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OPINION
January 3, 2005 | Walter Shapiro
Has there ever been a political party so prone to adolescent crises of insecurity as the Democrats? After every dispiriting election, the Democrats turn themselves into a desperate high school suitor, begging a would-be prom date: "Tell me who you want me to be. I promise I'll change."
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BUSINESS
March 8, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voter.com, a popular political Web site that folded last month, is trying to raise cash by auctioning its consumer database, including the e-mail addresses, party affiliations and political interests of about 170,000 subscribers. The defunct Internet site is the latest to raise privacy hackles by peddling data about its users. A similar move last year by bankrupt Toysmart.com prompted a lawsuit by the Federal Trade Commission.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2011 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
Federal prosecutors said Tuesday that they had charged two men with stealing e-mail addresses and other information from about 120,000 Apple iPad tablet users. Daniel Spitler, 26, of San Francisco and Andrew Auernheimer, 25, of Fayetteville, Ark., each were accused last week of conspiring to hack into AT&T Inc.'s servers and possessing subscriber data from those servers, according to the U.S. attorney's office in New Jersey, where the case is being prosecuted. Prosecutors said the criminal charges stem from a "brute force" hacking spree that took place over several days last June.
SPORTS
October 15, 2012 | By Brian Cronin
SOCCER/FOOTBALL URBAN LEGEND : Pele was paid to tie his shoelaces in the 1970 World Cup Final. Nowadays, the idea of athletes endorsing sneakers is well ingrained in the public consciousness. Seemingly every draft class in the NBA has at least one player sign an endorsement deal with one of the major sneaker companies in the United States (for instance, Anthony Davis, the first pick of the 2012 NBA Draft, has already signed with Nike). However, in the early days of the so-called "sneaker wars" between rival shoe companies Adidas and Puma, athlete endorsements were seen as a much bigger risk.
SPORTS
March 6, 1999 | RANDY HARVEY
As Evander Holyfield flipped through the pages of a children's book with his daughter in the back of a stretch limo, en route to an appointment with a documentary film maker in Hollywood, the people traveling with the heavyweight champion were earning their pay in crisis management. Did Jack Nicholson, as rumored, have flu, they asked via their cell phones. If so, did he still plan to attend Friday night's Laker game against Seattle?
NEWS
April 28, 2001 | From Associated Press
Sheriff Joe Arpaio turned off one of his "jail cams" that showed female inmates using a toilet, a view that could be accessed via the Internet. The decision followed complaints from inmate rights groups and the state attorney general. Donna Hamm, director of Middle Ground, an inmate-rights group in Tempe, said Thursday that the camera exploited the women and was linked to pornographic sites on the Internet. She asked the Justice Department to investigate for civil rights violations.
SPORTS
July 23, 2012 | By Brian Cronin
  OLYMPIC URBAN LEGEND : Nadia Comaneci performed her floor routine to the song "Nadia's Theme" during the 1976 Summer Olympics. The Olympics have an uncommon ability to take athletes from relative obscurity to international stardom, all in the span of a couple of weeks. For instance, Bruce Jenner was already an accomplished decathlete by 1974, but his national profile was negligible before the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal where he became a national hero in the United States by setting a new world record in the decathlon while winning the gold medal in the event.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2004 | Leslie Gornstein, Special to The Times
A small wooden cabinet went up for auction on EBay. Inside were two locks of hair, one granite slab, one dried rosebud, one goblet, two wheat pennies, one candlestick and, allegedly, one "dibbuk," a kind of spirit popular in Yiddish folklore. The seller, a Missouri college student named Iosif Nietzke, described the container as a "haunted Jewish wine cabinet box" that had plagued several owners with rotten luck and a spate of bizarre paranormal stunts.
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