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Dyslexia

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan
Movies helped Steven Spielberg cope with his dyslexia, the director of "Jaws" and "Schindler's List" said in a rare interview about being diagnosed with the learning disability five years ago. "It was like the last puzzle part in a tremendous mystery that I've kept to myself all these years," Spielberg, 65, told the website "Friends of Quinn. " As a child, Spielberg said he learned to read two years later than his classmates, which made him subject to teasing and caused him to dread school.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
What if we lived in a world where the weak were really strong, and all of our disadvantages could easily become advantages? In his new book, "David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants," bestselling writer Malcolm Gladwell tells us we're already living in that kind of world. Even something as debilitating as dyslexia can be an ambitious man's ticket to success. "The one trait in a lot of dyslexic people I know is that by the time we got out of college, our ability to deal with failure was very highly developed," says Gary Cohn, a man of humble origins whose bold decisions take him to the top of the U.S. financial industry.
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NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
One's intelligence appears unrelated to the specific brain pattern that causes dyslexia, researchers reported Thursday. The findings are important because they suggest that IQ shouldn't be considered by education specialists when diagnosing dyslexia. In fact, doing say may bar some children from receiving special education services to improve reading comprehension. The study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was undertaken because many educators diagnose dyslexia based on a lag between reading scores and overall IQ scores.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan
Movies helped Steven Spielberg cope with his dyslexia, the director of "Jaws" and "Schindler's List" said in a rare interview about being diagnosed with the learning disability five years ago. "It was like the last puzzle part in a tremendous mystery that I've kept to myself all these years," Spielberg, 65, told the website "Friends of Quinn. " As a child, Spielberg said he learned to read two years later than his classmates, which made him subject to teasing and caused him to dread school.
HEALTH
November 28, 2011 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We rarely stop to think about it, but reading is an amazing accomplishment. It turns markings on a page or a screen into coherent thoughts. It's a complicated process: The eyes see a procession of letters, and the brain turns them into words. The reading process is challenging for people with dyslexia. The disorder isn't well understood, but there seems to be a communication breakdown between the eyes and the brain. Some people with dyslexia have trouble associating letters with sounds and words.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2000
Milton Brutten, 77, an expert on dyslexia who founded one of the nation's first private schools for children with learning disabilities. In 1960, along with educator Henry Evans, Brutten co-founded the Vanguard School in Paoli, Pa., after he found many families unable to obtain appropriate educational services and placement for their children. In 1977, Brutten founded the Crossroad School for dyslexic students, also in suburban Philadelphia.
SCIENCE
August 30, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Finnish researchers said they have found a gene they believe could be important in the cause of dyslexia, the most common learning disorder among children. Dyslexia affects between 3% and 10% of the population and is characterized by difficulties recognizing and reading words. The researchers studied a father and his three children, all of whom are dyslexic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1996 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When organizers began planning Saturday's seminar on dyslexia, they invited hundreds of pediatricians in hopes of heightening awareness of the reading disorder in medical circles. But only a handful of physicians signed up, and educators, parents and some nurses instead dominated the audience of 150. The absence of pediatricians concerned Joyce Kassouf, who said they could aid in early detection.
NEWS
March 3, 1998 | From the Washington Post
For the first time, scientists have been able to identify specific brain malfunctions involved in dyslexia--a discovery that could substantially improve understanding of the chronic reading problem that afflicts about 10 million Americans. Equally important, said lead researcher Sally E. Shaywitz of Yale University School of Medicine, the work provides scientific confirmation "for what has previously been a hidden disability."
SPORTS
March 25, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
Rob Nelson, a first-base prospect for the Padres, had just enlivened an intrasquad game by powering a ball about 425 feet over the right-field fence and into a parking lot. "Did you get all of it?" someone jokingly asked him after he had crossed home plate. "If you saw it come down, then I didn't get all of it," he said with a shrug.
