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Dyna Five Corp

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BUSINESS
February 6, 1991 | DEAN TAKAHASHI
Dyna Five Corp. of Anaheim said Monday that it has completed a management buyout--led by founder R.J. Thielen--from Gradco Systems Inc. in Irvine. The price was not disclosed. Dyna Five was acquired in 1987 by Gradco, a maker of copier products, as part of a move into the computer-products business. But last year the money-losing parent company decided to move much of its operations overseas.
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BUSINESS
February 6, 1991 | DEAN TAKAHASHI
Dyna Five Corp. of Anaheim said Monday that it has completed a management buyout--led by founder R.J. Thielen--from Gradco Systems Inc. in Irvine. The price was not disclosed. Dyna Five was acquired in 1987 by Gradco, a maker of copier products, as part of a move into the computer-products business. But last year the money-losing parent company decided to move much of its operations overseas.
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BUSINESS
March 8, 1991 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gradco Systems Inc. has alleged in a lawsuit that former chairman and chief executive officer Keith B. Stewart misappropriated funds from the copier and printer products company for personal use. According to a recent filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Gradco charges in court papers that Stewart improperly obtained company funds in a stock transaction involving the company's Japanese subsidiary. Stewart, the founder of Gradco, could not be reached for comment.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1989 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dyna Five Corp. hardly seems like an international trend-setter. The tiny Anaheim company has only about $4 million in sales annually and employs 25 people. The firm's brochures of computer components aren't exactly razzle-dazzle either. Yet, local international trade experts point to Dyna Five as a front-runner in what is shaping up as a mad dash to enter the European business community before the end of 1992.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Keith B. Stewart, an articulate man with a graying beard and a stern demeanor, has built a company that looks on the surface like a classic entrepreneurial success. In little more than 10 years, his Irvine-based Gradco Systems Inc. has grown from a lowly distributor of paper-feeders to a $100-million company that claims a virtual monopoly on certain copy machine accessories.
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