Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsDumps Riverside County
IN THE NEWS

Dumps Riverside County

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many urban Southern California residents, the Eagle Mountain waste-by-rail plan makes sense: Reduce the need for local landfills by shipping 25% of the region's trash on trains and trucks to an abandoned open pit almost 200 miles east of Los Angeles. But to many desert farmers and affluent Palm Springs-area residents, it is a proposal from hell.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY
On the eve of possible Los Angeles City Council action on expanding Sunshine Canyon Landfill, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday voted to study instead hauling trash to desert dumps. Supervisor Mike Antonovich wrote the motion, which supports the County Sanitation Districts' plan to haul trash by rail to either Eagle Mountain in Riverside County or Mesquite Landfill in Imperial County. Antonovich said either would be an alternative to dumping trash at Sunshine Canyon.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 6, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
A Department of Interior administrative judge has halted a land swap by the Bureau of Land Management that is necessary for the development of a huge garbage dump east of Palm Springs that would serve much of Southern California for 100 years. Judge David L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1998 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing environmental grounds, a judge issued a tentative ruling Wednesday rejecting a proposal to build one of the world's largest garbage dumps next to Joshua Tree National Park in eastern Riverside County. San Diego County Superior Court Judge Judith McConnell said the plan presents an unacceptable level of threat to the desert tortoise, to the desert floor and to the "wilderness experience" at the sprawling park.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to ship 25% of Southern California's trash by train to a new desert landfill in Riverside County could have a significant impact on air quality at nearby Joshua Tree National Monument, according to a draft environmental impact statement released Monday. "Increases of nitrogen oxides . . . may worsen ozone concentrations within Joshua Tree," states the report, citing concerns of the National Park Service. " . . .
NEWS
July 6, 1990 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Swayed by emotional pleas from San Diego County residents and hints of lead poisoning in Riverside County, an initially skeptical Senate committee Thursday approved a bill that would force California Indian tribes to comply with state environmental rules when building garbage dumps on their sovereign lands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1998 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing environmental grounds, a judge issued a tentative ruling Wednesday rejecting a proposal to build one of the world's largest garbage dumps next to Joshua Tree National Park in eastern Riverside County. San Diego County Superior Court Judge Judith McConnell said the plan presents an unacceptable level of threat to the desert tortoise, to the desert floor and to the "wilderness experience" at the sprawling park.
NEWS
November 28, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A plan to turn the former Eagle Mountain iron mine into a giant desert landfill has run into trouble with the state Integrated Waste Management Board. And in the process, the board has sent a message to developers that the California Environmental Protection Agency intends to streamline and put new teeth into its permit process. This week, the waste management board, a division of Cal/EPA, rejected an environmental impact statement prepared by Mine Reclamation Corp.
NEWS
October 7, 1992 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The Riverside County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved plans to build what could become the nation's largest garbage dump, near the border of a national monument. Voting 3 to 2, the supervisors cleared the way for the project's sponsors to seek landfill permits from state water and air quality agencies to construct a landfill located about a mile and a half from scenic Joshua Tree National Monument.
NEWS
September 1, 1996 | DIANA MARCUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They are the scrappiest of farmers, eking out a living in the barren desert just south of Joshua Tree National Park. Sometimes they work in the buff, their skin protected by oil from their crop of certified organic jojoba. But don't count Larry and Donna Charpied as just hippie holdouts producing shampoo ingredients.
NEWS
August 27, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD and TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A plan to build one of the world's largest garbage dumps next to a national park cleared a major hurdle Tuesday when the Riverside County Board of Supervisors approved putting the Eagle Mountain Landfill in an abandoned iron ore mine beside Joshua Tree National Park. The dump would be a destination for up to 10,000 tons of Southern California trash every day for at least half a century, although the daily tonnage could double after seven years.
NEWS
September 1, 1996 | DIANA MARCUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They are the scrappiest of farmers, eking out a living in the barren desert just south of Joshua Tree National Park. Sometimes they work in the buff, their skin protected by oil from their crop of certified organic jojoba. But don't count Larry and Donna Charpied as just hippie holdouts producing shampoo ingredients.
NEWS
July 27, 1994 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to construct the world's largest garbage dump--known as Eagle Mountain, and big enough to handle Southern California's trash for 115 years--were derailed Tuesday by a judge's ruling that the project's environmental impact review contains serious flaws.
NEWS
January 6, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
A Department of Interior administrative judge has halted a land swap by the Bureau of Land Management that is necessary for the development of a huge garbage dump east of Palm Springs that would serve much of Southern California for 100 years. Judge David L.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to derail plans for the world's largest garbage dump, opponents of the proposed Eagle Mountain Landfill on Thursday sued the Riverside County Board of Supervisors, alleging that their 3-2 approval of the project last month was based on a flawed environmental impact report.
NEWS
November 28, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A plan to turn the former Eagle Mountain iron mine into a giant desert landfill has run into trouble with the state Integrated Waste Management Board. And in the process, the board has sent a message to developers that the California Environmental Protection Agency intends to streamline and put new teeth into its permit process. This week, the waste management board, a division of Cal/EPA, rejected an environmental impact statement prepared by Mine Reclamation Corp.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to derail plans for the world's largest garbage dump, opponents of the proposed Eagle Mountain Landfill on Thursday sued the Riverside County Board of Supervisors, alleging that their 3-2 approval of the project last month was based on a flawed environmental impact report.
NEWS
July 27, 1994 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to construct the world's largest garbage dump--known as Eagle Mountain, and big enough to handle Southern California's trash for 115 years--were derailed Tuesday by a judge's ruling that the project's environmental impact review contains serious flaws.
NEWS
October 7, 1992 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The Riverside County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved plans to build what could become the nation's largest garbage dump, near the border of a national monument. Voting 3 to 2, the supervisors cleared the way for the project's sponsors to seek landfill permits from state water and air quality agencies to construct a landfill located about a mile and a half from scenic Joshua Tree National Monument.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many urban Southern California residents, the Eagle Mountain waste-by-rail plan makes sense: Reduce the need for local landfills by shipping 25% of the region's trash on trains and trucks to an abandoned open pit almost 200 miles east of Los Angeles. But to many desert farmers and affluent Palm Springs-area residents, it is a proposal from hell.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|