SPORTS
May 30, 2012 | By Diane Pucin
Logan Dooley is a favorite to represent the United States as the men's trampoline competitor this summer at the Olympics. He is the first American man to win a gold medal at a World Cup event and that makes him at least a bit of a threat to be on the London medal podium, which would be considered quite an upset. But here he was, less than three months before the Olympics, giving a lesson to 4-year-old Soheil Ghavami at World Elite Gymnastics in Rancho Santa Margarita. Soheil's mother, Minoo Ghavami of Mission Viejo, was clapping her hands when Dooley would pat Soheil on the back or whisper an instruction in his ear. "This is our first lesson with Logan Dooley," Minoo said.
HEALTH
November 28, 2011 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We rarely stop to think about it, but reading is an amazing accomplishment. It turns markings on a page or a screen into coherent thoughts. It's a complicated process: The eyes see a procession of letters, and the brain turns them into words. The reading process is challenging for people with dyslexia. The disorder isn't well understood, but there seems to be a communication breakdown between the eyes and the brain. Some people with dyslexia have trouble associating letters with sounds and words.
NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
One's intelligence appears unrelated to the specific brain pattern that causes dyslexia, researchers reported Thursday. The findings are important because they suggest that IQ shouldn't be considered by education specialists when diagnosing dyslexia. In fact, doing say may bar some children from receiving special education services to improve reading comprehension. The study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was undertaken because many educators diagnose dyslexia based on a lag between reading scores and overall IQ scores.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Stephen J. Cannell, the prolific television writer and producer who co-created "The Rockford Files" and "The A-Team" and later became a bestselling novelist, has died. He was 69. Cannell died Thursday evening of complications associated with melanoma at his home in Pasadena, his family said. In a career that began in the late 1960s when he sold his first TV script and took off as he soon became the hottest young writer on the Universal lot, Cannell created or co-created more than 40 TV shows, including "Baa Baa Black Sheep," "Baretta," "The Greatest American Hero" and "21 Jump Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2010 | By Rachel Abramowitz
CAST: Logan Lerman, Rosario Dawson, Pierce Brosnan, Uma Thurman, Catherine Keener. Directed by Chris Columbus. BACK STORY: Based on the Rick Riordan bestseller, a huge fan favorite among 10-year-old boys, the film tells of young Percy, a fatherless kid suffering from dyslexia and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, who discovers that he's actually the son of the immortal Poseidon and that the mythic Mount Olympus of Greek gods...
NATIONAL
November 15, 2007 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
A doctor who was barred from taking part in executions in Missouri because of concerns his dyslexia would interfere with his ability to administer lethal injections is helping the federal government carry out death sentences in Indiana, according to court documents.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
By scanning the brains of people reading English, French and Italian, researchers for the first time have demonstrated that dyslexia can be more severe depending on which written language people learn. Indeed, the reading disorder is twice as prevalent in the United States, where it affects an estimated 10 million children, as in Italy, where the written word more consistently matches its spoken sound.
SPORTS
December 22, 1991 | BARBIE LUDOVISE
Jason Surrell is passionate about soccer. Lives it, loves it, considers it part of his total being. The sounds of the sport--the crash of a kick, the tap-tap-tap of the dribble--draw him to the field like a siren song. Surrell, a senior midfielder at Irvine High School, wants to play in college and knows he has the ability. The college coaches tell him so. They come to his games, watch his smooth moves and tenacious defense. They call him an impact player.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Roger E. Saunders, 82, a psychologist who nearly 50 years ago helped pioneer the diagnosis and treatment of dyslexia, died of a heart attack Feb. 23 at Lexington Memorial Hospital in Lexington, N.C. When he was hired in 1957 as director of psychological services for the Baltimore County Board of Education, he discovered that Maryland was a "wasteland" for understanding reading disorders, Saunders told the Baltimore Sun in 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2005 | Mimi Avins, Times Staff Writer
Believers in karma might say that Henry Winkler's midlife rewards are a payback for emerging from a difficult childhood as a very nice person. At 60, he has a key role in "Out of Practice," the sly new CBS sitcom that's been one of the few freshman shows to break the top 20; he also co-authors a series of critically acclaimed comic novels for schoolkids based on his experiences growing up.
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