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Dysentery

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SCIENCE
May 21, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
An inexpensive arthritis drug called auranofin has been shown in lab and animal tests to kill the parasites that cause amoebic dysentery and giardiasis, and human trials are expected to start soon. The gold-containing drug, marketed under the trade name Ridaura, has already been demonstrated to be safe in humans, is much more powerful than existing treatments, and could be provided in developing countries for as little as $2.50 per dose, researchers said. If the results hold up in clinical trials, the drug could provide a new way to reduce suffering in both children and adults.
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SCIENCE
May 21, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
An inexpensive arthritis drug called auranofin has been shown in lab and animal tests to kill the parasites that cause amoebic dysentery and giardiasis, and human trials are expected to start soon. The gold-containing drug, marketed under the trade name Ridaura, has already been demonstrated to be safe in humans, is much more powerful than existing treatments, and could be provided in developing countries for as little as $2.50 per dose, researchers said. If the results hold up in clinical trials, the drug could provide a new way to reduce suffering in both children and adults.
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NEWS
November 10, 2001 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An epidemic of an infectious dysentery disease has swept this city in recent months, afflicting mostly young children in diapers and their caregivers. The city health department has tracked more than 2,000 cases of shigellosis, which causes stomach cramps, fever and diarrhea. That tally--mounting daily--makes the outbreak the second-largest shigellosis epidemic recorded by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
NEWS
November 10, 2001 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An epidemic of an infectious dysentery disease has swept this city in recent months, afflicting mostly young children in diapers and their caregivers. The city health department has tracked more than 2,000 cases of shigellosis, which causes stomach cramps, fever and diarrhea. That tally--mounting daily--makes the outbreak the second-largest shigellosis epidemic recorded by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1986
Some Stueffe's raw milk products were recalled Friday in Orange County because routine tests showed that they might be contaminated with a bacteria that causes serious stomach disorders, the director of the county Health Care Agency said. Director Robert E. Merryman said his agency was asked by the state health department to recall from grocers' shelves certain Stueffe's products. Stueffe's is produced by the Altadena Dairy Co. of Los Angeles County, Merryman said.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | Times Wire Services
As dysentery steals cholera's grim title as the most widespread affliction in Goma's refugee camps, one relief official Tuesday predicted the almost unimaginable--an upsurge in deaths. Children will be hardest hit, she said, by the deadly dysentery spreading among the more than 1 million Rwandans jammed into camps along Zaire's eastern border. "Dysentery has overtaken cholera" as the main disease afflicting refugees, said Samantha Bolton of the relief group Doctors Without Borders.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
An estimated 500 Americans came home from Cancun, Mexico, last year with a severe form of dysentery that sent some of them to the hospital for a month, according to a U.S. government study. The disease was caused by a strain of bacteria almost identical to one that infected 500,000 people in Central America between 1969 and 1972, killing 20,000, said Dr. Julie Parsonnet of Stanford University.
TRAVEL
August 29, 1993 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Sue Allison listened carefully as the tour director admonished her group not to eat anything but the meals provided during the seven-day riverboat trip from Peru to Brazil. The risk was illness transmitted through contaminated food or water. Even though she followed instructions, the 50-year-old Santa Monica resident woke up on the third night of her trip with abdominal cramping and bloody diarrhea. No matter how much water she drank, she still felt thirsty.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | SHAWN DOHERTY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bible Tabernacle, a little stucco church in Venice that has been home to thousands of families with nowhere else to go, has been shut down by county officials for violations of health and safety standards. The church is the largest family shelter on the Westside. It was quarantined last month after officials discovered an epidemic of dysentery due to unsanitary conditions they claimed was caused by the crowding of more than 200 people in the tiny church.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's not a genius or neurotic. Nor is he a man with extraordinary drive or with anything to him extraordinary at all, but just someone who seems to feel unshakably sure he can handle whatever he comes up against and not get hurt trying. . . . He is the only one of the thousands of targets I have met in the shooting part of the present war to whom it has never occurred, under any circumstances, that he could be killed. He's got this belief in himself and it sits in him like an anvil.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | Times Wire Services
As dysentery steals cholera's grim title as the most widespread affliction in Goma's refugee camps, one relief official Tuesday predicted the almost unimaginable--an upsurge in deaths. Children will be hardest hit, she said, by the deadly dysentery spreading among the more than 1 million Rwandans jammed into camps along Zaire's eastern border. "Dysentery has overtaken cholera" as the main disease afflicting refugees, said Samantha Bolton of the relief group Doctors Without Borders.
TRAVEL
August 29, 1993 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Sue Allison listened carefully as the tour director admonished her group not to eat anything but the meals provided during the seven-day riverboat trip from Peru to Brazil. The risk was illness transmitted through contaminated food or water. Even though she followed instructions, the 50-year-old Santa Monica resident woke up on the third night of her trip with abdominal cramping and bloody diarrhea. No matter how much water she drank, she still felt thirsty.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | SHAWN DOHERTY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bible Tabernacle, a little stucco church in Venice that has been home to thousands of families with nowhere else to go, has been shut down by county officials for violations of health and safety standards. The church is the largest family shelter on the Westside. It was quarantined last month after officials discovered an epidemic of dysentery due to unsanitary conditions they claimed was caused by the crowding of more than 200 people in the tiny church.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
An estimated 500 Americans came home from Cancun, Mexico, last year with a severe form of dysentery that sent some of them to the hospital for a month, according to a U.S. government study. The disease was caused by a strain of bacteria almost identical to one that infected 500,000 people in Central America between 1969 and 1972, killing 20,000, said Dr. Julie Parsonnet of Stanford University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1986
Some Stueffe's raw milk products were recalled Friday in Orange County because routine tests showed that they might be contaminated with a bacteria that causes serious stomach disorders, the director of the county Health Care Agency said. Director Robert E. Merryman said his agency was asked by the state health department to recall from grocers' shelves certain Stueffe's products. Stueffe's is produced by the Altadena Dairy Co. of Los Angeles County, Merryman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
The yellowing government survey map of San Nicolas Island dated from 1879, but it was quite clear: There was a big black dot on the southwest coast and, next to it, the words "Indian Cave. " For more than 20 years, Navy archaeologist Steve Schwartz searched for that cave. It was believed to be home to the island's most famous inhabitant, a Native American woman who survived on the island for 18 years, abandoned and alone, and became the inspiration for "Island of the Blue Dolphins," one of the 20th century's most popular novels for young readers.
NEWS
August 18, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The recent brain-eating amoeba deaths in Florida, Louisiana and Virginia may have some people wondering something they haven't given a thought to since the last basic bio class: What is an amoeba anyway?  Well, it just so happens that in cleaning out my garage the other day I unearthed my 1978 college notes from a class called “Fundamentals of Biological Organization,” and as luck would have it, they contained a rendition of an amoeba, below. OK, so it's not very good.
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