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OPINION
April 10, 1994
News item: Utility head takes demotion to retire with larger bonus (March 11). Now I know what DWP stands for: Depart With Payola. IRA NICKERSON Studio City
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By David Zahniser and James Rainey
Three months after it painted L.A. as a metropolis stumbling into decline, the Los Angeles 2020 Commission offered 13 recommendations Wednesday that it said would attract jobs and "put the city on a path to fiscal stability. " The group of prominent business, labor and civic leaders called on elected officials to enact a wide-ranging series of policy initiatives: increasing the minimum wage, combining giant twin harbors into a single port, altering oversight of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and bolstering efforts to promote regional tourism.
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BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Shan Li
Asa Lantz never thought going green would involve so much red tape. The 48-year-old wanted to slash her utility bill and help the environment by putting solar panels on the roof of her one-story Van Nuys home. The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power promised her system would be hooked up within three months after it was approved in September. She's still waiting. Lantz is one of many Angelenos who complain of excessive delays and bureaucratic run-arounds when trying to get solar panels hooked to the electric grid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Jack Dolan
A Los Angeles County judge signaled Tuesday that Department of Water and Power union chief Brian D'Arcy will have to turn over records showing how two nonprofit trusts he co-directs used $40 million in ratepayer money. D'Arcy has been locked in a political and legal struggle over control of the financial information since September, following a Times report that managers at the utility had only scant information on how the money was spent. In January, City Controller Ron Galperin issued a subpoena to D'Arcy and the nonprofits demanding that they turn over internal ledgers and bank records covering the last five years.
OPINION
January 18, 2013
Re "DWP will buy excess solar energy," Jan. 12 Well it's about time. But why should the L.A. Department of Water and Power limit the amount of solar energy it will buy from customers through 2016 to 100 megawatts? Why not buy all the solar power available? Why can't residential customers sell all the power they generate? Residential customers' meters should simply run backward when they generate more power than they are using, essentially selling it back at the same rate they pay. We would end up with a broad-based system less reliant on large, centralized facilities with all the large liabilities (think San Onofre)
OPINION
February 15, 2014
Re "A long wait to go solar," Feb. 12 I am a retired licensed engineer and a retired licensed solar contractor. One of the deciding factors (other than age) in my retiring from the solar business in 2003 was the increasingly bureaucratic nature of the permitting process. I attended more than one lecture on the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's approval process; there seemed to be no notion of time. Comparing this with Southern California Edison's process inclined us to avoid the DWP whenever possible.
OPINION
July 28, 2013
Re "Unlimited sick day pay costs DWP," July 26 Your headline is unintentionally misleading. This situation isn't costing the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power a penny; not a single executive or manager will feel pain as a result of DWP's poor labor and fiscal management that effectively allows employees to take unlimited sick days. No, these excesses are costing the DWP's ratepayers. This situation simply reinforces the perception that customers are indeed paying the DWP for a lot more than just water and power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant
Real estate agent Judy Oroshnik was doing a favor for a client when she offered to call the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's customer service line to resolve a problem. Forty minutes later, her goodwill was gone. That's how long it took for a live customer service representative to answer the call, and after some wrangling, find a solution for Oroshnik's client, the Silver Lake businesswoman said. "I've called New York City's Con Ed and I was able to get through to them at any time.
OPINION
August 3, 1997
No one reading "His Brown-Bag Lunch Was Worth Millions" (July 27) could deny Richard Callison deserves his $25,000 reward for spotting "one little clause on exemptions," which exempts DWP from a million-dollar fee they have been paying for 20 years. The really troubling part is that Callison's reward wasn't purely for saving the DWP millions of dollars; it was for the best suggestion of the month! I thought I was reading a Dilbert comic strip converted to text. Do they give $25,000 each month for the best suggestion?
