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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Starting Jan. 1, the city will begin cleaning up a piece of public land that has served as a de facto dump for years, with the hope of turning it into a prime public recreation area. Once slated to be a municipal landfill, Oregon Gulch is filled with used tires, household garbage and unwanted appliances. The gulch is a popular spot for dirt biking, which has eroded the hillsides and caused silt to slide into the Sacramento River.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2004 | Karima A. Haynes, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Board of Public Works on Wednesday approved a landfill operator's request to cut down 940 mature oak trees to make room to expand the Sunshine Canyon Landfill in Granada Hills. The approval was one of the last hurdles to develop a 450-acre landfill operated by Browning-Ferris Industries within Los Angeles city limits. The existing landfill occupies 1,100 acres in unincorporated territory in the north San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2002 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
For at least a decade, California has allowed mildly radioactive waste from old nuclear sites to go to recycling plants and city dumps not licensed to handle radioactive material of any type. Yet neither landfill owners nor their employees, nearby residents nor elected officials, were ever notified of the state's policy, details of which are only now becoming public after a lawsuit and questions from concerned state lawmakers.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Southern California landfill business once turned garbage into gold. Now the industry has lost some of its luster. The weak economy, increased regulation and recycling and the onset of landfill alternatives--such as hauling garbage out to the hinterlands--are working to trim once-fat profit margins for the capital-intensive business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1987 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles has quietly stopped pumping mountains of sewage sludge into Santa Monica Bay, at least temporarily shedding its dubious distinction as the only West Coast city to still dump sludge in the Pacific.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2007 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
The Energy Department's controversial plan to build a nuclear waste dump in Nevada was trumped by Western water law Tuesday, when a federal judge rejected the agency's demand for 8 million gallons of water that state officials have refused to release. Energy officials said they needed the water to drill test holes at Yucca Mountain, the site about 90 miles north of Las Vegas where the government wants to store about 70,000 metric tons of high-level nuclear waste from across the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1995 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine the equivalent of 3 1/2 Statues of Liberty jutting out of a national forest. Or 1 1/2 Washington Monuments towering above a natural ridgeline. All made of trash. Using imagery everybody was sure to understand, opponents of the proposed Elsmere Canyon landfill pushed their case before a congressional subcommittee Tuesday, advocating federal legislation that would prevent any landfill from ever encroaching on Angeles National Forest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1993 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A fair held over the weekend to raise funds to fight the proposed Elsmere Canyon landfill netted more than $45,000, fair organizers said Monday. Organizers estimate 10,000 to 15,000 residents attended the Santa Clarita Valley Country Faire & Auction, which included Western dancing, pony rides, a dunking booth with city officials for targets, an air-conditioned bingo parlor and an auction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2004 | Karima A. Haynes, Times Staff Writer
The state Water Resources Control Board has rejected a request by Sunshine Canyon landfill operators to remove two provisions in its permit to expand the dump into Granada Hills, officials said Friday. Browning-Ferris Inc. executives objected to a requirement to install a double-liner system -- consisting of two 60-millimeter high-density polyethylene sheets, and two 2-foot layers of clay -- to prevent contaminants from seeping into groundwater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City officials are adding oak trees to their argumentative fire against a landfill proposed in Elsmere Canyon. The Torrance-based BKK Corp. has requested a permit from Los Angeles County to remove up to 3,056 oak trees from the canyon, located southeast of Santa Clarita off the Antelope Valley Freeway. Officials in this 6-year-old city, whose first adopted ordinance was to protect oaks, have added it to their long list of complaints against the suggested dump.
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