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Dustin Hoffman

ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2003 | Bettijane Levine, Times Staff Writer
Dustin Hoffman was hot. The iconic actor wowed the crowd in the packed courtyard of Dutton's Brentwood Bookstore late Saturday afternoon, as he added yet another notch to his career: It was the first time he'd ever done a bookstore reading and signed books for a throng of literary fans. Of course, the fans were mostly too young to read and had never heard of Hoffman, let alone "The Graduate," "Midnight Cowboy" or "Rain Man."
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1999 | DONALD LIEBENSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not just vintage films that home video rescues from obscurity. Twentieth Century Fox Home Video has just released for the first time on videocassette "Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me?," the 1971 surreal comedy directed by Ulu Grosbard, written by Herb Gardner and starring Dustin Hoffman and, in an Oscar-nominated performance, Barbara Harris.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top movie stars typically refuse to appear in commercial advertisements because the Hollywood community might view it as a sign that their careers are on the skids, an expert witness testified Wednesday in Dustin Hoffman's federal lawsuit against Los Angeles magazine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal appeals court in San Francisco on Friday overturned a judge's $3-million verdict that Los Angeles magazine violated actor Dustin Hoffman's rights by publishing, without his consent, a computer-altered photo of him in a woman's evening gown and high heels. In ruling 3-0 for the magazine, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals made two key findings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge Thursday doubled to $3 million the damages that Los Angeles Magazine must pay Dustin Hoffman for publishing an unauthorized computer-altered photo of him in a fashion spread. The Academy Award-winning actor, who sued the magazine for misappropriating his image, won $1.5 million in compensatory damages last week in a nonjury federal court trial. On Thursday, U.S. District Judge Dickran Tevrizian Jr. tacked on another $1.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
When it came to reading a book out loud, Dustin Hoffman was a bit rusty. The last time he had done something similar was in New York City in the late 1960s, right after filming "The Graduate. " A local radio station had recruited 30 or so people, including Hoffman, to read "War and Peace" on air, around the clock, until it was done. "That was the only other time I had done something like that, and it was wonderful," recalls Hoffman, explaining why he recently agreed to perform the novel "Being There" by Jerzy Kosinski, a Polish writer and an old, now-deceased friend, for Audible.com, as part of the audiobook company's new "A-List Collection," which was launched Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Robert Redford never planned to play Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward in "All the President's Men," the Oscar-winning 1976 adaptation of Woodward and Carl Bernstein's account of their investigation of the 1972 Watergate break-in and the cloak-and-dagger cover-up by the Richard Nixon White House. Redford didn't even want the movie to be in color. "I originally wanted to make a black-and-white, small film with two unknowns," said Redford, who also served as producer on the film, which was directed by Alan J. Pakula and costarred Dustin Hoffman, Jason Robards, Jack Warden, Martin Balsam and Hal Holbrook.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2003 | John Clark, Special to The Times
Dustin Hoffman tells a story that illustrates how seriously he takes his work. Joe Pesci, he says, wanted to play Jake La Motta's brother in "Raging Bull." When director Martin Scorsese refused to consider him, Pesci tracked down the director at a hotel and threatened to throw himself out the window if he didn't get the part. He got the part. "That," says Hoffman, "is the ultimate actor's story."
NEWS
April 17, 1995 | LEILA COBO-HANLON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guests, flowers, champagne, band. One smiling clergyman and one nervous groom. After months of preparation, the stage is set and the cast is ready. But instead of "Here Comes the Bride," the leading lady has opted for "Let's Call the Whole Thing Off." Jilted at the altar. This is the stuff legends--and nightmares--are made of.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1998 | Amy Wallace, Amy Wallace is a Times staff writer
When Robert Evans thinks about his life--its dizzy highs and devastating lows--the 67-year-old movie producer is confident of one thing: The saga has all the makings of a great motion picture. Evans does more than muse about this. In the private editing room of his lavish Beverly Hills estate, he has spliced actual television sound bites into a montage that he thinks is the perfect opening sequence for a film about himself.
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