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OPINION
November 29, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
It sometimes seems like the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power specializes in frustration. In September, the utility flipped the switch on a new $162-million customer information system that had been in the works for three years. The system includes meter reading, billing and customer service, and it replaces a 40-year-old model that was outdated 20 years ago. It's designed to be more efficient and more accurate, let customers resolve inquiries with one call and eventually enable the DWP to switch from bimonthly to monthly bills.
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BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Shan Li
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power said Wednesday it is hiring more workers and simplifying applications for customers who install solar panels on their roof. The efforts come as the utility faces criticism from many Angelenos who complain of long waits and bureaucratic hurdles when trying to get solar systems hooked to the power grid. The utility has doubled its staff for processing applications, and will also hire more workers to man its hotline, the LADWP said in a Wednesday statement.
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OPINION
April 27, 2008
Re "Electric utilities waging a power struggle," April 20 It is fair for Los Angeles Department of Water and Power customers to pay more for electricity. For years, its rates have been artificially low because of the DWP's purchase of cheap, dirty coal power. While people living downwind from the out-of-state coal plants are paying the cost with their health, DWP customers pay a low flat rate, which does nothing to discourage waste. The private utilities have tiered rates, with the highest ones just more than 30 cents a kilowatt hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power will undergo a state audit of its troubled computer billing system after a committee of state lawmakers voted Wednesday to examine what went wrong. The state audit, proposed last month by Assemblyman Raul Bocanegra (D-Pacoima), will scrutinize the rollout, costs and fallout of the system that sent erroneous and inflated bills to some customers. It will assess what it cost the city to address problems after the system went into effect, how the contract was awarded and the share of customers getting late or inaccurate bills, among other issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1990
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power commissioners on Thursday approved new subsidies for low-income residents, which could trim about 15% off the average water and power bill for low-income residents. Water bills for disadvantaged families could be cut by $1.98 a month and electricity bills by $3.35 a month under the plan, which must be approved by the City Council. Others would see an increase of less than 1% in their bills to make up the difference, DWP officials said.
NEWS
September 16, 1990
The letter by UCLA Chancellor Young is as good a piece of special pleading and disinformation as we've seen in a long time. (Times, Sept. 2) The chancellor mentions an outside source for power that is both too expensive and unreliable and must therefore be replaced to provide better service to the UCLA campus. What the chancellor does not mention is that the outside power source is the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and that UCLA is its biggest customer. All power systems are subject to very occasional outages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1985
Four hundred Department of Water and Power customers in Tarzana lost their electricity early Saturday when a pickup truck crashed into a power pole, a DWP spokeswoman said. The outage began at 3 a.m., and half of the customers, near Corbin Avenue and Rosita Street, had their power restored by 5 a.m., said spokeswoman Elizabeth Wimmer. The rest of the homes had power restored by 9:05 a.m., Wimmer said. Police said they responded to a 3:05 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2010 | By David Zahniser
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa is moving ahead with a plan requiring customers of the Department of Water and Power to pay higher bills to help the utility tap more sources of renewable energy. While Villaraigosa has been talking publicly about the need for the city to tighten its belt, his advisors have been working behind the scenes to gauge public support for a monthly DWP "carbon surcharge" of $2.50 -- one that would move the utility away from coal and toward wind, solar and geothermal sources of energy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2010
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa has been seeking a quartet of electric rate hikes to help pay for his renewable energy programs and existing expenses, such as the fluctuating cost of coal. Those increases, which are currently on hold, would have had a wide range of effects on residential ratepayers' monthly bills, depending on where they live and how much energy they consume: TIER 1 Those who use the least amount of power (58% of DWP customers) San Fernando Valley (and some warmer neighborhoods)
BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Shan Li
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power said Wednesday it is hiring more workers and simplifying applications for customers who install solar panels on their roof. The efforts come as the utility faces criticism from many Angelenos who complain of long waits and bureaucratic hurdles when trying to get solar systems hooked to the power grid. The utility has doubled its staff for processing applications, and will also hire more workers to man its hotline, the LADWP said in a Wednesday statement.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2014 | By Shan Li
