illnesses, questions like these came up time and again in meeting rooms, over drinks sipped from coconut shells, and in other venues during the five-day conference. Among the myriad proposals now on the table: reducing the number of specific personality disorders from 10 to five, a move that would eliminate the diagnosis of narcissistic disorder.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Jon Ronson is fascinated by people who are bonkers. And insane people who appear to be normal, and ostensibly sane people doing crazy things. The British journalist's book "The Men Who Stare at Goats" — about a secret U.S. military wing that hoped to use mind power to walk through walls, become invisible and perform psychic executions — was the basis for the 2009 film of the same title. Now, Ronson's paddling around the swampy parts of sanity again in "The Psychopath Test," a book that manages to be as cheerily kooky as it is well-researched.
SCIENCE
March 1, 2010 | By Shari Roan
Tiger Woods, who recently admitted to multiple extramarital affairs, said he is receiving treatment. David Duchovny, who plays a sex-obsessed professor on the TV show "Californication," underwent rehab in 2008. Dr. Drew Pinsky has launched a reality series dealing with the subject. Sex addiction talk seems to be everywhere. But mental health experts are split on what underlies such behavior. The American Psychiatric Assn. has proposed that out-of-control sexual appetites be included as a diagnosis in the next edition of the psychiatrists' bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, to be published in 2013.
OPINION
March 1, 2010 | By Allen Frances
As chairman of the task force that created the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), which came out in 1994, I learned from painful experience how small changes in the definition of mental disorders can create huge, unintended consequences. Our panel tried hard to be conservative and careful but inadvertently contributed to three false "epidemics" -- attention deficit disorder, autism and childhood bipolar disorder. Clearly, our net was cast too wide and captured many "patients" who might have been far better off never entering the mental health system.
OPINION
February 13, 2010
Anew diagnostic manual prepared by the American Psychiatric Assn. either trivializes serious conditions, needlessly encourages hurtful stereotypes or succumbs to political correctness, depending on whom you believe. Even experts will question one classification or another in the draft fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which is why it's been posted on the Internet for comments years before its expected publication in 2013. But the intention of the authors -- to define more precisely which conditions require psychotherapy and how they're related to one another -- is laudable.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2002 | Associated Press
Swiss drug giant Roche said it has reached agreement to sell its vitamin division for $2.21 billion to DSM, the Dutch chemical and life sciences company. Roche said the move would allow it to focus on its priority areas of pharmaceuticals and diagnostics. The deal is expected to close early next year.
SCIENCE
May 20, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Finally . After many contentious years, the American Psychiatric Assn. has unleashed DSM-5, the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. If you know one thing about the DSM, it's probably that this book is considered “the bible of psychiatry.” According to the APA, it “contains a listing of diagnostic criteria for every psychiatric disorder recognized by the U.S. health care system.” Psychiatrists rely on it, as do other doctors, psychologists, nurses, social workers, folks at insurance companies who figure out which conditions are covered, and many others.
SCIENCE
February 10, 2010
The DSM story DSM-I Published in 1952 Directed by William C. Menninger, a psychiatrist and brigadier general. The focus was on treatment of soldiers. Listed 106 disorders. DSM-II 1968 Listed 182 disorders. Many conditions were seen as abnormal reactions to life situations. A revision, in 1974, dropped homosexuality as a disorder. DSM-III 1980 Terms were made consistent with disorders classified by the World Health Organization.
SCIENCE
May 26, 2009 | Shari Roan
Is the compulsion to hoard things a mental disorder? How about the practice of eating excessively at night? And what of Internet addiction: Should it be diagnosed and treated? As the clock ticks toward the release of the most influential of mental health textbooks, psychiatrists are asking themselves thousands of complex and sometimes controversial questions. The answers will determine how Americans' mental health is assessed, diagnosed and treated.
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