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SPORTS
August 22, 1989 | DAVID LAMB, Times Staff Writer
The rain had fallen heavily most of the day, but by 6:30 p.m.--an hour before game time--a large crowd had formed outside Durham Athletic Park, and a gray-haired woman shook the padlocked gate and called out good-naturedly, "Come on, Miles. Open up. It's time to play ball." Miles Wolff, owner of America's most famous minor league baseball team, stood on the other side of the fence, near the souvenir stand, and watched as an attendant unlocked the gate to a chorus of cheers.
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NATIONAL
May 27, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Three large crosses were burned in separate spots around Durham during a span of about an hour, and yellow fliers with Ku Klux Klan sayings were found at one location, police said. "At this day and time, I thought we'd be beyond that," said Mayor Bill Bell. "People do things for different reasons, and I don't have the slightest idea why anyone would do this." The first burning was reported outside St. Luke's Episcopal Church.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY
One of the most significant changes the American Dance Festival encountered when it moved in 1978 from Connecticut College in New London, Conn., to Duke University in Durham, N.C., is that it became part of a city that is 40% African-American.
MAGAZINE
June 2, 1991 | Mark Stuart Gill, Mark Stuart Gill is a journalist and screenwriter in Los Angeles.
THERE ARE ONLY A FEW PLACES LEFT IN this country where our culture cracks wide open and you can get a pure, distinctly American experience. The Washington Monument comes to mind; so does Ellis Island in New York Harbor. These places reverberate with a living national mythology. This is the way Sandy Katz felt when she came to Fat City.
MAGAZINE
June 2, 1991 | Mark Stuart Gill, Mark Stuart Gill is a journalist and screenwriter in Los Angeles.
THERE ARE ONLY A FEW PLACES LEFT IN this country where our culture cracks wide open and you can get a pure, distinctly American experience. The Washington Monument comes to mind; so does Ellis Island in New York Harbor. These places reverberate with a living national mythology. This is the way Sandy Katz felt when she came to Fat City.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY
When American Dance Festival executive director Charles Reinhart called Twyla Tharp to inform her that she had been selected for this year's $25,000 Samuel H. Scripps/ American Dance Festival Award for lifetime achievement, she replied: "Can't you just send me the check? Do I have to come down?" The response can be attributed in part to Tharp's cheeky nature, but it also spotlights the off-the-beaten-track location of this major festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1989
If director Roland Joffe wants to know why "Fat Man and Little Boy" isn't drawing audiences, he need only look as far as his trailer (Outtakes, Nov. 12). Instead of a sober profile of the men behind the Atomic Age, the movie is presented in the trailer as a pious, bombastic, partisan star vehicle for Paul Newman's favorite pinup boy, Paul Newman. Newman is miscast, like having Tom Cruise as Westmoreland, or Dan Quayle as President. WILLIAM J. BECKER JR.
NATIONAL
May 27, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Three large crosses were burned in separate spots around Durham during a span of about an hour, and yellow fliers with Ku Klux Klan sayings were found at one location, police said. "At this day and time, I thought we'd be beyond that," said Mayor Bill Bell. "People do things for different reasons, and I don't have the slightest idea why anyone would do this." The first burning was reported outside St. Luke's Episcopal Church.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To travel 2,500 miles to dance in weather hotter and more humid than Orange County has seen lately might seem incongruous. But six people--four college students, one professional dancer and a respected choreographer now teaching at UC Irvine--made the trip to the American Dance Festival here at Duke University.
SPORTS
July 24, 1988 | MARK I. PINSKY,, Times Staff Writer
The real star of "Bull Durham," this summer's hit movie about a hapless minor league baseball club, is not Kevin Costner or Susan Sarandon. It's a 50-year-old, 5,000-seat, downtown ballpark--with green grass and no dome--that almost died of decrepitude and neglect. And although critics have dubbed the movie a "sex comedy," the real story here is a romance between a team and a town. "This is a special town," says the Bulls' owner, Miles Wolff, with a special stadium.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To travel 2,500 miles to dance in weather hotter and more humid than Orange County has seen lately might seem incongruous. But six people--four college students, one professional dancer and a respected choreographer now teaching at UC Irvine--made the trip to the American Dance Festival here at Duke University.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY
One of the most significant changes the American Dance Festival encountered when it moved in 1978 from Connecticut College in New London, Conn., to Duke University in Durham, N.C., is that it became part of a city that is 40% African-American.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY
When American Dance Festival executive director Charles Reinhart called Twyla Tharp to inform her that she had been selected for this year's $25,000 Samuel H. Scripps/ American Dance Festival Award for lifetime achievement, she replied: "Can't you just send me the check? Do I have to come down?" The response can be attributed in part to Tharp's cheeky nature, but it also spotlights the off-the-beaten-track location of this major festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY
Long identified with tobacco and--since the movie "Bull Durham"--with minor league baseball, this city is moving to become a major jazz mecca with the drive to build the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz, affiliated with Duke University. "We've become one of the more talked-about places in jazz," said Paul H. Jeffrey, a saxophonist and longtime Monk associate now teaching at Duke.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1989
If director Roland Joffe wants to know why "Fat Man and Little Boy" isn't drawing audiences, he need only look as far as his trailer (Outtakes, Nov. 12). Instead of a sober profile of the men behind the Atomic Age, the movie is presented in the trailer as a pious, bombastic, partisan star vehicle for Paul Newman's favorite pinup boy, Paul Newman. Newman is miscast, like having Tom Cruise as Westmoreland, or Dan Quayle as President. WILLIAM J. BECKER JR.
SPORTS
August 22, 1989 | DAVID LAMB, Times Staff Writer
The rain had fallen heavily most of the day, but by 6:30 p.m.--an hour before game time--a large crowd had formed outside Durham Athletic Park, and a gray-haired woman shook the padlocked gate and called out good-naturedly, "Come on, Miles. Open up. It's time to play ball." Miles Wolff, owner of America's most famous minor league baseball team, stood on the other side of the fence, near the souvenir stand, and watched as an attendant unlocked the gate to a chorus of cheers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY
Long identified with tobacco and--since the movie "Bull Durham"--with minor league baseball, this city is moving to become a major jazz mecca with the drive to build the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz, affiliated with Duke University. "We've become one of the more talked-about places in jazz," said Paul H. Jeffrey, a saxophonist and longtime Monk associate now teaching at Duke.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1986 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Licorice Pizza, a Southern California record and video store chain that got its name from a 1960s record album, is being sold to the Musicland Group, the nation's largest specialty retailer of records and tapes. Musicland, a unit of American Can, said Tuesday that it agreed to buy the Licorice Pizza outlets and 26 other record stores for $13 million. The purchase of the 34 Licorice Pizza stores gives American Can's Musicland Group an entre into the lucrative Southland home video rental market.
SPORTS
July 24, 1988 | MARK I. PINSKY,, Times Staff Writer
The real star of "Bull Durham," this summer's hit movie about a hapless minor league baseball club, is not Kevin Costner or Susan Sarandon. It's a 50-year-old, 5,000-seat, downtown ballpark--with green grass and no dome--that almost died of decrepitude and neglect. And although critics have dubbed the movie a "sex comedy," the real story here is a romance between a team and a town. "This is a special town," says the Bulls' owner, Miles Wolff, with a special stadium.
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