More than one in four Americans are so afraid of missing work that they head into the office even when sniffling and sneezing, a study says. Many are worried about falling behind on their jobs, missing pay or facing the wrath of bosses who expect them to show up no matter what, according to a survey by NSF International, which tests and certifies public health products. Nearly 20% of Americans report always showing up for work while sick. And 17% of workers say they stay home only if a doctor orders them to, the report says.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Shan Li
Asa Lantz never thought going green would involve so much red tape. The 48-year-old wanted to slash her utility bill and help the environment by putting solar panels on the roof of her one-story Van Nuys home. The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power promised her system would be hooked up within three months after it was approved in September. She's still waiting. Lantz is one of many Angelenos who complain of excessive delays and bureaucratic run-arounds when trying to get solar panels hooked to the electric grid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2014 | Steve Lopez
You can add the Los Angeles County district attorney's office to the long list of agencies and public officials going after one of the most powerful political players in the city. A D.A. source told me Tuesday that prosecutors have renewed their interest in getting their hands on records being withheld by Brian D'Arcy, head of the largest union representing employees at the Department of Water and Power. The D.A.'s office is working with City Controller Ron Galperin to figure out the "best way to obtain and examine" the records, I'm told.
OPINION
November 29, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
It sometimes seems like the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power specializes in frustration. In September, the utility flipped the switch on a new $162-million customer information system that had been in the works for three years. The system includes meter reading, billing and customer service, and it replaces a 40-year-old model that was outdated 20 years ago. It's designed to be more efficient and more accurate, let customers resolve inquiries with one call and eventually enable the DWP to switch from bimonthly to monthly bills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant
Real estate agent Judy Oroshnik was doing a favor for a client when she offered to call the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's customer service line to resolve a problem. Forty minutes later, her goodwill was gone. That's how long it took for a live customer service representative to answer the call, and after some wrangling, find a solution for Oroshnik's client, the Silver Lake businesswoman said. "I've called New York City's Con Ed and I was able to get through to them at any time.
OPINION
July 30, 2013
Re "DWP sick pay change urged," July 27 We've known that the employees of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power make, on average, 50% more than other city employees and 25% more than other local utilities' employees; now we see that "abuse" of an outdated sick-day policy is costing the DWP millions. Kudos to Mayor Eric Garcetti for his quick response in calling for changes to this policy. Now that the DWP pay contract is up for discussion, this is a perfect opportunity to negotiate a reasonable contract that will bring DWP employees into alignment with city and other local utilities' employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power will undergo a state audit of its troubled computer billing system after a committee of state lawmakers voted Wednesday to examine what went wrong. The state audit, proposed last month by Assemblyman Raul Bocanegra (D-Pacoima), will scrutinize the rollout, costs and fallout of the system that sent erroneous and inflated bills to some customers. It will assess what it cost the city to address problems after the system went into effect, how the contract was awarded and the share of customers getting late or inaccurate bills, among other issues.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2013 | Catherine Green
Atop a beige apartment complex in North Hollywood, rows of solar panels began providing energy Wednesday as part of what backers say is the nation's largest urban rooftop solar program. Called Clean L.A. Solar, the program allows the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power to pay customers to generate solar power across the city's vast expanse of flat roof space. The goal of the effort, the brainchild of the Los Angeles Business Council, is to generate 150 megawatts of solar electricity, or enough to power about 30,000 homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2013 | Steve Lopez
If you bumped into the guy, you probably wouldn't recognize him. Chances are, you've never even heard of him. But he's one of the most powerful players in Los Angeles politics, and he's swinging for the fences again, using his considerable clout to boost mayoral candidate Wendy Greuel and a slate of City Council candidates who just might be inclined to serve his interests if they're elected. Feared, coveted, respected, reviled - union boss Brian D'Arcy is all those things. But he likes to pull strings from behind the curtains and generally doesn't stoop low enough to speak to pesky media folks.
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