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Dyes

TRAVEL
July 21, 1991 | JENNIFER MERIN
The fine fabrics that decorate France's most elegant homes, hotels and boutiques have been made popular around the world, largely through the marketing successes of Souleiado, a company that sells distinctive cottons, wools and silk challis in the United States under the Pierre Deux label.
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MAGAZINE
June 4, 1989 | JUDITH SIMS
LIKE ITS COUSIN batik, tie-dyeing first started in the Orient, spreading from China through India and Japan to Malaya, Thailand, Cambodia and even Africa. Pre-Columbian Indians in Central and South America also used the technique. The emergence of tie-dyeing in the United States in the '60s was credited in part to Peace Corps volunteers who discovered the craft in remote areas of the globe and brought it home. When it came to tie-dyeing, people with little training or background in art confidently forged ahead, T-shirt in one hand, Rit dye in the other.
FOOD
April 4, 1996 | TRACY CROWE McGONIGLE
The Estonians were dyeing eggs this way before it was cool, long before Martha Stewart discovered the kirjumunad ("variegated egg") technique. It's onion skins that give the eggs their mosaic-like patina. And the colors are amazing--yellow, gold, rust and red--every egg turns out different. Who needs food coloring?
HOME & GARDEN
April 18, 1992 | From Associated Press
Learning to color Easter eggs the natural way--using vegetables, plants and spices as dye and design materials--can change your family's annual egg-dipping ritual. This year, instead of dissolving commercial dye tablets, set out pans of boiling water and fill them with stain-producing foods such as spinach, beets, saffron and paprika. Using the following tips from the Pratt Center in New Milford, Conn.
SPORTS
December 16, 1986 | STEVE LOWERY, Times Staff Writer
The trek from Fantasyland to Tree City, U.S.A.--by way of The Real World and Bakersfield--has left Bobby Dye remarkably intact. You remember Bobby. Basketball coach. Nice guy. Parts his teeth in the middle. Well, he's hanging out in Idaho these days. Idaho, land of potatoes and . . . potatoes. Oh, it was just a joke. Idaho is a great place. Great people, great outdoors. Bobby will tell you. He'll tell you Idaho is a great place over and over. "This is a great place. I really love it here.
SPORTS
August 19, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Outfielder Jermaine Dye agreed to terms on a two-year, $22 million contract extension Saturday to stay with the Chicago White Sox through the 2009 season. Dye, the most vaulable player of the 2005 World Series, could have been a free agent at the end of this season. Dye will receive $9.5 million in 2008 and $11.5 million in 2009. A mutual option pays him $12 million for the 2010 season or gives him a $1-million buyout. Dye, 33, has a team-high 24 home runs and is batting .
NEWS
June 12, 1991 | SYBIL BAKER
You can keep your letters, slogans and politics, say these folks in Pasadena and Pomona. Take your linear thinking and fold it--the time has come for the Brain-T'ser. Tie-dye, which made a comeback during the Gulf War, has made the real chest nut pose a question, rather than furnish an answer. Am I You? Who am Eye? Is this swirl a shell or a whirlwind? Can any gathering of T-shirt wearers constitute a pictograph, the way any traffic jam presents a license-plate game?
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA
The streets of L.A. can be a real head trip. From the Venice boardwalk to a walk along Melrose Avenue, guys in natural shorn killer cuts are dyeing to get noticed. Bozo red, Big Bird yellow, old lady blue--the more outrageous the hue, the more hair-raising the look. And whether the dude 'dos are gelled, buzzed or pointed to the heavens above, it's really the tone of the dome that matters. Indeed, some wear over the rainbow.
NEWS
August 4, 1988
Tie-dye clothing conjures up images of the psychedelic '60s and Grateful Dead concerts, but 21 years after the summer of love, that curiously dyed fabric is creeping back to boutiques throughout Los Angeles. Never mind that some who sport tie-dye today weren't even born when the fad first swept the nation. This time around, the garments are worn more as fashion statements than counterculture ones.
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