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E Randol Schoenberg

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1996 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The University of Southern California and the heirs of Arnold Schoenberg have found some common ground in their long-running battle over the school's treatment of the eminent composer and the massive, world-renowned collection of his scores, artifacts and papers. The collection still will be pulled from USC--and probably from Southern California--but a settlement reached Wednesday puts an end to the ongoing legal battles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 17, 2012 | Patt Morrison
The riches and treasures of Europe vacuumed up by Hitler's Third Reich are still turning up, including some paintings Hitler bought for himself that were just found in a Czech monastery. But most of the Fuhrer's loot was just that: looted. Once in a while, it gets returned to its rightful owners. Los Angeles lawyer E. Randol Schoenberg joined forces with Maria Altmann in a legal battle to reclaim her family's collection of paintings, seized by the Nazis in 1938. The artworks, by Gustav Klimt, included a famous portrait of Altmann's aunt, Adele Bloch-Bauer, that was hanging in plain sight in an Austrian state museum.
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OPINION
March 17, 2012 | Patt Morrison
The riches and treasures of Europe vacuumed up by Hitler's Third Reich are still turning up, including some paintings Hitler bought for himself that were just found in a Czech monastery. But most of the Fuhrer's loot was just that: looted. Once in a while, it gets returned to its rightful owners. Los Angeles lawyer E. Randol Schoenberg joined forces with Maria Altmann in a legal battle to reclaim her family's collection of paintings, seized by the Nazis in 1938. The artworks, by Gustav Klimt, included a famous portrait of Altmann's aunt, Adele Bloch-Bauer, that was hanging in plain sight in an Austrian state museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1996 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The University of Southern California and the heirs of Arnold Schoenberg have found some common ground in their long-running battle over the school's treatment of the eminent composer and the massive, world-renowned collection of his scores, artifacts and papers. The collection still will be pulled from USC--and probably from Southern California--but a settlement reached Wednesday puts an end to the ongoing legal battles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2003 | Diane Haithman
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge has ruled that a legal battle over the ownership of a $10-million Picasso painting looted by the Nazis should be waged in Chicago, rather than Los Angeles, where the lawsuit in the case was filed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2006
E. Randol Schoenberg, the attorney who engineered the return of five Nazi-looted Gustav Klimt paintings for Los Angeles resident Maria Altmann, will be honored by the Beverly Hills Bar Assn. on May 31. The event will be held at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and includes a viewing of the paintings and a screening of the documentary "Klimt: Adele's Last Will."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2003 | Scott Timberg
A judge has ruled that the case of a looted $10-million Picasso painting, taken by the Nazis in World War II, should move from California to Illinois jurisdiction. In December, UC Berkeley law student Thomas Bennigson sued in L.A. to regain control of "Woman in White" from its current owner, Chicago philanthropist Marilynn Alsdorf. According to Bennigson's attorney, E. Randol Schoenberg, the venue change is a stalling tactic: "It could add a year to the case." Schoenberg is appealing the ruling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1993
Apparently, Ruben Martinez finds it somehow symbolic that UCLA's Schoenberg Plaza has been appropriated and renamed "Plaza Aztlan" by Chicano activists ("The Emergence of L.A.'s True Identity," Commentary, June 9). The transformation is supposed to symbolize the reawakening of L.A.'s Mexican past. Schoenberg Plaza is not named after merely another "dead European composer," but after my grandfather, Arnold Schoenberg, a Jew born in Vienna who fled Nazi persecution in Europe in 1933 and spent the last 17 years of his life right here in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2013 | By David Ng
The Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust said on Monday that it has named Samara Hutman as its new executive director. Hutman -- who comes from Remember Us, a Holocaust education organization -- will report to museum President E. Randol Schoenberg. Hutman served as executive director of Remember Us since 2011. Remember Us works with middle and high schools to promote Holocaust awareness. She will officially begin her new job at the L.A. Museum of the Holocaust on Tuesday. CRITICS' PICKS: What to watch, where to go, what to eat At the museum, Hutman will take on the executive director role that Schoenberg had filled on a temporary basis.
NEWS
May 19, 2005 | Diane Haithman
In an agreement that will end a eight-year legal battle, 89-year-old Cheviot Hills resident Maria Altmann and the Republic of Austria have agreed to end their litigation in U.S. District Court regarding six Gustav Klimt paintings and to submit the dispute to binding arbitration in Austria.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Maria Altmann, the Austrian-born woman who has been awarded five Gustav Klimt paintings seized by Nazis, also has been granted a stake in a historic building in downtown Vienna. An arbitration panel in Austria recommended that the so-called Palais, estimated to be worth about $6 million, should be returned to Altmann's family. The decision was made Monday and received by Altmann, who lives in Los Angeles, Wednesday. Austria has said it will abide by the panel's decision.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2004 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
The California Supreme Court has agreed to decide whether state courts can hear a dispute over the ownership of a Picasso painting allegedly stolen from the plaintiff's grandmother by Nazis during World War II. The dispute centers on Picasso's 1922 oil painting "Femme en blanc" (Woman in White), believed to have been stolen from a Paris art dealer's home in 1942 and purchased in 1975 by Chicago collectors and philanthropists James and Marilyn Alsdorf from a New York art dealer.
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