OPINION
March 19, 1995
Leon Furgatch's column (Feb. 21) relied on erroneous facts and a fundamental misunderstanding of the City Charter. The key facts are as follows: -- The mayor believes that Department of Water and Power's shareholders--the citizens of this city--are entitled to a dividend by virtue of the city's ownership and their investment in the DWP. Their investment, the mayor believes, should generate dividends comparable to other investor-owned utilities such...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Jack Dolan
A Los Angeles judge signaled Tuesday that he intends to order Department of Water and Power union chief Brian D'Arcy to turn over financial information showing how two nonprofit trusts he co-directs used $40 million in ratepayer money. D'Arcy, who oversees the nonprofits with the utility's general manager, has been fighting city officials' efforts to account for the money since September, after The Times reported that DWP managers had only scant information about how the money has been spent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Before she even started as general manager of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, Marcie Edwards was asked by a city councilman how long she planned to stick around in a job that came with "a certain amount of abuse. " "I'm OK with getting knocked down," the 57-year-old Edwards said, adding that she planned to make this job, which she started this month, her last. "But I can consistently get back up. " Edwards is taking the reins of the DWP - an agency that has long frustrated City Hall leaders and the ratepayers they represent - as it reels from the troubled rollout of a new billing system and faces nagging questions about how two nonprofit trusts spent $40 million in public money.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2014 | By Shan Li
Californians pay the second-highest taxes in the nation, beat out only by New Yorkers. That's according to personal finance firm WalletHub, which took a look at how states stack up against each other when it comes to taxes. The conclusion , which should come as no surprise to taxpayers: Where you live has a large effect on how much Uncle Sam takes from your pocketbook. PHOTOS: World's most expensive cities Taxpayers in the states with the highest taxes pay about four times more than those in states with the lowest taxes, WalletHub said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said Tuesday he was bent on writing "a new chapter" for the Department of Water and Power with the help of its new leader Marcie Edwards - a task that goes beyond cleaning up its woebegone billing system, he said. In electing him mayor, "Los Angeles voters really gave me a mandate to reform the DWP," Garcetti told a roomful of business leaders and reporters Tuesday. Even his own father - onetime Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti - had complained to him about being on hold with the agency for more than 40 minutes, the mayor said.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2014 | By Shan Li
Although residents of Los Angeles and New York may complain about the high cost of living, the two cities can seem like a bargain compared with the truly wallet-squeezing metropolises of the world. Singapore, the city-state in Southeast Asia, takes the top spot as the priciest city to live, according to a biannual survey from the Economist Intelligence Unit. The survey calculates the cost of living for 131 metropolises around the world and compares price tags on hundreds of goods and services such as food, clothing and utilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Catherine Saillant
Despite promises to speed up customer service response times, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's telephone system is still making callers wait an average of nearly 30 minutes on hold, according to a new DWP website. A billing information page was launched this week to coincide with the arrival of Marcie Edwards, the new DWP head selected by Mayor Eric Garcetti to lead the city-owned utility. A chart on the website shows that wait times for customer calls averaged 29 minutes in late February, two minutes less than reported for the second week of November, when city officials vowed to fix an overwhelmed call system.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1997
The L.A. City Council will soon convene an ad hoc committee to formally study the restructuring of the Department of Water and Power, a process likely to entail raising power rates, cutting more than 1,000 jobs, forming a strategic partnership with an outside energy company and cutting DWP profits to the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Jack Dolan
Los Angeles firefighters on average earned nearly $43,000 in overtime in 2013, up nearly 20% from the year before, according to data released Tuesday by City Controller Ron Galperin. With overtime and bonuses factored in, the average firefighter was paid more than $142,000 last year, the data show. Though firefighters got the biggest share, overtime was up substantially across city departments, climbing more than $70 million to a total of $378 million in 2013, the data show. "The city is a 24-hour operation, so overtime is a part of doing business," Galperin said in a press release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2014 | By Christopher Goffard
Los Angeles high school students were vying Saturday for a chance to represent the city in a national science bowl in April. More than 225 local students, comprising 48 teams, were competing in the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's 22nd Science Bowl at the utility's Hope Street headquarters downtown. The competition "tests students' reflexes, teamwork skills and knowledge of science, math and technology in a fun competitive atmosphere following a television game show format," according to a DWP release.
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