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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1998 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Community college trustees on Wednesday took the first step toward leasing out the Pierce College farm by asking for development proposals for the 240 acres. But the trustees of the Los Angeles Community College District made it clear that they were interested in all offers, not just the golf course, club house and new classroom building which already have been suggested for the Woodland Hills campus. The vote was 5 to 1, with one abstention from the Valley's only trustee, Georgia Mercer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
An infusion of state and federal funds will enable Pierce College to make long-awaited improvements to increase the safety and accessibility of the campus for disabled students. In an effort to comply with the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Los Angeles Community College District recently gave $1.5 million to Pierce. Valley College and Mission College got lesser sums, but those amounts were not available.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1997 | REBECCA ANDRADE
Jack Fujimoto, who began his 30-year career in the 1950s, enjoys being a pioneer educational administrator and teacher. In 1978 he was appointed president of Sacramento City College, becoming the first Asian American to head a community college in the United States. In 1989 he was named interim president of Mission College in Sylmar and was appointed to the post permanently two years later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1997 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two dozen impassioned supporters of the Pierce College agricultural farm urged its preservation Wednesday night at a community college trustees meeting held on campus to discuss developing a master plan for the college. The backers of the farm fear it is in jeopardy because of proposals to lease out some of its 435 acres for commercial development to recoup the college's expected $4.8 million budget shortfall this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1998 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN and ERIC SONDHEIMER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As if being mired in a money crisis isn't messy enough, Pierce College got some real muck to wallow in over the weekend, after flag football players turned its fields of green into muddy waters. Worse, the football tournament Air-It-Out, sponsored by the National Football League, was supposed to bring in about $4,000 to the cash-starved campus, not leave parts of it resembling a swamp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
A long-brewing debate over the future of Pierce College farmland resurfaced this week, as a developer presented a preliminary proposal to a college panel to convert part of the property into a golf course and golf education complex. College officials said the concept, unveiled at a meeting of the planning committee for the Pierce College Council, has initially found favor with the administration because of its educational purpose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1998 | SUE FOX
The lawn was blanketed with hundreds of chairs, the podium fortified with loudspeakers. But at a Thursday rally to spark voter turnout among Pierce College students, only a few dozen showed up. Forsaking the microphone to stand near the small clump of students, Pierce President E. Bing Inocencio recalled a bumper sticker he'd seen that read: "I don't care about apathy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1996 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
The annual July Fourth fireworks show at Pierce College has become a liability rather than a boon for the campus and the college shouldn't be involved, new college President E. Bing Inocencio said Wednesday. Citing large repair costs for property damage caused by Independence Day revelers and complaints by visitors about the cost of the last event, Inocencio said it may be time for the fireworks display to be held elsewhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1999
Signaling Los Angeles Pierce College's strongest commitment to agricultural education in years, President Rocky Young hosted an unprecedented campus meeting with 40 agriculture experts to discuss the future of the campus' 240-acre farm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1998 | SUE FOX
It all started about four years ago, when Duc Tran bought a few roses to speckle a bit of color around the entrance to Pierce College. Tran, a gardener at Pierce, paid for the flowers himself, inadvertently sparking a long-running but friendly competition among the gardeners to fill the campus with lush blossoms and neatly pruned shrubs.
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